Messias v. Messiah


#1

Hi CAF!

I was reading through my religion course and I noticed that the words “Messias” and “Messiah” are used interchangeably to refer to the Jesus Christ. I was curious as to the origin of the words are and whether is matters which we use. Thank you! God bless!


#2

Messias = Messiah via Greek/Latin.

Messiah = as translated directly from the Hebrew (moshiach)

It’s a pet peeve of mine, call it irrational if you will, but I ABSOLUTELY HATE the Latinized versions: Messias, Isias, Elias, Eliseus, Josue, Noe, Jeremias, Ochosias, Osee, Abdias, Aggeus, etc. where they appear in the protocanonical Old Testament. It is THE prime reason I do not own a Douay-Rheims Bible.


#3

The Language Geek confirms.

It’s a pet peeve of mine, call it irrational if you will, but I ABSOLUTELY HATE the Latinized versions: Messias, Isias, Elias, Eliseus, Josue, Noe, Jeremias, Ochosias, Osee, Abdias, Aggeus, etc. where they appear in the protocanonical Old Testament. It is THE prime reason I do not own a Douay-Rheims Bible.

Two thumbs way, way up :thumbsup: :thumbsup:


#4

Thank you for the clear answer! :thumbsup::thumbsup:


#5

I don’t normally use them, but I don’t understand your extreme negative reaction to these renderings.


#6

I won’t presume to speak for porthos, but my negative reaction is because those renderings are far from the traditional English renderings, and even farther from the Hebrew originals.


#7

As I said, call it irrational.

They are not the names I grew up learning about and actually came to love. The Latinized versions just sound, well, weird.

How in the world can “Ochosias” ever stand for “Ahaziah” for example? Or “Abdias” for “Obadaiah?” And especially “Eliseus” for “Elisha” and “Elias” for “Elijah”?

No, no no no. Gosh, it burns!

Call it irrational.


#8

I suppose you have nothing against “Jesus”. :wink: (Actually, Yehoshua sounds cool, too :slight_smile: ).

In fact, in Polish, which is my mother tongue, all names came from latinized versions, and in addition, the -s is actually read as -sh! So for Isaiah we have Izayash, for Hosea Ozeash etc. :slight_smile:

God bless, V.


#9

I’m surprised you should attach so much importance to such a minor detail. If you were living in France, I wonder, would you refuse to open a Bible in French because of the “wrong” spellings such as Matthieu, Marc, Luc, and Jean?


#10

I will point you again to my initial comment.

Call me irrational.


#11

Well, how about the Septuagint and the Greek NT? Do you find the spellings Ησαιας and Ματθαιος equally offputting? And, if so, does it cause you no concern that you’re cutting yourself off from a valuable source of information, just because of something that you yourself readily admit is an irrational prejudice?

I’m just trying to be helpful, okay?

Kind regards
Bart

biblehub.com/greek/2268.htm

biblehub.com/greek/3156.htm


#12

No, because it’s Greek and that’s how they are properly declined in Greek. That’s why I don’t object to Tobias, Judas, Jesus, Ananias as they come to us from the New Testament and Deuterocanonicals because they come from the Greek.

I like Greek. I’m studying it as time allows.


#13

Yes, I like Greek too, though it’s a difficult language. I never got very far with it.


#14

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