(Methodist Protestant) This is my "protest" against the Catholic chruch!!!

Where do I start? Hmm… with my experience…

I went to a catholic church once and it was so hostile, no one spoke to me, no one greeted me, no one explained anything to me and they all just kept giving me weird and very mean looks from the side because I was an “out sider”.

When I got a quick word with a woman at the back of the church I mentioned that I was a protestant from a methodist chruch, then suddenly every one seemed on edge and gave me funny looks as if I should be in their church.

You have the cathechism and the book of cannons, communion, loads of different events during the week that aren’t even explained to you. What are they for? Why has your chruch made it so difficult or even impossible for a new commer to grasp!?

I don’t protest against the covenant made to peter, the keys given to him or even the fact that the pope decends from him. But I think that the catholic church just hasn’t done its best with that covenant…

You don’t go out to the lost sheep but instead you call them “outsiders”…
You stay in you church and look after each other but what happened to christ good words such as - “Do you love me? Go and tend to my sheep.” I don’t see the catholic chruch trending to lost sheeps do you?

The chruch is just a museum of saints and a place of religious routine instead of a place of whorship.

Where is the whorship!? When I go there you are just going to one page to another with out even telling me where I should be in this “book” that I’ve never seen before by the way! There is this other book of hymms and even that has no direction… What is this and why does every body else seem to know what pages to go to but I don’t!?

I didn’t feel like I was in a chruch, it felt more like a temple with images and statues that people were kissing and bowing to! Some of the catholics there even got down on their knees to a statue of joseph (Mary’s husband).

Catholics seem to be like muslims - very religious but lacking in love and peace giving emotions!

And when do catholics even bother to go to protestants and try to convert them!? I’ll give you a big clue, never, that’s when!

Why is all the writings on the walls in a strange language!?

Why was jesus spelt as Jesvs? Why was Mary spelt as Maria? :shrug:

Gasp… :snowing:

…and also I should mention that I’m not entirly bothered that there are books missing from my bible! There must obviously be good reason for that! So start on me about that issue!

I don’t believe one single word that you have posted.

:rotfl:

That’s very helpfu of you 1ke!

…but seriously I not trying to offend you! Perhaps that’s why you aren’t listening, because you think I’m just being mean?

xxx zundrah xxx

As a fellow Methodist, let me answer a few of these things.

  1. You cannot judge a Church by one church. I’ve been to Methodist, Catholic, Baptist, Lutheran, etc. churches that were warm and welcoming and others that were cold and distant. It is a reflection of the people at that location, not the greater Church itself.

  2. The “strange” writing is in Latin. In the Bible when the angel appears to Mary and says “Hail, full of Grace” he is obviously talking to Mary.Therefore we get the words Hail Mary.
    In Latin “Ave Maria” Please remember that for that vast majority of it’s life on Earth the Christian Church was conduction in Latin. Therefore you get Maria for Mary and V for U in words (thus JESVS = JESUS as there was no U in Latin)

  3. The Bible. Without the early Church there would be no Bible as such. It was compiled and approved over 1600 years ago at councils in Carthage. The bible was set up with Canon (true and approved books) and Deuterocanon (inspirational and worthy but not wholly canon) The books missing from most Protestant Bibles are the DeuteroCanon.
    However, this does not mean they are forgotten. As a Methodist I ask you to read the book of Wisdom. It is a DeuteroCanon book but you will find much of our liturgy and practice comes from this book. And that’s okay.

Pax,
(this is Peace in Latin)

Bryan

I’ll offer to you the opinion that your experience in a Catholic Church was anecdotal. I have been in CC’s and felt quite invited and welcomed. I’ve been in some Lutheran Churches where I would not have needed ice to chill a glass of tea. :wink:

Jon

LOL - I nearly turned to stone in that catholic chruch! :smiley:

:stuck_out_tongue:
As long as you understand that your experience was just that one parish, and the entire CC shouldn’t be judged by the friendliness, or lack thereof, of one congregation.

Jon

That answers alot of questions but still, where are the catholics attending the lost sheep!? They don’t even go out and preach but protestants are well known for going out to preach the word! The catholic chruch just remains stationary and never goes out to the world…

Well… what about all this;

Where is the whorship!? When I go there you are just going to one page to another with out even telling me where I should be in this “book” that I’ve never seen before by the way! There is this other book of hymms and even that has no direction… What is this and why does every body else seem to know what pages to go to but I don’t!?

And when do catholics even bother to go to protestants and try to convert them!? I’ll give you a big clue, never, that’s when!

You have the cathechism and the book of cannons, communion, loads of different events during the week that aren’t even explained to you. What are they for? Why has your chruch made it so difficult or even impossible for a new commer to grasp!?

!!!

Goodness, the CC has one of the largest operations dedicated to helping the poor of the world. Is that not spreading His grace and the Gospel?

Jon

Following the “book” is very easy. You start at the beginning. Then you turn to the readings section (listed by date). And you follow allong from there.

The music is either listed at the front of the church, or it will be announced just before each piece begins.

You don’t have to follow along in either book. Some people do. Others prefer to listen instead of listen/read along.

When did you strike up a conversation with the woman who shot you “funny” looks? There is no uneccessary talking before or during Mass. When you come in, you pray and prepare for the Mass. During Mass, you concentrate on what’s going on.

There are good mass books that are written for kids. I’ve bought them for adults who are returning to the Church after many years away. If you go to a Catholic bookstore, you’ll find one for less than $10. It will help you follow along.

BTW, one of the things you’re complaining about is the only thing that some others like about Catholics-We don’t generally go around telling other people that they should be Catholic.

If I had never walked into that catholic church a few weeks ago then I would never have met a catholic at all! Where are they! They don’t preach out of the four walls of their chruch!

I’m a former Protestant who believes the Catholic Church is closest to the truth. I’ve a couple of disagreements with it, but by and large I think it’s the real church. Nevertheless I’ll admit it can seem impersonal and unwelcoming, the liturgy strange to someone brought up in the much simpler protestant style, evangelism almost non-existent, homilies poor, music half hearted, and there are a few other criticisms.

When I joned, I did not go by personal invitation, but because I felt God was pushing me towards it.

I can think of a couple of reasons why the Church is the way it is. My old Protestant pastor once said to me, “Protestants tell a lot of lies about Catholics and the Catholic Church.” Catholics are as wary of Protestants sitting in their pews as Protestants are of Catholics in theirs. If I say in a Protestant church that I’m Catholic, a subtle barrier goes up.

Secondly most Catholics come right through the system, including being brought up in a Catholic School, probably had Catholic parents, and know the system. To them it’s second nature.

At the same time I think this life long affiliation with the Church breeds a sort of complacency.

The truth is that we don’t make enough attempt to evangelise, despite the fact we’ve got 2000 years of history on our side. When you think about it, almost every TV evangelist is a Protestant. There is a show called EWTN, but it’s too dry to be evangelistic.

Nor are we personal enough. The first church I went to was Presbyterian. Although there were only about 150 people, we had a gym under the church, there was an active young people’s group, people knew you, there was a home Bible Study group, we went places together, we played music together etc. In the Catholic Church I go to there is a women’s group, but in the purely social sense there is practically nothing else. My wife’s Baptist Church has home study groups, womens groups, Boys and Girls Brigades, Kid’s Club (or something like it), English language classes for migrants, the music group/s practice every week (we don’t practice at all except for Christmas and Easter), youth group, young adults group, missionary support, and often run church based functions.

As a consequence they have a much stronger sense of belonging to their own parish community.

On the other hand, the Catholic Church is huge. It has hundreds of hospitals and medical clinics, quite a number of universities, colleges, seminaries, churches, retirement and nursing homes and villages, schools, employment agencies, overseas aid agencies, St. Vincent De Paul, and other establishments within its ranks. This leads to a sort of a wider view, rather than a local view. As a consequence the tentative Protestant convert, who tends to have a more local parish or church identity, can feel depersonalised.

He comes into a church with a liturgy he doesn’t understand, with an organisation that is foreign to him, with customs not clearly explained to him, and is surrounded by people so used to the system that they cannot understand his or her misgivings.

So … the Catholic Church needs to start evangelising more. And it also needs to put into place ways and means of making people feel welcome in the local church. To be honest, while I believe Protestants should join the Catholic Church, I’d be tardy about recommending that they go because I think they’ll be disappointed.

But if you really want to make an informed start, then go to an RCIA program. Forget about going into the church off your own bat. You can find out about the RCIA program from the nearest parish office.

=kalt;5421341]Following the “book” is very easy. You start at the beginning. Then you turn to the readings section (listed by date). And you follow allong from there.

The music is either listed at the front of the church, or it will be announced just before each piece begins.

I know what you mean, they usually should have a list of numbers that are the songs of that mass, but there was no list and I heard no announcment!

You don’t have to follow along in either book. Some people do. Others prefer to listen instead of listen/read along.

LOL - This sounds like a good idea!

When did you strike up a conversation with the woman who shot you “funny” looks? There is no uneccessary talking before or during Mass. When you come in, you pray and prepare for the Mass. During Mass, you concentrate on what’s going on.

This was after mass! And any way I should have been able to speak with some one! It’s ridiculous that I had no one to speak to for more then 5 seconds!

BTW, one of the things you’re complaining about is the only thing that some others like about Catholics-We don’t generally go around telling other people that they should be Catholic.

That’s the problem! You leave the athiest to just be athiest! But protestant churches have people and missionaries who go out and preach! Standing back and keeping christ all to your self is not very christian is it!? That’s not going to get people into Gods kingdom!

kalt, the mass was just too much and with no explaination! Going into that catholic church was the biggest shock I’ve ever had in christianity!

xxx zundrah xxx

According to Mother Teresa, she didn’t go around trying to find converts. She simply served the poor. If someone asked her about her religion, she answered their questions.
Preaching the Gospel is one thing. Living the Gospel is a more powerful thing.

If you’ve never come accross a Catholic, who did you know that there is a Catholic Church? Did you happen to find one while driving by? Certainly, the CC has a pressence where you live. Otherwise, you wouldn’t know the Church exists. Seems it’s not as icognito as you say. :wink:

What made you attend a Mass?

I guess, then, that Catholicism isn’t for you. At least not right now. :wink:

You’re kidding me.

Were you naked? Were you behaving strangely? Otherwise, it might have been timing. Generally there’s not a lot of discussion going on during the Mass proper. The time to ask questions about the Order of Mass would be well in advance of the Mass, or during the coffee hour afterwards (if there is one).

Did you take communion? If so, that’s a big no-no, and might be the source of their unease.

It’s all part of the fun! Once you can follow the Missal from start to finish, you’re instantly raptured into Heaven. That’s why you won’t find anybody on Earth who can.

Just as incense, bells, icons, statutes, chanting, kneeling, and ritual do not necessarily guarantee true prayer, neither does loud singing, clapping, or bombastic sermonizing guarantee true prayer.

– N.

Thank you for your input, though it does seem rather unfriendly! :slight_smile:
You went “once” so it is perhaps a little unfair to judge all by one experience. :)Seeing a newcomer, the folk were probably curious, but not hostile…your interpretation because you felt strange! For all they knew initially you were a visiting Catholic anyway. And they may have felt a little surprised when you said you were Protestant…,but I like most people I know would smile and make you welcome, even if some wouldn’t be quite sure what to say, not knowing why you were there. They wouldn’t want to put their foot in it and say the wrong thing.

You’ve made your mind up, so it’s a little difficult to discuss with you…but remember that Jesus said, Judge not or you shall be judged, and you are judging a million million Catholics all in one. I think you will find that God finds a great many of us to be loving and kind, and generous.

And we don’t like to be discourteous to others and push our beliefs on others. We trust the Holy Spirit to lead when He wishes. A lot of churches, certainly here in Australia have data projectors showing the responses that we all give, and also the hymns…and of course, even for Catholics, it does take a time to get to know them.

Not all Catholic churches have lots of statues or writing on walls in Latin, many don’t, but these are no more than say a photo to remind you, to ask for prayer of holy people. There is no harm in anyone asking a friend’s or a pastor’s prayers, so with the holy people in heaven. The people aren’t kneeling to statues that have no life, they are kneeling because when they are used to kneeling when they pray. They are only asking these holy saints to pray. But always our true focus is Jesus, is God.

You are very cross, it seems! The way you wrote, you sound like you only want to think badly of Catholics. Ah well. You can if you want, that’s your free choice…but I know so many good, kind, welcoming Catholics, that I can’t get upset over anything you said…but I hope you feel happier soon! :slight_smile:

God bless you, Trishie

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