Methodists


#1

Happy Monday!
My paternal grandma is Methodist. Are there any Methodist posters who can help me (a Catholic) understand what Methodists believe? Any ideas on helping God convert Grandma?

God bless you!


#2

i don’t know too much about the methodists. i do know that they broke from the church of england (anglican/episcopalian) and i think they’re similar to them, at least in some respects.


#3

[quote=coralewis]Happy Monday!
My paternal grandma is Methodist. Are there any Methodist posters who can help me (a Catholic) understand what Methodists believe? Any ideas on helping God convert Grandma?

God bless you!
[/quote]

Hello, currently i’m praying for a few to convert, and Jesus gave us a prayer to say for conversion in the Divine Mercy revelations.

Jesus said, "I desire that you know more profoundly the Love that burns in My Heart for souls,and you will understand this when you meditate on My Passion.
Call upon My Mercy on behalf of sinners;I desire their salvation.
When you say this prayer, with a contrite heart and with faith on behalf of some sinner, I will give him the grace of conversion.

“Oh Blood and Water, which gushed forth from the Heart of Jesus as a fount of Mercy for us, I trust in You”.

Diary of Saint Faustina (1,187)—Prayer should be said kneeling in front of a picture of Divine Mercy.
divinemercysunday.com/


#4

don’t worry so much about trying to convert grandma… you show grandma just how a good catholic lives a good orthodox catholic life…


#5

I was born into a Methodist family, baptized in a Methodist church, lived a Methodist life, confirmed a Methodist…and now I am on the road to Rome. The Methodist church broke from the Anglican church in the 18th century. It was founded by the Wesley brothers. However, they did not intend to break away from the Anglican church. They simply wanted some reform (a Protestant protesting…now there’s a stretch…haha). The problem with Methodism is the wishy-washy morals and ethics. It is basically a “personal experience” denomination. Read about them at www.umc.org especially on the topic of abortion.

God Bless!!
DU


#6

STIOFAN, thank you for recommending that prayer. Lone Ranger, you gave very good advice. I’m doing my best.
A Catholic friend converted from Methodist over a year ago, and he told me that the hardest thing (for him) to understand was the primacy of the pope. Any ideas on explaining this to non-Catholics?


#7

[quote=snowman10] The problem with Methodism is the wishy-washy morals and ethics. It is basically a “personal experience” denomination. Read about them at www.umc.org especially on the topic of abortion.
[/quote]

It’s not really that wishy-washy, just like any other church people twist it to fit their own agenda’s. As far as abortion, it’s only seen as acceptable when the mother’s life is at risk. We Methodist’s don’t believe oyu use it for birth control.


#8

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methodism


#9

[quote=wabrams]It’s not really that wishy-washy, just like any other church people twist it to fit their own agenda’s. As far as abortion, it’s only seen as acceptable when the mother’s life is at risk. We Methodist’s don’t believe oyu use it for birth control.
[/quote]

Wabrams, I don’t understand your last sentence. Please clarify.


#10

This is from www.umc.org, I have highlighted areas of interest.

Abortion
http://www.umc.org/uploads/images//about_believe_nurtcompgfour_lg(1).jpgThe beginning of life and the ending of life are the God-given boundaries of human existence. While individuals have always had some degree of control over when they would die, they now have the awesome power to determine when and even whether new individuals will be born.

Our belief in the sanctity of unborn human life makes us reluctant to approve abortion. But we are equally bound to respect the sacredness of the life and well-being of the mother, for whom devastating damage may result from an unacceptable pregnancy. In continuity with past Christian teaching, we recognize tragic conflicts of life with life that may justify abortion, and in such cases we support the legal option of abortion under proper medical procedures. We cannot affirm abortion as an acceptable means of birth control, and we unconditionally reject it as a means of gender selection.

We oppose the use of late-term abortion known as dilation and extraction (partial-birth abortion) and call for the end of this practice except when the physical life of the mother is in danger and no other medical procedure is available, or in the case of severe fetal anomalies incompatible with life. We call all Christians to a searching and prayerful inquiry into the sorts of conditions that may warrant abortion. We commit our Church to continue to provide nurturing ministries to those who terminate a pregnancy, to those in the midst of a crisis pregnancy, and to those who give birth. We particularly encourage the Church, the government, and social service agencies to support and facilitate the option of adoption. (See ¶ 161.K.)

Governmental laws and regulations do not provide all the guidance required by the informed Christian conscience. Therefore, a decision concerning abortion should be made only after thoughtful and prayerful consideration by the parties involved, with medical, pastoral, and other appropriate counsel.

*From *The Book of Discipline of The United Methodist Church - 2004. Copyright 2004 by The United Methodist Publishing House. Used by permission.

I have highlighted areas in red that seem to indicate wishy-washiness and questionable discernment on abortion.

The first highlighted portion comes across as contradictory. It seems to imply that the life of the unborn child is sacred and then goes on to say that the life of the mother is sacred as well. This is very true but one cannot put a price on either life. They are both sacred. But it seems to be saying that the mother is more fit for life and better suited to deserve life than the child. Someone once said that if she was told that she had to choose between her life and the childs, she would give her life up for her child like a true mother should.

The second highlighted area is one of the most blatant attempts at not tackling a serious problem. The UMC says that it cannot “affirm” abortion as birth control. The word *affirm *used in this context is hardly powerful or authoritative. Look up the synonyms for the word *affirm *and you come up with assert, asseverate, attest, aver, avouch, avow, certify, cinch, clinch, confirm, cross heart, declare, guarantee, ice, insist, lock up, maintain, nail down, okay, predicate, profess, pronounce, ratify, repeat, rubber-stamp, set, state, swear, testify, vouch, and witness. Any of these words used in the context is simply not strong enough to convey that the UMC opposes abortion as a means of birth control. Meriam-Webster Dictionary defines the word in question:
*AFFIRM: *
1 a : VALIDATE, CONFIRM b : to state positively
2 : to assert (as a judgment or decree) as valid or confirmed
3 : to express dedication to
intransitive senses
1 : to testify or declare by affirmation as distinguished from swearing an oath
2 : to uphold a judgment or decree of a lower court


#11

continued

Therefore, the UMC is saying that they cannot state positvely that abortion should not be used for birth control. Translated it comes across as “We cannot declare abortion as an acceptable means of birth control for sure.” Notice also the next part of that highlighted portion where it says “we UNCONDITIOANLLY reject it as a means of gender selection.” Much much stronger words and tone, especially when compared to first statement of that sentence. Also, notice the third highlighted portion and the tone used in it. Once again, more stern and authoritative. But once again it compares the value of the mother’s life to the value of the child’s life. As far as severe fetal anomalies incompatible with life, that is still no reason to take the life. We are not God and have no right to take it from them.(I am also anti-captial punishment for the same reasons) The final part of that section irks me by asking Christians to pray to have knowledge of when abortion is acceptable. It is sad when we must pray to know when the killing of an unborn child is appropriate. If anything it truly shows this Culture of Death we live in.

I am in no way bashing the UMC. I grew up in it and am eternally grateful for its dedication at striving for perfection in the Lord. But this is a serious subject that should be re-evaluated by the UMC.
May God bless the UMC and all its members, as well as everyone else.

DU…:blessyou:


#12

snowman10, thank you for your help. You’re a great teacher.
My husband and I went to a Christopher West seminar in January and stayed at Grandma’s house. We learned a bit about the Theology of the Body at that seminar.
Recently, I attempted to explain the Church’s position on contraception to Grandma via IM. She joked that it doesn’t apply to her anymore, as her childbearing years are over. I realize now that contraception is very much related to abortion, especially since people who contracept tend to view abortion as a backup in case they “accidentally” conceive. Grandma seems to be prolife so it shouldn’t be too hard to get her to see why Catholics are opposed to contraception and abortion. I’m writing a little about this at my family’s Christian forum: dashjr.is-a-geek.org/truth (it’s free to join and post) under the category “Theology of the Body”.


#13

Coralewis,

Thank you for your kind words. I hope at 19 years old I have not peaked…lol. Hopefully I can help others with the Catholic faith for years to come. Heck, I am not even a Catholic yet…:whacky:

As far as the Pope goes, please consider gettingUnabridged Christianity by Fr. Mario Romero for your friend. It answers many questions and is wonderfully entertaining. I mention this book in many of my threads due to its effect on myself.

Have a good day and a great forever…:smiley:

DU


#14

Methodists followithe theology of John Wesley. Some distinctives: he did not believe in Once Saved, Always Saved; followers of Christ can experience the sanctifying grace of God in Christ and lead a holy life; they have somewhat of a liturgy, coming from the Church of England as they did; they have two sacraments, Baptism and the Lord’s Supper, but I think they follow the symbolic meaning but I’m not 100% on this, and I think they baptize infants.

I don’t think the Wesley brothers broke from the Church of England. They had formed what was known as Holy Clubs, groups of believers who wanted to experience Biblical Christianity. Their fellow Anglican George Whitfield made the break after John’s death. Interestingly, he was a Calvinist but Methodists stuck with Wesley’s theology of salvation.

I think they’re called Methodists because that was Wesley’s nickname in seminary, the Methodist, because he had a method for everything.

Blessings,
Gene


#15

Gene C.

You are correct and very smart. You win…nothing but you have credibility and that is what really matter around here…:smiley: .

Methodists DO baptize infants.

No, the Wesley’s did NOT break away from the COE, but their followers did following their deaths.

The term “Methodists” was actually an insult to the brothers for the reason that they had methods for everything.

Good Job, Gene!!!

DU…:thumbsup:


#16

I believe that the Methodists have a strong emphasis on faith in action and good works. In the old days this meant a very strong ethic of personal conduct and dress. Methodists were known to forbid dancing, jewelry, red shoes, smoking and drinking. They had a strong sense of social obligation.

These days, this tendency has changed into concern for the poor, and other social concerns. They have relaxed their views on certain areas of personal morality, such as sexuality, abortion, etc. They now more focused on social justice concerns. They now have a tendency to identify with liberal causes, I think.


#17

[quote=coralewis]Wabrams, I don’t understand your last sentence. Please clarify.
[/quote]

No problem. I meant that Methodists don’t believe you use abortions as a form of birth control.


#18

[quote=WhiteDove]I believe that the Methodists have a strong emphasis on faith in action and good works. In the old days this meant a very strong ethic of personal conduct and dress. Methodists were known to forbid dancing, jewelry, red shoes, smoking and drinking. They had a strong sense of social obligation.

These days, this tendency has changed into concern for the poor, and other social concerns. They have relaxed their views on certain areas of personal morality, such as sexuality, abortion, etc. They now more focused on social justice concerns. They now have a tendency to identify with liberal causes, I think.
[/quote]

You are correct…Methodists are becoming more and more liberal. Being a Methodist myself, though now I no longer consider myself one, I have seen the liberalization of the UMC.

DU


#19

[quote=snowman10]I was born into a Methodist family, baptized in a Methodist church, lived a Methodist life, confirmed a Methodist…and now I am on the road to Rome. The Methodist church broke from the Anglican church in the 18th century. It was founded by the Wesley brothers. However, they did not intend to break away from the Anglican church. They simply wanted some reform (a Protestant protesting…now there’s a stretch…haha). The problem with Methodism is the wishy-washy morals and ethics. It is basically a “personal experience” denomination. Read about them at www.umc.org especially on the topic of abortion.

I was raised Methodist, and let me tell you…It was not always “wishy-washy”…There have been a lot of changes over the years that have caused the Methodist Church to become more secular in it’s views. The same could be said for some other “mainline” Protestant denominations. It is the Evangelicals who are holding down the fort when it comes to morality and character.

God Bless!!
DU
[/quote]


#20

For a “World Religions” course taught at a local community college, I had to visit a faith that was exactly opposite to my own (i.e. Catholics go to Protestant services or Buddhist, or something non-Catholic etc.) for a project. As a Catholic, I went to the Church of Resurrection, a local Methodist church, for a contemporary and experience can only be described as cultural shock.

Since we had to write a paper describing our knowledge and some knowledge of the faith, I interviewed a pastor as well as visited this site to gain more knowledge: newadvent.org/cathen/10237b.htm

The Catholic Encyclopedia describes the origins, doctines, and history as well as how Methodism is practiced in different countries.

Remember: we do not convert others, God does!

Peace,
FJ


DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.