Michelangelo's Fresco of the Last Judgment

A powerful meditation by José Granados, DCJM, who is an assistant professor of patrology and philosophy of the body at the Pontifical John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and the Family at The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. It was part of an article titled *Risen Time: Easter as the Source of History *in the Spring 2010 issue of Communio that is devoted to The Paschal Mystery.

Links will take you to a virtual tour of Michelangelo's fresco of the Last Judgment. I've contrasted the Vatican's factual presentation of the fresco with Fr. Granados' perceptive reflection. It will cause you to view the fresco in a completely different light -- which is what great commentary does.

Start here: payingattentiontothesky.com/2010/07/23/2529/

dj

Hi, Djeter,

Thank you for sharing this site. I truly enjoyed reading the material and re-enjoying the famous fresco.

God bless

[quote="djeter, post:1, topic:206330"]
A powerful meditation by José Granados, DCJM, who is an assistant professor of patrology and philosophy of the body at the Pontifical John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and the Family at The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. It was part of an article titled *Risen Time: Easter as the Source of History *in the Spring 2010 issue of Communio that is devoted to The Paschal Mystery.

Links will take you to a virtual tour of Michelangelo's fresco of the Last Judgment. I've contrasted the Vatican's factual presentation of the fresco with Fr. Granados' perceptive reflection. It will cause you to view the fresco in a completely different light -- which is what great commentary does.

Start here: payingattentiontothesky.com/2010/07/23/2529/

dj

[/quote]

[quote="tqualey, post:2, topic:206330"]
Hi, Djeter,

Thank you for sharing this site. I truly enjoyed reading the material and re-enjoying the famous fresco.

God bless

[/quote]

..I always kinda liked the concept that he painted God..left-handed...as a southpaw I knew we had it all over you folks of the left brains....in cave paintings most of the animals are painted looking to the right..that means the artist was left-handed since it would be a distastor to go the other way for the mixture would smear..plus most of the hands ,that one sees,are of the right hand for the left hand held the reed to the mouth in this early spray gun .Michs.face is of course on that rag that is hanging with the broken nose and all..he was one genuine genius........Pas

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