Military chaplains told to shy from Jesus

To pray – or not to pray – in Jesus’ name is the question plaguing an increasing number of U.S. military chaplains, one of whom began a multiday hunger strike outside the White House yesterday.
“I am a Navy chaplain being fired because I pray in Jesus’ name,” said Navy Lt. Gordon Klingenschmitt, who will be holding 6 p.m. prayer vigils daily in Lafayette Park.
The hunger strike is intended to persuade President Bush to issue an executive order allowing military chaplains to pray according to their individual faith traditions. The American Center for Law and Justice has gathered 173,000 signatures on a petition seeking an executive order.
washtimes.com/national/20051221-121224-6972r.htm

Here is the link to the petition for those who want to sign it:

Petition to Protect Military Prayer

newkerala.com/news.php?action=fullnews&id=71635

[font=Arial] WASHINGTON: A U.S. [font=Arial][font=Arial]Navy[/font] chaplain has begun a hunger strike in Washington to protest a [font=Arial]military[/font] policy that bans mentioning [font=Arial]Jesus[/font] in Christian prayer.[/font]

Navy Lt. Gordon Klingenschmitt believes he may lose his [font=Arial][font=Arial]job[/font] next month and be evicted from military housing, because during the summer of 2004 aboard the USS Anzio, he preached an evangelistic sermon at the funeral of a [font=Arial]Catholic[/font] sailor in a base chapel. The lieutenant said he was reprimanded by two senior chaplains and, in March, sent ashore to Norfolk.[/font]

Official military policy allows any sort of [font=Arial][font=Arial]prayer[/font], but Klingenschmitt told The Washington Times that in reality, evangelical Protestant prayers are censored.[/font][/font]

:confused: I can’t think of too many Catholics who would be bothered by an evangelical sermon or praying “in Jesus’ name.” Did the chaplain say something derogatory about the state of the sailor’s soul due to his Catholic faith? That would be tacky and improper…

[quote=Matt25]newkerala.com/news.php?action=fullnews&id=71635

[font=Arial]WASHINGTON: A U.S. [font=Arial][font=Arial]Navy[/font] chaplain has begun a hunger strike in Washington to protest a [font=Arial]military[/font] policy that bans mentioning [font=Arial]Jesus[/font] in Christian prayer.[/font]

Navy Lt. Gordon Klingenschmitt believes he may lose his [font=Arial][font=Arial]job[/font] next month and be evicted from military housing, because during the summer of 2004 aboard the USS Anzio, he preached an evangelistic sermon at the funeral of a [font=Arial]Catholic[/font] sailor in a base chapel. The lieutenant said he was reprimanded by two senior chaplains and, in March, sent ashore to Norfolk.[/font]

Official military policy allows any sort of [font=Arial][font=Arial]prayer[/font], but Klingenschmitt told The Washington Times that in reality, evangelical Protestant prayers are censored.[/font][/font]
[/quote]

One of the Reverend’s supporters is quoted thus michnews.com/artman/publish/article_10991.shtml

The term “God” is permitted of course because that may refer to any deity. However, to particularize that deity in the incarnation of Jesus Christ seems to be anathema. Not so, according to one’s constitutional rights. Not so, according to America’s Judeo-Christian heritage.

“Muslim, Jewish and Roman Catholic chaplains are likewise told not to pray in the name of Allah, in Hebrew or in the name of the Trinity, he added. But the Rev. Billy Baugham, executive director of the Greenville, S.C.-based International Conference of Evangelical Chaplain Endorsers, says restrictions on other religious expressions have ‘yet to be tested.’”

“’No Islamic chaplain has been refused to pray in the name of Allah, as far as we know. Neither has a rabbi been rebuked for making references to Hanukkah, and no Catholic priest has been rebuked for referring to the Blessed Virgin Mary.’”

Apparently referring to the BVM does not form part of America’s Judeo-Christian heritage… Hmm is this a cause Catholic’s should really get behind? Also see theconservativevoice.com/articles/article.html?id=10956

By Sher Zieve – Appearing on The Sean Hannity show Wednesday, Navy Chaplain Lt. Gordon Klingenschmitt said that he was told by his Commanding Officer that he could not use the name of Jesus, while in uniform. Klingenschmitt advised that, when conducting Bible study or prayer, he could only quote from the “Jewish portion” (Old Testament) of the Bible…

Later in the program, Klingenschmitt’s Commanding Officer, Navy Chaplain Cpt. Holcomb, spoke on the Hannity show to say that Klingenschmitt’s claims are false. Cpt. Holcomb further said that Lt. Klingenschmitt has not been told to eliminate the name of Jesus and that he is not in jeopardy of losing his job.

[quote=Matt25]One of the Reverend’s supporters is quoted thus michnews.com/artman/publish/article_10991.shtml

Apparently referring to the BVM does not form part of America’s Judeo-Christian heritage… Hmm is this a cause Catholic’s should really get behind? Also see theconservativevoice.com/articles/article.html?id=10956

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I have been around Military Chaplins quite a bit. I must admit that I find this story puzzling. I have never heard of this.

It all depends on your audience. If you are saying mass, nothing changes. If you are praying with the entire Company, you should try to do it in a non-denominational way.

[quote=gilliam]It all depends on your audience. If you are saying mass, nothing changes. If you are praying with the entire Company, you should try to do it in a non-denominational way.
[/quote]

Exactly. My understanding is that this is what chaplains are trained to do. They wouldn’t be stopped from ending with a prayer “in Jesus’ name” or “In the name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit” would they? I’m really confused by this story.

[quote=rlg94086]Exactly. My understanding is that this is what chaplains are trained to do. They wouldn’t be stopped from ending with a prayer “in Jesus’ name” or “In the name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit” would they? I’m really confused by this story.
[/quote]

Not generally, no. But it is often discouraged.

The Journal Stars and Stripes reports on this estripes.com/article.asp?section=104&article=33868

Navy spokesman Lt. William Marks said Klingenschmitt is still an active-duty sailor in good standing, has no disciplinary action pending, and has not received any punishment for language used in public forums…

Marks also said that rules governing Navy chaplains do not limit what they can say during religious ceremonies but do specify that chaplains should “focus on practices the faiths have in common” when speaking at secular and public events.

The rules are explained to all chaplains during their training, Marks said, and are the same for all faiths.

[quote=Matt25]The Journal Stars and Stripes reports on this estripes.com/article.asp?section=104&article=33868

Navy spokesman Lt. William Marks said Klingenschmitt is still an active-duty sailor in good standing, has no disciplinary action pending, and has not received any punishment for language used in public forums…

Marks also said that rules governing Navy chaplains do not limit what they can say during religious ceremonies but do specify that chaplains should “focus on practices the faiths have in common” when speaking at secular and public events.

The rules are explained to all chaplains during their training, Marks said, and are the same for all faiths.

[/quote]

yep

In the name of Jesus, pray for those that espouse these views and pray for our men and women in the military…

gopusa.com/cgi-bin/ib3/ikonboard.pl?act=ST;f=17;t=26346

estripes.com/article.asp?section=104&article=33868

Navy spokesman Lt. William Marks said Klingenschmitt is still an active-duty sailor in good standing, has no disciplinary action pending, and has not received any punishment for language used in public forums. He would not comment on the paperwork accusation.

Marks also said that rules governing Navy chaplains do not limit what they can say during religious ceremonies but do specify that chaplains should “focus on practices the faiths have in common” when speaking at secular and public events.

The rules are explained to all chaplains during their training, Marks said, and are the same for all faiths.

I agree with the military on this one.

Being a military family, I have witnessed some of the Ev. Prot. preaching - not always Catholic friendly I must say. Usually it is not from the chaplain, but from their congregations where it is encouraged.

I have even been to a Military Chaplain (all faiths) event where the Protestant evangelists basically insulted the Jewish, Muslim, and other faiths using prayer. I was even taken back.

These military members (chaplains of various faiths) are hired as community chaplains - their denomination is second. When functioning as a community chaplain one must keep in mind the audience (as previous posters said). Functioning within ones own denomination is different. When I go to an event outside the church, I don’t want to be evangelized by other denominations. I may want to give thanks to our creator - and that is what everyone should do - no matter whom they think their creator may be - and leave it open at that.

[quote=ProudArmyWife]I agree with the military on this one.

Being a military family, I have witnessed some of the Ev. Prot. preaching - not always Catholic friendly I must say. Usually it is not from the chaplain, but from their congregations where it is encouraged.

I have even been to a Military Chaplain (all faiths) event where the Protestant evangelists basically insulted the Jewish, Muslim, and other faiths using prayer. I was even taken back.

These military members (chaplains of various faiths) are hired as community chaplains - their denomination is second. When functioning as a community chaplain one must keep in mind the audience (as previous posters said). Functioning within ones own denomination is different. When I go to an event outside the church, I don’t want to be evangelized by other denominations. I may want to give thanks to our creator - and that is what everyone should do - no matter whom they think their creator may be - and leave it open at that.
[/quote]

Wow! I thought they were trained better than that. I sort of pictured a general prayer, like they do before the first session of congress each year…or as my priest used to do when having an event with our Temple neighbors next door.

We agree on so much, why highlight differences in a general setting?

[quote=rlg94086]Wow! I thought they were trained better than that. I sort of pictured a general prayer, like they do before the first session of congress each year…or as my priest used to do when having an event with our Temple neighbors next door.

We agree on so much, why highlight differences in a general setting?
[/quote]

I also think this is a case where a bad apple spoiled the barrel. Community chaplains are supposed to bring us together. Military chaplains typically wear military uniforms, not collars, etc. when performing community duties. It really sounds as if this Rev. had his own personal agenda he was following. They are trained to be military community chaplains and he knew the options when he signed the dotted line.

Now I must say, in addition to the not so good community chaplains, there are many more wonderful military chaplains. I have even heard our priest say to some members that he cannot do something based on that at the time he is a community chaplain, not just a priest. I have also witnessed the command chaplain (protestant) put the breaks on adults leading an evan. group (anti-catholic one) at a department of defense high school.

What the military is saying is that basic prayers are okay. Prayers that evangelize or specifically depict one denomination as better are not. Those are saved for private conversations and religious services.

May God Bless Our Military Chaplains -
Especially Those Who Go In Harms Way In The Name Of Faith

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