Millenial Jews return to keeping Kosher


#1

npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2014/09/30/352583387/millennial-jews-embrace-old-world-eating?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=thesalt


#2

Kosher is cool. I personally avoid all shellfish -I see them better used as bait than food. Plus I’m allergic to shellfish, my lips, tongue and gums get all welted up and swelled. They’re just horrible little creatures unworthy of human consumption IMO.


#3

I am so, so, so sorry…


#4

Pax Christi!

More for me!

Really, I’m sorry about your condition. But since it’s okay for Christians to eat shellfish (and pork, and so on), yes, I sometimes enjoy.

God bless.


#5

This is interesting.

That said, I love shellfish. I love to eat clams, shrimp, and crabs.


#6

Kosher is healthy eating. There are definite health benefits, as well as spiritual benefits. The adage, “You are what you eat”, couldn’t be more true.

The holy Carthusian monks keep a vegetarian diet. While not technically “kosher”, vegetarianism is very similar.

Personally, I stopped having stomach problems once I started implementing some of the basics of the kosher diet - not mixing meat and cheese, eating kosher chicken and meat, etc. I don’t eat shrimp, shellfish, bacon, etc. My health has improved considerably as a result.

From a humanitarian point of view, kosher also has to do with humane slaughter of animals (if slaughter can even be called “humane”.) Apparently, if an animal is not slaughtered in a kosher manner, there are chemicals/adrenaline, etc. that are released into the meat that are not healthy for humans to consume. There is less pain for the animal, too, apparently.


#7

Their (and our) ancestors rejected so much of tradition – and now it falls to the younger generations to reclaim what was lost.


#8

Yes, the cycle seems to be turning back to tradition. Millenial Jews keeping the traditions that their elders rejected. And at least in my area, I have noted that millennial Catholics are returning to orthodoxy that their elders have neglected.


#9

Precisely.


#10

My understanding is that kosher killed animals is one of the quickest and humane ways of ending their life. Maybe you might know, but I thought there had to be a waiting period between eating meat and dairy. I had heard once that the body will not absorb the iron from meat if dairy is presents. Not sure if true but since you follow a modified type of kosher diet, you can let us know.


#11

Lobster also makes the list as one of my favorites.

Nothing like Dungeness crab though.


#12

I wonder if this is correlated with a resurgence in other Jewish customs? I’m not necessarily talking about a transition from Secular to Religious Jews (although this would be interesting); rather, I wonder whether Secular Jews are becoming more involved with other distinctive aspects of their religion (holy days, for example).


#13

I think that is true across the board with other religions. There is a search for meaning and ritual. While maybe the parents threw away rituals, they are important and do serve a purpose in giving meaning and guidance in life. I was reading a kosher cookbook and the author in the beginning was stating that eating kosher was a reminder that every time she open her mouth to eat, she was a Jew and honoring God. I think there is some lessons for us in that do all our actions honor God, even with the everyday things we do like eating? I think those are good questions to ask ourselves whether you are a kosher Jew or not.


#14

My understanding is that kosher killed animals is one of the quickest and humane ways of ending their life.

Yes, I believe that to be correct. The method of killing the animal is swift, and as painless as possible. As a result, the adrenaline chemicals don’t enter the bloodstream which makes the meat healthier to eat. With chicken, I also believe the kosher chicken goes through some sort of brine process of some sort that gets rid of a lot of waste product of some sort.

I am not sure how it all works, but I know since adopting the bulk of these rules in my own life, it has made a difference. I no longer get sick eating meat, for example.

Maybe you might know, but I thought there had to be a waiting period between eating meat and dairy. I had heard once that the body will not absorb the iron from meat if dairy is presents. Not sure if true but since you follow a modified type of kosher diet, you can let us know.

6 hours is the general rule if you are ultra-strict. I usually try to keep to the 6 hour rule, but sometimes break it at hour 4 or 5. Instead of cheeseburgers, I’ll eat a veggie burger with all the toppings, including cheese.

I think there is some lessons for us in that do all our actions honor God, even with the everyday things we do like eating? I think those are good questions to ask ourselves whether you are a kosher Jew or not.

If you really follow the Torah and rabbinic rules to the letter (as best a person can do, and even that without a Temple to offer sacrifices), your life is very rule-driven and governed from morning to sundown, with rules for eating, how to tie your shoes, and every possible nuance in your life imaginable to the point where it becomes almost mind-boggling. (Christ had not a few choice words in the New Testament about what he thought about all of these man-made traditions, by the way.) About the closest Catholic equivalent might be a strict monastery.

It’s easy to get bogged down in all of these rules, even rules regarding kosher. However, there are benefits as well – in the case of eating kosher, spiritual and health benefits. We now have the science to back some of the health benefits of kosher eating habits.


#15

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