Missal in digital format


#1

I have looked everywhere: Android Market, Google Books, Amazon, etc. I cannot find the Saint Joseph Missal anywhere in a digital format. No PDF downloads, or even secure online access through a purchased application. Why have Catholic publishers not gotten with the program? I understand that most people do not have their mobile phones or digital devices at Mass, but I wanted to use them outside of Mass as well. It makes things easier than trying to convince the kids to be careful with the books, especially since one set of books can set you back a good investment right now.

Does anyone know if there are future plans to introduce a digital missal to the market? I would gladly cough up the money. Or, if you know where to find one, please provide a link. Look forward to replies.


#2

There are none that I know of that are in the eBook format if that is what you are looking for. But if you are talking about stuff that would be found as an application on your smart phone, then you can just search in your phone or tablets App Store for missal or Catholic apps and there should be a myriad of different ones out there.

God bless!


#3

Outside of Mass is the only place where such Missals belong :o Last thing we need is people focusing on their digital devices during Holy Mass…or it may look a bit too much like Mark 13:14 :o


#4

[quote="ahollars, post:1, topic:332148"]
I have looked everywhere: Android Market, Google Books, Amazon, etc. I cannot find the Saint Joseph Missal anywhere in a digital format. No PDF downloads, or even secure online access through a purchased application. Why have Catholic publishers not gotten with the program? I understand that most people do not have their mobile phones or digital devices at Mass, but I wanted to use them outside of Mass as well. It makes things easier than trying to convince the kids to be careful with the books, especially since one set of books can set you back a good investment right now.

Does anyone know if there are future plans to introduce a digital missal to the market? I would gladly cough up the money. Or, if you know where to find one, please provide a link. Look forward to replies.

[/quote]

Have you tried the Laudate app? They have made some improvement/changes in recent months.

You can find it on Google play.


#5

iBreviary includes a Missal, although the readings have to be downloaded for each day.


#6

My wife and I use iMissal. It's available for all the major platforms -- Android, iOS, BlackBerry, and Windows Phone:

imissal.com/


#7

Universalis is a good Missal that does not require one to download the texts. :)

www.universalis.com


#8

LOL! No disrespect intended, I know what your saying, but kinda reminds me of Grandma saying , “the mass should only be said in Latin with the priests back to us and everyone should just sit there a say the rosary!”


#9

[quote="Neofight, post:8, topic:332148"]
LOL! No disrespect intended, I know what your saying, but kinda reminds me of Grandma saying , "the mass should only be said in Latin with the priests back to us and everyone should just sit there a say the rosary!"

[/quote]

Well, I guess it should, given that I serve at the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite (in Latin, with the priest leading the congregation facing east, and some people praying the Rosary...:D)


#10

Universalis is not suitable for other than personal use in the United States. It uses the Jerusalem Bible for the Scripture readings – and that version is not approved for Liturgical use for either the Mass or the Liturgy of the Hours. (The NAB is the version in the actual books).

You should be aware of that. iBreviary and Laudate both use the correct version in the US.

(PERSONAL OPINION FOLLOWS HERE)

Having said the above, I don’t see that it would be an issue for personal devotion outside of a liturgical setting. particularly for the laity.


#11

For those of you in the USA: if you purchase Universalis, you can have the Mass readings from the NAB, which I believe would make it fully suitable for use at Mass. (Obviously the text of the Missal is all fine - it’s just the question of the readings.)

The LotH is a different issue - I know that there are differences between the USA and other English translations, and Universalis only uses the Jerusalem Bible for the scriptural readings in the LotH. So, for praying the hours in the USA, Universalis would be fine for private use but not for public use.


#12

Thanks, everyone. It looks like iBreviary is the one I've been looking for. I have Laudate, and I tried iMissal, but I actually want the whole thing.


#13

The current version of Universalis has the Jerusalem Bible as it’s default but, under settings, you can switch to use the NAB for Mass. :slight_smile:

Here is a picture from my iPhone:
http://sphotos-a.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/1069868_175449395959734_1000108748_n.jpg


#14

[quote="markomalley, post:10, topic:332148"]
Universalis is not suitable for other than personal use in the United States. It uses the Jerusalem Bible for the Scripture readings -- and that version is not approved for Liturgical use for either the Mass or the Liturgy of the Hours. (The NAB is the version in the actual books).

You should be aware of that. iBreviary and Laudate both use the correct version in the US.

(PERSONAL OPINION FOLLOWS HERE)

Having said the above, I don't see that it would be an issue for personal devotion outside of a liturgical setting. particularly for the laity.

[/quote]

I don't think it really matter when you use it as a personal Missal.

I live in Canada, and I use the MTF Daily Roman Missal, which is an American one. I like to read the readings before Mass, and I really hate the disposable Living In Christ missalettes that are the only Canadian option (somethings feels wrong to me about throwing out the Word of God every month. Plus its a huge waste of paper). The LIC ones are tailored to each month and can't be reused, unlike the DRM which can be used every year until they change the calendar or release a new Missal.

I should also mention that I'm not a big fan of the NRSV-CE translation that is used for the lectionary here. The amount of inclusive language drives me up the wall sometimes. The current US lectionary translation seems slightly better in that regard.


#15

For that matter, I don’t see that there would be a problem using ANY Catholic version of the Scriptures (whether within a Missals or as bringing along a Bible) for the laity.

(The exception would be if a group of laity were praying the Breviary in choir, of course)

There are some who would say that you must only use the approved version…even for personal use by yourself…because you are not praying along with the Church…but I frankly don’t agree with that (again, for personal devotion) because each episcopal conference seems to prefer different versions for liturgies in their countries.

One other point, I wholeheartedly agree with you that the “updated” Scripture versions are far too long on political correctness and far too short on accuracy. That goodness for sites like Perseus, where one can actually see the original languages.

Are you familiar with the satire site, Eye of the Tiber?

They had a good spoof on this a couple of days ago:

***CAUTION: THE FOLLOWING IS SATIRE
****(The above disclaimer is inserted for the humor-impaired)
*[INDENT] St. Clare Press Ready To Publish New Non-confrontational Translation Of Bible

Cincinnati, OH––Catholic book publisher and distributer St. Clare Press announced today that their new non-confrontational translation of the Bible will be released sometime this September. St. Clare executive Roger Hammond told the press this week that he hopes the new translation helps to appease the minds of critics that have long called the Bible violent and judgmental. “It took close to a decade to complete this ambitious translation, and we’re confident it’ll help people better understand the all-encompassing compassion contained within the scriptures. Hammond goes on to explain one of the most riveting scenes in the New Testament where Jesus, after having overturned the tables of the money changers, goes back to help clean up, apologizing profusely as he does so. Another scene in which the compassion and kindness of Jesus shines forth is Matthew 16:23 where, after having been asked by Peter to not enter Jerusalem and eventually into the hands of the Pharisees, Jesus asks Peter to “hold that thought for a moment,” before addressing Satan; “Satan, if you wouldn’t moving just a tad bit behind me? I’d really like to get this little point across to Peter. I feel so rude asking you this, but…I mean don’t go out of your way or anything…” Hammond went on to tell reporters that the project has become a kind of therapy for all those involved in the project. One employee of St. Clare Press, Beverly Tomas, said that seeing Christ in a new, more tender, and compassionate way helped her get over years of abuse she suffered by “strict and judgmental nuns.” “I remember sitting back just a year ago and reading a newly translated verse in which the old Christ would’ve said something like “Woe to you, Pharisees, you hypocrites,” but now he gently places a hand on the shoulder of a Pharisee, pleadingly, and says,”Come on guys…I was gonna call you a whited-washed sepulchers, but honestly, I don’t think you’re a bad person…I just think maybe you’re hurting,” and lightly tapping the Pharisee on the chest, Jesus said unto him, “Hey, guy…you wanna know what I think? I think you’re hurting inside…hurting right there in that big ol’ heart of yours. Is that’s why you’re acting like this? Wanna talk about it?
[/INDENT]***CAUTION: THE PRECEDING WAS SATIRE
****(The above disclaimer is inserted for the humor-impaired)
*


#16

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