Modern Forms of Slavery: 12.3 million adults and children are in forced labor, bonded labor

Modern Forms of Slavery: 12.3 million adults and children are in forced labor, bonded labor, and forced prostitution around the world

How sad, Slavery is still going strong in the 21st Century and the mainstream media hardly, if ever cares about the subject.:shrug:

"Although much media attention is focused on trafficking for sexual ends, the State Department pointed out that more people are trafficked for forced labor than for commercial sex. Even so, traffickers often do use sexual violence as a way to coerce women in their work in fields or factories.

Some of the main findings of the 2010 report are the following:

-- 12.3 million adults and children are in forced labor, bonded labor, and forced prostitution around the world, with 56% of these victims being women and girls.
-- The value for traffickers of this trade is estimated at $32 billion annually.
-- The prevalence of trafficking victims in the world is calculated to be at the level of 1.8 per 1,000 inhabitants. This varies by region with it reaching 3 per 1,000 in Asia and the Pacific.
-- There were 4,166 successful trafficking prosecutions in 2009, a 40% increase over 2008.
-- There are still 62 countries that have yet to convict a trafficker under laws in compliance with the Palermo Protocol (a document adopted by the United Nations on human trafficking).
- No less than 104 countries are without laws, policies, or regulations to prevent victims' deportation."

Link to Slavery Article:

catholic.org/national/national_story.php?id=37054
By Father John Flynn, L.C.
6/22/2010

[quote="LookAWayDixieLd, post:1, topic:203050"]

How sad, Slavery is still going strong in the 21st Century and the mainstream media hardly, if ever cares about the subject.:

[/quote]

It gets reported on with somewhat regularity. For example, the agricultural slaves, typically homeless men, in Florida.
npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=125296794&ft=1&f=1057

The bulk of the museum is housed inside of a 24-foot box truck — a replica of the one used by the Navarrete family in Immokalee to hold twelve farmworkers captive from 2005 to 2007. The workers were beaten, chained and imprisoned inside of the truck, and forced to urinate and defecate in the corners. US Attorney Doug Molloy called the operation "slavery, plain and simple."

Inside of the truck visitors learn about seven cases of farm labor servitude in Florida successfully prosecuted by the US Department of Justice over the past 15 years. Workers were held against their will through threats, drugs, beatings, shootings, and pistol-whippings. These cases meet the high standard of proof and definition of slavery under federal laws and resulted in the liberation of over 1000 farmworkers — CIW worked with federal and local authorities during the investigation and prosecution of six of the seven cases.

What surprises me is the lack of public outrage.

[quote="Dale_M, post:3, topic:203050"]
It gets reported on with somewhat regularity. For example, the agricultural slaves, typically homeless men, in Florida.
npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=125296794&ft=1&f=1057

What surprises me is the lack of public outrage.

[/quote]

The National Public Radio article mainly talks about a traveling Slave Museum in an extended truck. I wonder why they did not go after actual numbers and do undercover work instead of a nebulous article like this. It would seem like the right thing to do.:shrug:

It would be interesting to see out of 12.3Mil how many are estimated to be in the US. Pope Benedict asks the host nations to treat Illegals with the same dignity which all God's children deserve.

I wonder why Mr. Obama has not put an end to this and give these people hope, weather they are on farms in Florida, meat packing plants in Iowa, garment sweatshops in New York City or Gardeners in California?:blush:

[quote="LookAWayDixieLd, post:4, topic:203050"]

I wonder why Mr. Obama has not put an end to this and give these people hope, weather they are on farms in Florida, meat packing plants in Iowa, garment sweatshops in New York City or Gardeners in California?:blush:

[/quote]

For the same reasons President Bush did not put a stop to it, or President Clinton, or the other President Bush, or President Reagan.... etc.

The very nature of the crime is secret. And because most of victims are often the lowest members of society, they have few resources (or inclination) to make their situation known. They simply want to get on with the life which was taken from them.

[quote="LookAWayDixieLd, post:4, topic:203050"]

I wonder why Mr. Obama has not put an end to this and give these people hope, weather they are on farms in Florida, meat packing plants in Iowa, garment sweatshops in New York City or Gardeners in California?:blush:

[/quote]

Mr. Obama is is too busy working on his next half-baked propaganda speech or passing bills that use the tax dollars of honest, hard-working people to butcher babies. He's just gonna brush the modern slavery issue under the rug and tell everybody the problem doesn't exist.

[quote="LookAWayDixieLd, post:1, topic:203050"]
Modern Forms of Slavery: 12.3 million adults and children are in forced labor, bonded labor, and forced prostitution around the world

How sad, Slavery is still going strong in the 21st Century and the mainstream media hardly, if ever cares about the subject.:shrug:

"Although much media attention is focused on trafficking for sexual ends, the State Department pointed out that more people are trafficked for forced labor than for commercial sex. Even so, traffickers often do use sexual violence as a way to coerce women in their work in fields or factories.

Some of the main findings of the 2010 report are the following:

-- 12.3 million adults and children are in forced labor, bonded labor, and forced prostitution around the world, with 56% of these victims being women and girls.
-- The value for traffickers of this trade is estimated at $32 billion annually.
-- The prevalence of trafficking victims in the world is calculated to be at the level of 1.8 per 1,000 inhabitants. This varies by region with it reaching 3 per 1,000 in Asia and the Pacific.
-- There were 4,166 successful trafficking prosecutions in 2009, a 40% increase over 2008.
-- There are still 62 countries that have yet to convict a trafficker under laws in compliance with the Palermo Protocol (a document adopted by the United Nations on human trafficking).
- No less than 104 countries are without laws, policies, or regulations to prevent victims' deportation."

[/quote]

And in 150 years the descendents of these modern day slavers will be telling people how they really didnt support slavery-they just defending their rights

[quote="estesbob, post:7, topic:203050"]
And in 150 years the descendents of these modern day slavers will be telling people how they really didnt support slavery-they just defending their rights

[/quote]

If you want to turn your head that is your choice and your conscience.

Heres a solution: enforce immigration laws. Enforce immigration laws and this wouldnt happen. Punish the immigrants by sending them back home where they belong. Punish the employers for hiring them and treating them like ****. You need respect for both laws. As long as they come here they will depress wages and there will always be someone to come along and take advantage. Secure the border and control who comes in and we wouldnt have these problems. Liberals have some problem with securing the border. Liberals have this fantasy world where there are no borders and as their slogan is "nobody is illegal". Our unemployment would go down if the illegals were deported and unemployed Americans took the jobs. We also need to stop giving visas to Pakistanis and Indians to come working here as CVS and Wal Mart workers. Until we have taken care of our own in our house we shouldnt be letting guests stay in our house and use the same resources the family needs to use.

[quote="Dale_M, post:5, topic:203050"]
For the same reasons President Bush did not put a stop to it, or President Clinton, or the other President Bush, or President Reagan.... etc.

The very nature of the crime is secret. And because most of victims are often the lowest members of society, they have few resources (or inclination) to make their situation known. They simply want to get on with the life which was taken from them.

[/quote]

But BO promised hope and change to the underclass and he has failed them in so many ways and so many times.

[quote="mjs1987, post:9, topic:203050"]
Heres a solution: enforce immigration laws. Enforce immigration laws and this wouldnt happen. Punish the immigrants by sending them back home where they belong. Punish the employers for hiring them and treating them like ****. You need respect for both laws. As long as they come here they will depress wages and there will always be someone to come along and take advantage. Secure the border and control who comes in and we wouldnt have these problems. Liberals have some problem with securing the border. Liberals have this fantasy world where there are no borders and as their slogan is "nobody is illegal". Our unemployment would go down if the illegals were deported and unemployed Americans took the jobs. We also need to stop giving visas to Pakistanis and Indians to come working here as CVS and Wal Mart workers. Until we have taken care of our own in our house we shouldnt be letting guests stay in our house and use the same resources the family needs to use.

[/quote]

What MJS said.

[quote="mjs1987, post:9, topic:203050"]
Heres a solution: enforce immigration laws. Enforce immigration laws and this wouldnt happen.

[/quote]

That is a bit of a magical solution, sort of like increasing federal revenue by "closing tax loopholes" and "eliminating fraud and waste." Can it actually be done? Partially, perhaps.

But even then, it wouldn't eliminate slavery in the US, because some are immigrants who come here on a visa and have their documents taken from them. And, as in the Florida farm slaves, some are homeless citizens of the US, or other persons on the fringes of society.

[quote="Dale_M, post:12, topic:203050"]
That is a bit of a magical solution, sort of like increasing federal revenue by "closing tax loopholes" and "eliminating fraud and waste." Can it actually be done? Partially, perhaps.

But even then, it wouldn't eliminate slavery in the US, because some are immigrants who come here on a visa and have their documents taken from them. And, as in the Florida farm slaves, some are homeless citizens of the US, or other persons on the fringes of society.

[/quote]

Again, what are the specific numbers in Florida? If their are 12.3Mil slaves in the world how many are in Fla. We know that only 50% of households in the US pay Federal Income Tax and these working families/people are in fact slaves of the Federal Gov.:shrug:

The Debit Clock helps quantify the Federal Gov. slavery of working families, their children and their grandchildren.

usdebtclock.org/

[quote="LookAWayDixieLd, post:13, topic:203050"]
Again, what are the specific numbers in Florida? If their are 12.3Mil slaves in the world how many are in Fla.

[/quote]

I don't know, perhaps no one knows, since slavery in this country is illegal and hidden from public view. Have you tried searching online for the information you want?

[quote="LookAWayDixieLd, post:13, topic:203050"]
We know that only 50% of households in the US pay Federal Income Tax and these working families/people are in fact slaves of the Federal Gov.

[/quote]

uh..... wow.

You are comparing paying taxes with being physically beaten, chained up, being forced to work and live under brutal conditions with no chance of escape?

I think that comparison makes light of actual slavery.

[quote="Dale_M, post:14, topic:203050"]

uh..... wow.

You are comparing paying taxes with being physically beaten, chained up, being forced to work and live under brutal conditions with no chance of escape?

I think that comparison makes light of actual slavery.

[/quote]

If you want to turn a blind eye to this type of slavery and ignore or discount it, that fine by me and others. It is your conscience.

[quote="LookAWayDixieLd, post:15, topic:203050"]
If you want to turn a blind eye to this type of slavery and ignore or discount it, that fine by me and others. It is your conscience.

[/quote]

Huh? Are you saying that paying taxes is unconscionable?

Mr. Obama may really want to pass legislation towards this end. The bigger question will the anti-immigrant forces in the media, "think tanks" (sic), foundations and the minority Republican Party desist from their obstructionist policies and help pass the legislation the bishops have long called for?

And while we're at it...can we please punish those lobbyists, employers, congress people who keep passing those darned free trade bills which export jobs, lower working conditions, pay lower wages and so forth that drive people out of their homelands?

I believe the 12.3 million is an underestimate. How many of them are in China? Indonesia? Sweatshop facilities in the Philippines and Honduras? You know. Where the stuff you get from WalMart gets made? Or the $150.00 pair of sneakers we buy from Nike?

This is the fruits of capitalism, 2010 style folks.

[quote="LookAWayDixieLd, post:1, topic:203050"]
How sad, Slavery is still going strong in the 21st Century and the mainstream media hardly, if ever cares about the subject.:shrug:

[/quote]

I've heard statistics and stories about these things all over the place. The MSM has reported on this stuff with on a somewhat regular basis. Not to mention, there was a blockbuster movie called Blood Diamond that showed the slavery that takes place to get us our diamonds.
The bigger issue is, why don't more people who hear/see these stories care?

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