Modern Scholastic Theologians?

Are there any modern scholastic theologians who are world-class theologians? Any modern “successors” to Lonergan, Maritain, Rahner, etc.? I’m not very familiar with any theologian who is under 80 years old.

Josef Pieper?

Rev. Robert Spitzer
Mika Aquilina
Scott Hahn
Karl Keeting
Edward Feser
Peter Kreeft
Bishop Robert Barron

Josef is of the same generation as Congar and essentially the others named by the original poster.

I am not sure exactly how to understand the question. I would not list Rahner as a Scholastic…of course Maritain, on the other hand, was at the vanguard of neo-Scholasticism in the aftermath of Aeterni Patris. Are you using the term Scholastic in the sense of Scholasticism or in the sense of a theologian whose life and work and focus is the academy?

One thinks of remarkable and superb theologians in the Scholastic tradition in the 20th century, like Arintero and Garigou-Lagrange, who were singular…as in every generation we have theologians of incredible gifts. Josef Ratzinger certainly belongs in that category as does Karol Wojtyla.

But I see great talent among the under 80 theologians…Wojciech Giertych certainly would be one, speaking of Scholasticism.

I do think the theologians who are at that level of intellectual gift are less prominent today in the public consciousness/public media – that is to say outside theological circles – in general than in the previous generation. That is more, however, because of the current generation and the contemporary circumstances as well as the fact that the great names of the previous generation had rather unique platforms to become as known as they were/are.

I think of the term “scholastic” referring more to philosophical viewpoint, rather than theology directly; someone whose method is more shaped by Thomas, as opposed to Augustine. Dr. Kreeft is a philosopher, though he has offered good theological insights for the general reader.

It may be that “scholastics”, or philosophers generally, are less well known or respected than 50 - 75 years ago. In the years after WWII, there was a temporary revulsion against relativism, and positivism; a brief period of deep respect for the Natural Law, and Absolutes of True/False, Right/Wrong. We had seen where relativism had led to, in Germany. Someone like Maritain would be respected in many scholarly circles, and somewhat admired even by many in the general public.

Today, well…

I’ve truly learned a lot by reading Dr. Edward Feser. He’s not world-class, etc. but his writings are very informative and helpful. He is the author of *Scholastic Metaphysics: A Contemporary Introduction * and Neo-Scholastic Essays.

Here is his blog. He links to other blogs and authors as well.

He also has an excellent reading list he shares on his blog:
Scholastic’s Bookshelf 1
Scholastic’s Bookshelf 2
Scholastic’s Bookshelf 3
Scholastic’s Bookshelf 4

I hope you find this helpful!

James Larson maybe?

Perhaps not, but he was heavily influenced by St. Thomas and scholastic thought as he himself had some speculative tendencies.

of course Maritain, on the other hand, was at the vanguard of neo-Scholasticism in the aftermath of Aeterni Patris. Are you using the term Scholastic in the sense of Scholasticism or in the sense of a theologian whose life and work and focus is the academy?

More the former.

One thinks of remarkable and superb theologians in the Scholastic tradition in the 20th century, like Arintero and Garigou-Lagrange, who were singular…as in every generation we have theologians of incredible gifts. Josef Ratzinger certainly belongs in that category as does Karol Wojtyla.

Joseph Ratzinger as a scholastic? :slight_smile: I know he said (paraphrasing from memory) in writing Jesus of Nazareth his intention was to produce something akin to what St. Thomas did in his Summa for the life of Christ. But can you count him? :hmmm:

But I see great talent among the under 80 theologians…Wojciech Giertych certainly would be one, speaking of Scholasticism.

Not familiar with him. :slight_smile:

I do think the theologians who are at that level of intellectual gift are less prominent today in the public consciousness/public media – that is to say outside theological circles – in general than in the previous generation. That is more, however, because of the current generation and the contemporary circumstances as well as the fact that the great names of the previous generation had rather unique platforms to become as known as they were/are.

Probably true.

Yes, the method, grounded in realism. :slight_smile: Too often I think “scholasticism” is identified with aristotelian philosophy, which I don’t think is necessarily true. Of course Aristotle can be helpful :slight_smile:

Today, well…

:sad_yes:

He does provide plenty of books and authors. :slight_smile:

Father Wojciech Giertych has been the papal theologian for over 10 years.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wojciech_Giertych

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