Mohammed is most popular name in Oslo


#1

For the first time in the capital city’s history, Mohammed is the common name for boys and men, said a study on Thursday.

thelocal.no/20140828/mohammed-is-most-popular-name-in-oslo


#2

Goodness, it’s ‘Mohammed’ time again.

The real guide to Muslim births is where Muslim girls’ names are in the list of favourite names because there’s a tradition/tendency to include Mohammed in a boy’s name set - Mohammed/Ali Mohammed/Omar Mohammed/Khalid Mohammed . . .

You get a lot of Mohammeds that way but you’ll find the Alis, Omars and Khalids quite a bit down the table of names chosen that year along with the Ayeshas, Fatimas on the girls’ side.


#3

Reminds me of the Muhammad Ali argument from Eddie Murphy’s Coming to America:

youtube.com/watch?v=sTz4I_hPm78


#4

The story is either true, or not.
Is there any evidence, outside of what comedians say, that it is not true?


#5

There are other possibilities - the story is true, for a given value of truth been one. A point Kaninchen raises, as she points out the tendency to include Mohammad in a large number of Muslim male names is very common. This is one of those stories that keep surfacing, usually it’s ‘Mohammad is the most common kids name in Britain’ but this is a newer variant of it.


#6

For that matter, then, the most common name in the Arab world actually seems to be “Ibn”. :hmmm:


#7

Which is also why I raise the issue of girls’ names, of course. There’s no parallel to the Mohammed situation in the UK top 100 girls’ names - typical Muslim girls’ names come quite low on the list each year (as do the boys’ names apart from Mohammed).


#8

Like the creationists have a set of arguments that they think are best avoided by supporters of creationism, I think the whole popularity of ‘Mohammed’ as a name business is one of those that “The Muslims are coming!!!” people ought to avoid.


#9

If every Methodist boy was named Frank- it would be the most common name in the US.


#10

Catholics naming children after Mary used to be extremely common, for both boys as well as girls. For example, Erich Maria Remarque, author of All Quiet on the Western Front.

That custom, at least in the US, has faded away. However, this doesn’t mean that other countries or religions do not maintain such tradition.


#11

It is also in the United Kingdom. It replaced Oliver.


#12

Oliver, huh? Did Oliver Twist or As You Like It make a comeback?


#13

Well, they could at least English-ize it… Hammy has a more English tone than MoHAMMed. Or Ham -its short like Sam. Why not Mo, short for MOhammed…? Or Ed…? Why not assimilate?


#14

Actually its pronounced ( Oliva). :wink: No but seriously…

dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2725724/How-Muhammad-popular-baby-boys-England-Wales-doesn-t-official-list-ways-spell-it.html


#15

It makes one yearn for the good old days when Norway was populated with young Abduls…:imsorry:


#16

That’s assimilation, that’s just pedantry. Many younger Muslims do use nicknames or short versions of their name by the way just like other groups. My wife is non English and refuses to let people use contractions of her name, I presume she is not ‘assimilating’ into the Borg like body of the modern UK. Nor must I be as I refuse to allow contractions of my name when I use it in it’s Irish form at times and I don’t care if HR departments etc. find it tough to spell either too much.


#17

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