Moral lessons of The Wizard of Oz?

What moral lessons have you drawn from this movie?

A gold standard doesn't work... Bryan for President!!

:)

[quote="EphelDuath, post:1, topic:200970"]
What moral lessons have you drawn from this movie?

[/quote]

We already have that which we truly need and desire, it just so often takes some stranger to see it within us. We are often blind to our own love, courage, wisdom and prudence.

[quote="Black_Rose, post:2, topic:200970"]
A gold standard doesn't work... Bryan for President!!

:)

[/quote]

LOL!!!:rotfl:

Epic

[quote="Black_Rose, post:2, topic:200970"]
A gold standard doesn't work... Bryan for President!!

:)

[/quote]

I don't know what's funnier, the reference, or the fact that I understood the reference :p

[quote="EphelDuath, post:1, topic:200970"]
What moral lessons have you drawn from this movie?

[/quote]

Wait, there was a moral lesson?

You can tell that I don't watch movies or read books for the lessons. Just for the entertainment.

If you're interested in the Wizard of Oz, I recommend this article which compares Dorothy's acceptance of home to other films such as It's A Wonderful Life and Star Wars:

You'll Never Get Out of Bedford Falls: The Inescapable Family in American Science-Fiction and Fantasy Films

Edit: Oh, I see you go to CUA. That's nice, I graduated from there last year.

[quote="Ducard, post:7, topic:200970"]
If you're interested in the Wizard of Oz, I recommend this article which compares Dorothy's acceptance of home to other films such as It's A Wonderful Life and Star Wars:

You'll Never Get Out of Bedford Falls: The Inescapable Family in American Science-Fiction and Fantasy Films

Edit: Oh, I see you go to CUA. That's nice, I graduated from there last year.

[/quote]

Interesting to note that in the book, she doesn't do that at all. In the book, the ending is more fancifully abrupt and much more vague, it is suggested it may not have been a dream at all. There is no "and you were there, and you" scene in the book, and the beginning was like wise expanded and altered in the film adaptation. Moral emphasis in the novel, is placed squarely on the scenes with the wizard and Glenda and how Dorathy learns she had the ability to go home right on her feet, without realising it... Whic is of cause the major Moral lesson of the entire story(and remains so in the film version, with an added moralistic ending about "home"). In the book she doesn't meet Glenda(or the wicked western Witch) till the final few climactic chapters.

never trust green women

[quote="_L, post:9, topic:200970"]
never trust green women

[/quote]

Isn't that a moral lesson of Star Trek as well? lol

I am sure the Wizard could be compared to false gods.

[quote="EphelDuath, post:1, topic:200970"]
What moral lessons have you drawn from this movie?

[/quote]

all houses in cyclone or hurricane zones should have tie-downs

the author of the book explained he had no subliminal political or moral message, and Hollywood is not in the morality business, either. "There's no place like home" is a sentiment, not a commandment of the decalogue.

[quote="puzzleannie, post:12, topic:200970"]
all houses in cyclone or hurricane zones should have tie-downs

the author of the book explained he had no subliminal political or moral message, and Hollywood is not in the morality business, either. "There's no place like home" is a sentiment, not a commandment of the decalogue.

[/quote]

It was not formally intended, but like most good stories, it is there in the underlying metaphors. It a moral story where the protagonists learn they had all the tools for a good life that they had desired. The message was that we are born with everything we ever truly need in life, it just so often takes an exposed fradulent repentant stranger of a wizard to see true magic working within us. Because we are oft blinded to our own virtues.

Ironically I just watched the Wizard of Oz two days ago. I hadn't seen it in years so I decided to watch it. I think the moral is that Dorothy, who at the beginning had wanted to run away from home and her problems realizes at the end that she needs home and it isn't the best thing to do to run away. Other than that, there really isn't to many morals. However, there are some great lines in there that have endured, especially the line that the "wizard" says when Toto exposes him, "Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain".

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