More loving to correct, than to pacify


#1

I believe it is more loving to correct someone when they are engaging in sin, than it is to encourage them in their right to engage in that sin. That’s because I believe what we do here on earth matters…and can affect our eternity.

Some of our same-sex-attracted brethren want state and Church approval for a lifestyle choice, and sadly some of their heterosexual friends are all to willing and happy to placate them in that choice and encourage them in sin out of “love” for them. But the truly loving thing to do would be to admonish and correct the sinner…and I think we should all want the same, no? Is it not more important to focus on our eternity, than to focus on what joy or pleasure we can reap from this earthly existence?

For more:
daves-ahumbleservant.blogspot.com/2013/07/are-we-more-concerned-with-earthly.html


#2

It’s an interesting question. And yes I do understand what you are saying here.
At the same time, I do wonder about exactly how far we need to take this.
Is it necessary for us to point out every time we see someone sinning? Friends, family, co-workers, strangers? does the gravity of the sin matter? Do we only point out serious sins? If so, i’m not sure we are qualified to determine if all the conditions have been met for someone else to have committed a mortal sin.

In perfect honesty, I think if we went around constantly pointing out the sins of others, we’d have no friends and possibly lose our jobs too. I do wonder where the line is drawn. I admit I don’t have the answers.


#3

Rachel126 #2
I think if we went around constantly pointing out the sins of others, we’d have no friends and possibly lose our jobs too. I do wonder where the line is drawn. I admit I don’t have the answers.

If we keep in mind what Our Lord and His Apostles taught in the Sacred Scriptures we shall come to know how to act – with love and concern for others and as witnesses to the truth.

It is vital to follow the command to judge all actions, speech, writing against truth and in this way we can help others by offering truth.

Christ and His Church’s Scriptures tell us:

“Stop judging by appearances, but judge justly.” (Jn 7:24).

“Beware of false prophets, who come to you in sheep’s clothing, but underneath are ravenous wolves. By their fruits you will know them” (Mt 7:15, 16).

“Every tree that does not bear good fruit will be cut down and thrown into the fire. So by their fruits you will know them.” (Mt 7:19-20).

“Test everything: retain what is good.” (1Thess 5:21).

“The spiritual person, however, can judge everything but is not subject to judgement by anyone.” (1 Cor 2:15).

“I, for my part, although absent in body but present in spirit, have already, as if present, pronounced judgement on the one who has committed this deed…” (1 Cor 5:3; read 1-13).

“I am speaking as to sensible people; judge for yourselves what I am saying.” (1 Cor 10:15).

“Beloved, do not trust every spirit but test the spirits to see whether they belong to God, because many false prophets have gone out into the world.” (1 Jn 4:1).

“I know your works; I know that you are neither cold nor hot. I wish you were either cold or hot. So, because you are lukewarm, neither cold nor hot, I will vomit you out of my mouth.” (Rev 3:16).

We may not judge motives, intentions, and guilt before God but are commanded to judge actions, speech, writing against truth and in this way we can help others by offering truth.

We can’t judge according to truth by being mesmerized by others and giving them adulation, but according to the teaching of Christ’s Church, Her Tradition and Her Scriptures.


#4

Brotherly correction is generally discussed within the faith; we have a duty to correct other Catholics/Christians when they sin.

Our obligation to correct non-believers is different. To them we preach the good news of the gospel of Christ. This involves naturally the message that all need forgiveness, but it is a more general message to be presented in a positive light. Few people are brought to faith by Christians admonishing them specifically. More people come to faith through the purpose and love it brings to their lives.

The problem for most gay people is not the lifestyle they lead (for arguably most do so in ignorance of it being objectively sinful), but that they have not yet embraced the message of the gospel. For many gay people it is a difficult message to hear, because so often it is preceded by condemnation. We should love them first, lead them as best we can to the gospel of Christ, and then worry about their specific sins.


#5

Abu put it beautifully. Keep in mind that I am referring to the one at the expense of the other. For example, in the matter of the same-sex marriage debate, even some Christians fight for the “rights” of their same-sex-attracted friends. But what they are really fighting for is a worldly comfort at the expense of bringing Truth to their friends. I would think that the proper action would be for the friend to say, “I do want for your happiness, but your eternal happiness is more concern to me, and so I cannot support you in fighting for this “right” of same-sex marriage…” (or something like that).

But yes, we must be aware of when we do and don’t have any grounds to admonish someone…and Scripture is a great guide for that, as are the promptings of the Spirit within us.


#6

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