Mormon / Masonic connection


#1

freemason.org/cfo/may_june_2001/mormon.htm

According to this Masonic source, “[font=Times New Roman]Mormonism and Freemasonry are so intimately interwoven and interrelated that the two can never be dissociated.”[/font]

It details the Masonic involvement of Joseph Smith’s family, from his upbringing to adulthood, and even at the time of his death.

It also explains some of the symbols common to both Freemasonry & the Mormon church, and follows the relationship between the two organizations from the beginning of the Mormon religion to present.


#2

From the Masonic link Panis Angelicas provided:

The rituals and symbolism of the Mormon church are claimed, by revelation, to come from the rituals of King Solomon’s temple and indeed a study of the Holy Scriptures brings many of these symbols to light and give support for the beginnings of our Craft.

What is the meaning of “Craft” here. Religion? As in witch***craft***? Like the Craft of Voodoo? Or does it simply mean a guild, as in the Middle Ages, the “craft” of silver smithing. Anybody know were the word “mason” (stone mason?) fits in?

I had never heard that Mormon rituals and symbolism are claimed to come from Soloman’s temple! Paul, did you know this?

It is not necessary to go into detail but simply state that shortly thereafter this uncivil, un-Masonic organization issued the untrue and dishonest assertion that the Mormon Temple Ceremony had been “borrowed” or “stolen” from Freemasonry. Such alleged claims were published by the Grand Lodge and kept alive in every manner possible until January 31, 1984, on which date the Grand Lodge of Utah repealed its long standing anti-Mormon resolution. As originally formulated, the false claim was made that the Mormon Temple Ceremony was so Masonic in structure that the Mormon Church was actually practicing clandestine Masonry.

Methinks it’s too late for denial. It’s well documented.:stuck_out_tongue:

JMJ Jay


#3

It’s well documented that Joseph Smith was a Mason and built Masonic lodges in the Mormon settlements. Mormons will downplay this, but the historical evidence is irrefutable. There are many parallels between Masonic rituals and Mormon temple ceremonies. That is also well documented. Most Mormons are unaware of this because they are never taught about Smith’s involvement in Free Masonry. To my knowledge, this is never a part of a church history lesson. Perhaps some of our LDS posters could enlighten us on this.


#4

[quote=Katholikos]I had never heard that Mormon rituals and symbolism are claimed to come from Soloman’s temple! Paul, did you know this?

[/quote]

Yes, just as the BOM portrays Old-Testament era Nephites circa 580 B.C. performing Christian baptism, laying on of hands for the gift of the Holy Ghost and other New Testament practices (like quoting the Pauline epistles), Mormons believe that Old Testament Hebrew temples (and early New Testament Christian Churches) performed the same Mason-like endowment ceremonies that take place in modern Mormon temples.

Mormons assume that the Catholic Church, as part of the Great Apostacy, removed the sacred Masonic elements from Christianity, and that what we know today as the Freemasons was all that was left of the true Christian temple ceremonies - until the “restoration”. They believe that Joseph Smith restored the temple rites in all their original Christian purity - complete with the secret hand grips, passwords and gruesome bloody penalties (throat slit, heart torn from the chest, and disembowelment) that Freemasons know.

Amazingly, they never make the logical inference that if Joseph Smith was a first Master Mason, and then invented the endowment ceremony to be nearly identical to the masonic degrees of initiation, that he probably “borrowed” the masonic rites and incorporated them into his new religion.
Weird, huh?
Paul


#5

After Freemasonry was introduced to Nauvoo, the lodge met in the upper room of Joseph Smith’s general store while the new Masonic hall was being built. This was dedicated by Hyrum Smith on April 5, 1844, and used by the church and community for many community activities. It is worth noting that in the restoration of Nauvoo, the Mormon Church restored the building and calls it “The Cultural Hall-Masonic Hall.”

An interesting side note on the influence that Masonry had in the life of the Mormons is the fact that the weather vane placed on the Nauvoo temple depicted an angel in priestly robes with the Book of Mormon in one hand and a trumpet in the other. The angel is wearing a cap on his head and above him are a square and compass.

And this, I found just rather amusing…

The Beehive is an emblem of industry and recommends the practice of that virtue. Joseph Smith adopted the Beehive as the church and community symbol and Brigham Young added it to his personal seal. In Utah, Brigham Young erected a large home surmounted by a gilded beehive. This came to be known as the Beehive house, it being the home of, at one, 13 of his wives. It might even have resembled one. Several of the Temples display the beehive prominently on both their interiors and exteriors. It is the sole heraldic device on the shield of the State Seal and Flag as well as the Seals of the University of Utah and Brigham Young University. Three beehives are the sole adornments of the tabernacle podium and the immense beehive atop the old Hotel Utah overlooks the valley. The word beehive and deseret are used in the area business so extensively that the native-born scarcely notes them. Even the sidewalks are adorned with a tile pattern of the honeycomb. On the Temple itself you will see inscribed several symbolic items, along with the beehive you will find the Sun, Moon, Stars (Shaped like the O.E.S. star), The all-seeing-eye and the clasped hands. Across the street on the Relief building is prominently display a sheaf of wheat. This close resemblance to our craft was used by Utah Freemasonry for years as one of the reasons to bar Mormons for becoming Masons.


#6

[quote=Panis Angelicas]And this, I found just rather amusing…
[/quote]

The word “deseret” first appears in the Book of Mormon. It is said to be the Reformed Egyptian word for “honeybee”. This reference to the honeybee, a common Masonic symbol, in the Book of Mormon is just one of many Masonic symbols it contains.

Here is another:

And there are also secret combinations, even as in times of old, according to the combinations of the devil, for he is the founder of all these things; yea, the founder of murder, and works of darkness; yea, and he leadeth them by the neck with a flaxen cord, until he bindeth them with his strong cords forever.

Part of one Masonic ceremony involves the new initiate being blind-folded and led about the room with a “flaxen cord” around his neck.

The BOM was written during a period of feverish anti-Masonic furor in upstate New York following the disappearance and supposed murder of a Master Mason who wrote a tell-all book about their ceremonies. The book of Mormon contains several anti-Masonic passages.

It was only later that Joseph learned the value of such “secret combinations” for assuring the secrecy and loyalty of his followers. Then he made Masonry with its blood oaths a part of his new religion.
Paul


#7

[quote=Katholikos]From the Masonic link Panis Angelicas provided:

What is the meaning of “Craft” here. Religion? As in witch***craft***? Like the Craft of Voodoo? Or does it simply mean a guild, as in the Middle Ages, the “craft” of silver smithing. Anybody know were the word “mason” (stone mason?) fits in?
[/quote]

The ‘received’ history of Freemasonry suggests it is a survival of a craft guild from medieval times, which began to accept honorary members as the craft of stonemasonry began to die out. Craft guilds in the medieval period received apprentices at a very tender age and so were responsible for catechising their members in the Christian faith. Often they used the tools of their trade to illustrate Christian ideas. Also, they often performed elaborate re-enactments of Biblical or quasi-Biblical events as a means of inculcating Christian knowledge. Often these pageants were more legendary than historical, along the lines of modern movies such as “Ben Hur”, “Quo Vadis” or “The Robe”. Remember that most Guilds worked on projects for the Church such as cathedrals, and so there was great desire for the workmen to be pious and devout. Many believe that the ‘rituals’ of Freemasonry are simply a survival of craft guild catechesis. Oddly, Freemasonry lost it’s explicitly Catholic Christian focus somehow. See John Robinson’s “Born in Blood” for an alternative theory which might explain how that occurred.

I had never heard that Mormon rituals and symbolism are claimed to come from Soloman’s temple! Paul, did you know this?

It would not be difficult for anyone to purchase a copy of *Duncan’s Masonic Ritual and Monitor, (*a paraphrase of Masonic ritual), from any bookstore and thereby learn that Masonic folklore and legend has ALWAYS taught that Freemasonry is the remnant survival of various pre-Christian guild-like associations, especially involving the construction of Solomon’s Temple. The entire Third Degree is the re-enactment of the murder of Hiram Abiff, chief architect of Solomn’s Temple, and the apprehension and punishment of his murderers. Joseph Smith pretty much made it clear that his Temple rituals were nothing more than the purification and restoration of Masonic rituals to their ‘original form’. As in the case of the King James Bible, Masonic ritual was believed to have been corrupted and to have lost many ‘plain and precious things’.

Many Mormons are Freemasons (though there was a ban on this in Utah for quite a time–by the Masonic Grand Lodge of Utah, btw), and the connection between Freemasonry and Mormonism has actually come up in Sunday School and Melchizedek Priesthood classes which I have attended. Mormons get cagey about the topic of course–they can’t publicly discuss the Temple rituals and discussions of Freemasonry get awfully close to the line.

[quote=Paul Dupre]The BOM was written during a period of feverish anti-Masonic furor in upstate New York following the disappearance and supposed murder of a Master Mason who wrote a tell-all book about their ceremonies. The book of Mormon contains several anti-Masonic passages.

It was only later that Joseph learned the value of such “secret combinations” for assuring the secrecy and loyalty of his followers. Then he made Masonry with its blood oaths a part of his new religion.
[/quote]

I’ll buy that.


#8

[quote=flameburns623]The ‘received’ history of Freemasonry suggests it is a survival of a craft guild from medieval times, which began to accept honorary members as the craft of stonemasonry began to die out.
[/quote]

The recieved history tends to leave out many important factors. Among them are John Dee, Rabbi Judah Lowe and Kabbalah.


#9

[quote=flameburns623]Mormons get cagey about the topic of course–they can’t publicly discuss the Temple rituals and discussions of Freemasonry get** awfully close** to the line.
[/quote]

[quote=St. James]The recieved history tends to leave out many important factors. Among them are John Dee, Rabbi Judah Lowe and Kabbalah
[/quote]

I’d like to know more about these…

Also, if Mormons are evangelizing door to door, is that considered “public discussion?” Would they be forbidden to discuss temple rituals with someone who they were trying to convert?

Can you give some examples of Temple rituals which mirror Masonic rituals?


#10

[quote=Panis Angelicas]I’d like to know more about these…

Also, if Mormons are evangelizing door to door, is that considered “public discussion?” Would they be forbidden to discuss temple rituals with someone who they were trying to convert?

Can you give some examples of Temple rituals which mirror Masonic rituals?
[/quote]

Temple rituals are–in Mormonspeak–sacred, not secret; and are not discussed even among themselves to any great degree outside of a Mormon temple. Mormon temples are closed to the general public (unlike their weekly worship in meetinghouses, aka wards or branches, their semi-annual conventions, and their periodic events at the Tabernacle or other historic places).

Websites exist which compare Mormon rituals to Masonic rituals. The chief problem I have with many of these it that they obviously get the Masonic ritual ‘wrong’ or borrow it from Duncan’s Masonic Ritual and Monitor, which is a paraphrase. I can only assume–I never myself ever sought to qualify for a Temple recommend nor entered the Temple except when it was open to the public prior to being dedicated–that there may be innacuracies in the Mormon ritual as well. How egregious these differences possibly are is going to be difficult to determine without some way to compare an ‘authentic’ to the ‘purportedly authentic’. Since Mormons won’t even discuss the Temple rituals with non-Mormons I have always deemed it the better part of valor NOT to spend overmuch time on the topic.

Only something like 20% of all Mormon converts ever go to the Temple at all and many only go once and never again. The attrition rate among Mormon converts is incredibly high–most drop out within 5 years. (On the other hand, most of them DON’T resign their membership. They simply become ‘invisible’. One can assume a certain percentage ‘reactivate’ their membership as time goes by).


#11

[quote=Panis Angelicas]I’d like to know more about these…

Also, if Mormons are evangelizing door to door, is that considered “public discussion?” Would they be forbidden to discuss temple rituals with someone who they were trying to convert?

Can you give some examples of Temple rituals which mirror Masonic rituals?
[/quote]

The Mormon missionaries will teach about baptism for the dead and eternal marriage, both of which are performed in temples and neither of which is secret. What they will never mention is the “endowment” ceremony, which is the one that is masonic and is secret.

The pre-1990 version of the endowment is the one I am familiar with - I left the LDS Church in 1986. During my 11 years as a Mormon, I attended the temple 9 times that I can recall. There were more masonic elements at that time than there are in the current version.

Many of the most offensive parts of the endowment (e.g.: blood oaths; making fun of Christian clergy and saying they are employed by Satan, etc.) have been removed so as not to scare away the converts.

But the core of the endowment is still masonic:

The initiates are taught 4 hand grips, 4 hand signs and 4 passwords. The initiates are taught that these are necessary “to pass by the angels that stand as sentinels” at the entrance to heaven. In the pre-1990 version, the first 3 signs, grips and passwords were accompanied by “penalties” for revealing them to the uninitiated - throat slit from ear to ear, heart torn from the chest, and disemboweling, respectively. The penalties have reportedly been removed since 1990.

The initiates also wear a white outfit with a robe, a green apron and a cap which is exactly like the ones the Masons wear in their ceremonies.

Then the initiates are led to a veil. The temple worker knocks 3 times with a mallet, announcing that “Adam, having been faithful in all things, wishes to converse with the Lord through the veil”.

Then a male veil worker on the other side of the veil (who represents God) reaches his hand through a hole in the veil, and the initiate gives the grips and passwords to the veil worker on the other side of the veil.

The 4th grip and password was given “upon the 5 points of fellowship”, a close embrace with the veil worker. The “5 points” were also removed in 1990, partly because some female initiates felt uncomfortable with the physical intimacy of the “5 points of fellowship” with the male veil workers.

Once the grips and passwords have been given correctly, “God” pulls the initiate by the hand through the veil into the “celestial room”.

If you know anything about masonic ritual, you will recognize the elements that are (or were) similar.

Hope this helps,
Paul


#12

Thanks. Yes, it’s helpful to have any information that sheds a little more light on the subject.
Two of my teenage sons have Mormon friends.
The friends are very congenial, always inviting my boys to go places, spend the night, etc.
Sometimes, it is to “plays,” which my son says are “lame,” but since his friend doesn’t want to let down his father, and doesn’t really want to have to be there, he asks my kid along to keep company. The friends, of course, have gorgeous teenage sisters, which may make the lame performances a bit more palatable…
When I have to explain the differences in beliefs and practices, I want to be well informed.


#13

[quote=Panis Angelicas]Thanks. Yes, it’s helpful to have any information that sheds a little more light on the subject.
Two of my teenage sons have Mormon friends.
The friends are very congenial, always inviting my boys to go places, spend the night, etc.
Sometimes, it is to “plays,” which my son says are “lame,” but since his friend doesn’t want to let down his father, and doesn’t really want to have to be there, he asks my kid along to keep company. The friends, of course, have gorgeous teenage sisters, which may make the lame performances a bit more palatable…
When I have to explain the differences in beliefs and practices, I want to be well informed.
[/quote]

Glad to be of help. My purpose in exposing the complexities of Mormonism is not so much to dissuade or convert Mormons, but to innoculate unsuspecting Catholics against the Mormon deception.
God bless you,
Paul


#14

Masons wear WHITE lambskin aprons.

Only the master of the lodge wears a hat.

No initiate wears a hat or a robe in craft masonry degrees.


#15

[quote=Panis Angelicas]I’d like to know more about these…

[/quote]

For the Cabalist influence you can look at Giordano Bruno, Pico della Mirandola and Johannes Reuchlin.

John Dee’s “Monas Hieroglyphics” lays the groundwork for Masonic thinking.

Man’s role as a “lofty figure endowed with powers of operating on the world,” of perfecting an as yet “imperfect” universe–that is the philosophy that these people set in motion and that the Church once strongly opposed.

Try “Occult Philosophy in the Elizabethan Age,” by Dame Francis Yates.


#16

While I am no admirer of Joseph Smith, Jr. nor the false religion he founded and which has deceived so many, I am also no admirer of articles containing serious accusations against a person and which does not cite credible citatations to support its scholarship.

If someone wants to show that Smith and other involved with the founding of Mormonism were masons, they should obtain better ammunition.


#17

[quote=Arch Stanton]While I am no admirer of Joseph Smith, Jr. nor the false religion he founded and which has deceived so many, I am also no admirer of articles containing serious accusations against a person and which does not cite credible citatations to support its scholarship.

If someone wants to show that Smith and other involved with the founding of Mormonism were masons, they should obtain better ammunition.
[/quote]

There’s no “ammunition” about it. It is very neutral common knowledge, but…

Here is a link to a site by an active Mason and former Mormon who has put together a tremendous amount of research into the Mormon-Mason connection.

masonicmoroni.com/

This one is also good:
phoenixmasonry.org/freemasonry_and_mormonism.htm

Both authors cite their sources and recommend several good histories, etc.

Paul


#18

PaulDupre,

Yes that is better.

Thank you.


#19

You’re welcome Arch.
God bless you,
Paul


#20

[quote=PaulDupre]There’s no “ammunition” about it. It is very neutral common knowledge, but…

Here is a link to a site by an active Mason and former Mormon who has put together a tremendous amount of research into the Mormon-Mason connection.

masonicmoroni.com/

This one is also good:
phoenixmasonry.org/freemasonry_and_mormonism.htm

Both authors cite their sources and recommend several good histories, etc.

Paul
[/quote]

Paul:

I checked out both sites: one that I was familiar with, one that’s new. The first one you listed is a legitimate Mason with some good scholarly insight ( considering that he’s an ex-Mormon).

Phoenixmasonry is not only clandestine ( not recognized by “regular” Grand Lodges), but it appears to be what we refer to as a “diploma mill” - for $ 25.00 one can “join” and presumably become a “Mason” ( albeit an “online” one). This is nonsense, and I would tend to avoid this site altogether.

Their web site also gave some very inaccurate information ( that Masonry in Utah- or in general has somehow “prohibited” Mormons from joining - this is utter nonsense. ** Masonry has** never taken an official stance on ANY religion as far as membership requirements go. ( That’s the part that probably irritates some of the more hardline among Catholics )

Prohibitions against Masonic membership always come from the short list of churches opposed to it - never from the Craft itself. If a man is of lawful age, is of good character, believes in a Higher Power, and is vouched for - he may petition a lodge for membership.

Masonicmoroni belongs to a recognized lodge, and seems to be quite well informed.

Ed King at www.masonicinfo.com/mormons.htm provides some solidly based information regarding not only Mormonism and its relationship to Masonry, but clearly points out that the people who usually deride Mormonism, berate Masonry as well - it’s an entertaining and candid overview.

Hope that this helps,

  • James

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