Mortal Sin and the Synod

I am now wondering if the request is realized to give communion to divorce and remarried Catholics, cohabitating couples, people having premarital sex and adulterous sex, and non celibate gay couples will it still be considered a mortal sin? I thought that a Catholic must approach the altar in a state of grace. Will these mortal sins now become venial sins in order that the priest and souls will not participate in additional sin?
Also the gay “gifts” description is disturbing. If someone has any gifts to offer it is through their dignity as a child of God not through their sexual orientation, especially concerning a disordered one. Does that mean that pedophiles have “gifts” to offer us too? How exactly do we go about valuing these so called gay gifts. Truthfully I don’t go around asking about someone’s sex life as it pertains to my association with them.
Also I am astounded that a cohabitating couple’s relationship is now to be on par with people who are actually married. That goes for divorced and remarried too. Those couples made a decision to not marry or marry without an annulment. They knew full well going into the situation that communion would be denied. If they want to change that situation it again is their choice. Get married , get annulled or stop having sex. Plain and simple. If we give them communion there is no motivation to change. Why would they change if they get the gold medal anyway? None of this makes any sense and is actually contrary to true mercy. Jesus said I forgive you but go and sin no more. We have heard precious little about the go and sin no more part of that commandment. The whole idea is also demeaning to those of us who are carrying our cross and trying to live the good Catholic life. Thanks for nothing.

Maybe you should wait and see what actually happens? Instead of assuming the impossible?

Also the gay “gifts” description is disturbing. If someone has any gifts to offer it is through their dignity as a child of God not through their sexual orientation.

That’s exactly the point. We are not defined by our sexual orientation. All people have gifts. What’s disturbing is that you would think otherwise.

Also I am astounded that a cohabitating couple’s relationship is now to be on par with people who are actually married. That goes for divorced and remarried too.

The synod’s not even over, and they’ve made that an official announcement? Could you provide a link, please, I think most of us must have missed that.

I agree with Agnes Therese that you are better off waiting and seeing. There’s a lot of misinformation and misunderstanding about the synod. The sky is not falling at the current moment, as much as the press might lead you to that conclusion.

First, don’t expect any pronouncements of any kind any time soon. The synods are consultative, not legislative. They offer suggestions to the Pope who then generally uses those suggestions to compose a post-synodal apostolic exhortation.

This synod is a bit unique in that it is simply laying the ground work for the next synod which will take place in October 2015. So all of the discussion at this synod, will result in a text that will be released probably some time next week. That text will simply serve as a point of discussion for the bishops to talk about over the next year leading into the next synod. At next year’s synod, they will talk some more and most likely draft a series of propositions which they will vote on and pass on to the Holy Father who will draw from them (probably) for his apostolic exhortation on the family which will likely come out in 2016 or 2017. That is if things follow the usual pattern. The Pope could ignore the synod’s propositions entirely (though it’s hard to imagine he would).

It is that document which will be the one we need to pay attention to. Anything before that is just part of the process. It may be interesting to watch, but it doesn’t change anything.

All this said, it seems you might have a few misconceptions about what some are proposing. Not even Cardinal Kasper is asking for some blanket allowance of Communion for all those who are divorced and remarried – let alone those in other such irregular relationships. He is more or less posing the question as to whether it might be allowed to certain couples in certain circumstances. So even if things go that direction (which I don’t think they will as I don’t see how it could), it won’t mean that those in mortal sin can receive Communion. Indeed, their entire argument seems to presuppose that those in mortal sin cannot receive Communion. What they are essentially arguing is that certain couples in certain circumstances could receive absolution and then be able to receive Communion. In other words, they would be able to be forgiven of the sin, and yet retain the second marriage (complete with sexual intimacy) without incurring further mortal sin.

If you think that doesn’t make much sense, join the club. :stuck_out_tongue:

Gravely sinful matters are* not *going to become “venial” matters.

Nor should one approach Holy Communion in such a state.

:thumbsup:

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