Mortal sin


#1

Can a sin be mortal if your not 100% sure it’s mortal or not and can a sin be counted against you if while you were committing the sin you did not know it was wrong


#2

To be a mortal sin ALL 3 OF THESE CRITERIA MUST BE MET-

  1. It must be grave matter

  2. You must know it is grave matter

  3. You willingly do it anyway, knowing that it is grave matter.

If ALL 3 of these things do not apply, there is no mortal sin.


#3

So, just to clarify if your not sure it’s a mortal sin…it’s not a mortal sin


#4
  1. When does one commit a mortal sin?

1855-1861
1874

One commits a mortal sin when there are simultaneously present: grave matter, full knowledge, and deliberate consent. This sin destroys charity in us, deprives us of sanctifying grace, and, if unrepented, leads us to the eternal death of hell. It can be forgiven in the ordinary way by means of the sacraments of Baptism and of Penance or Reconciliation.

  1. When does one commit a venial sin?

1862-1864
1875

One commits a venial sin, which is essentially different from a mortal sin, when the matter involved is less serious or, even if it is grave, when full knowledge or complete consent are absent. Venial sin does not break the covenant with God but it weakens charity and manifests a disordered affection for created goods. It impedes the progress of a soul in the exercise of the virtues and in the practice of moral good. It merits temporal punishment which purifies.

vatican.va/archive/compendium_ccc/documents/archive_2005_compendium-ccc_en.html

%'s do not normally figure into things.

We are to examine our conscience and if we are conscious of having committed a mortal sin we are to confess it in number and kind (and circumstance that changes the kind --like it is your brother you murdered).

If we think something may be a mortal sin --one is to not do it --but inform/form ones conscience and then act accordingly.

Now some out there struggle with scruples and are for example given various principles by their regular confessor -- to help them over come their scruples (which are unfounded fears basically of something being a sin or mortal sin etc etc). They need to have a regular confessor to guide them and they may be in a different boat than others on the way to approach certain matters.


#5

Thank you much for the answer, I have another question are your venial sins forgiven when you receive Eucharist?


#6

Venial sins can be forgiven in many various ways (prayer, acts of contrition, acts of love, devote use of holy water etc etc). Including at Holy Communion. But it is recommended to confess venial sins as well.


#7

Catechism:

1458 Without being strictly necessary, confession of everyday faults (venial sins) is nevertheless strongly recommended by the Church.59 Indeed the regular confession of our venial sins helps us form our conscience, fight against evil tendencies, let ourselves be healed by Christ and progress in the life of the Spirit. By receiving more frequently through this sacrament the gift of the Father's mercy, we are spurred to be merciful as he is merciful:60

Whoever confesses his sins . . . is already working with God. God indicts your sins; if you also indict them, you are joined with God. Man and sinner are, so to speak, two realities: when you hear "man" - this is what God has made; when you hear "sinner" - this is what man himself has made. Destroy what you have made, so that God may save what he has made. . . . When you begin to abhor what you have made, it is then that your good works are beginning, since you are accusing yourself of your evil works. The beginning of good works is the confession of evil works. You do the truth and come to the light.61


1436 Eucharist and Penance. Daily conversion and penance find their source and nourishment in the Eucharist, for in it is made present the sacrifice of Christ which has reconciled us with God. Through the Eucharist those who live from the life of Christ are fed and strengthened. "It is a remedy to free us from our daily faults and to preserve us from mortal sins."35

1437 Reading Sacred Scripture, praying the Liturgy of the Hours and the Our Father - every sincere act of worship or devotion revives the spirit of conversion and repentance within us and contributes to the forgiveness of our sins.


1394 As bodily nourishment restores lost strength, so the Eucharist strengthens our charity, which tends to be weakened in daily life; and this living charity wipes away venial sins.231 By giving himself to us Christ revives our love and enables us to break our disordered attachments to creatures and root ourselves in him

scborromeo.org/ccc/p2s2c1a3.htm#VI


#8

One is of course to confess mortal sins (prior to Holy Communion) --but what about "doubtful mortal sins".

As to "doubtful mortal sins" (like I am doubtful if I gave complete consent to it...) --while there is not a strict obligation to confess such -- the general recommendation (a general rule for most) is that those of an ordinary conscience should confess them (noting they are doubtful) and especially those of a lax conscience (again noting the doubt).

Those who struggle with scruples are often rather recommended to not confess them directly (if they do they too would not it is doubtful). They ought to have a regular confessor to assist them.


#9

[quote="Oneofthewomen, post:2, topic:306389"]
To be a mortal sin ALL 3 OF THESE CRITERIA MUST BE MET-

  1. It must be grave matter

  2. You must know it is grave matter

  3. You willingly do it anyway, knowing that it is grave matter.

If ALL 3 of these things do not apply, there is no mortal sin.

[/quote]

It only requires one or more of the three criteria not to apply for it not to be a mortal sin. It does not require all three to not apply.


#10

[quote="Finnthehuman, post:1, topic:306389"]
Can a sin be mortal if your not 100% sure it's mortal or not and can a sin be counted against you if while you were committing the sin you did not know it was wrong

[/quote]

If you are not 100% sure it is mortal, that means that you have some level of knowledge that it may, indeed, be mortal. If you believe that it might be mortal, why would you go ahead and commit it? That is like playing with fire!

You want to do something. You know it is a sin, but are not certain that it is a mortal sin. Well, do some research, check a number of examinations of conscience, look it up in the Catechism of the Catholic Church, ask a good priest - but do not do it. We should be doing our best to not commit any deliberate sin, whether venial or mortal. Why take advantage of our doubt? Do we clearly know that we really doubt, or are we fooling ourselves? It is so easy to fool ourselves! To say to our self "I am not certain that that is a mortal sin, particularly under my circumstances".....

When you know it is a mortal sin - do not do it. When you are not sure - do not do it. And if you did it and then had doubts, confess it anyway. Let the priest or God determine whether you were fooling yourself.


#11

In order for a sin to be mortal there has to be grave matter and you have to know that it is gravely sinful and you have to freely choose to do it anyway.

stay away from mortal sin


#12

On thin ice here. If you have considered the possibility of an action being a mortal sin, why would you go ahead and committ the action?

Frequently decisions are not 100% certain for us in this life. If we are listening to God and praying, we hopefully do not make rash and compulsive decisions to sin. Our consciences can guide us if they are well formed.

Sin is a break in our relationship with God. As an analogy, if you cheat on your wife in the passion of the moment, you can surely claim ignorance in some area:
“I didn’t think about the gravity of my actions, I was overcome by lust”
"I thought one time would be ok, my wife was gone on vacation, we’re fighting, I deserve some fun, etc etc etc…

The response of your wife to each of these excuses will prolly be, “goodbye”, which is the consequence of sin, whether it is intended or fully informed. Whether or not the technicalities come down on your side, you have a rupture in the relationship.

For me, these issues are moot. I have done many things out of stupid ignorance and separated myself from God’s love. Whether or not they are technically mortal sin, I confessed them as if they are mortal, cause they did indeed cause me to die inside. My relationship with God is not built on honoring technicalities, but on a committment of my whole self.


#13

If you did not know it was wrong your culpability is greatly diminished. If you are having doubts, mention it in confession and leave it to the mercy of Jesus.
:slight_smile:


#14

What do you cupality?


#15

[quote="clem456, post:12, topic:306389"]
On thin ice here. If you have considered the possibility of an action being a mortal sin, why would you go ahead and committ the action?

Frequently decisions are not 100% certain for us in this life. If we are listening to God and praying, we hopefully do not make rash and compulsive decisions to sin. Our consciences can guide us if they are well formed.

Sin is a break in our relationship with God. As an analogy, if you cheat on your wife in the passion of the moment, you can surely claim ignorance in some area:
"I didn't think about the gravity of my actions, I was overcome by lust"
"I thought one time would be ok, my wife was gone on vacation, we're fighting, I deserve some fun, etc etc etc....

The response of your wife to each of these excuses will prolly be, "goodbye", which is the consequence of sin, whether it is intended or fully informed. Whether or not the technicalities come down on your side, you have a rupture in the relationship.

For me, these issues are moot. I have done many things out of stupid ignorance and separated myself from God's love. Whether or not they are technically mortal sin, I confessed them as if they are mortal, cause they did indeed cause me to die inside. My relationship with God is not built on honoring technicalities, but on a committment of my whole self.

[/quote]


#16

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