Mother Teresa, abortion, and cancer


#1

I have no idea what forum this question belongs in so I apologize if it goes somewhere else.

I'm trying to confirm a story someone told me about Mother Teresa. Supposedly while Mother Teresa was still alive, someone once asked her why God hadn't sent a doctor to find a cure for cancer. Mother Teresa is said to have replied that she once asked God that question, and He told her that He had sent a doctor into the world to discover the cure for cancer. However, the doctor was aborted as a baby.

If there is any truth to this story, it's obviously a major selling point for the pro-life movement, particularly when you're trying to defend the right to life to people who aren't religious or who think the world is overpopulated.

Thanks for any information or confirmation you can offer.


#2

I don't see why God would send a single person to cure cancer in the first place. Cardiovascular diseases account for more deaths than cancer does, and many many forms of cancer are actually highly preventable.

If God were to send someone to cure us of anything, wouldn't abortion itself be FAR more important? Maybe the end of war, or pornography, divorce, or adultry?

Anyway, even if it were true, I don't really see it as being a selling point, as it would fall under the status of private revelation (you don't have to believe it) it would also be a PR from someone who is Blessed, not Canonized.

I hope that didn't sound too negative, but I do have problems with the idea.


#3

[quote="opera, post:1, topic:230883"]
I have no idea what forum this question belongs in so I apologize if it goes somewhere else.

I'm trying to confirm a story someone told me about Mother Teresa. Supposedly while Mother Teresa was still alive, someone once asked her why God hadn't sent a doctor to find a cure for cancer. Mother Teresa is said to have replied that she once asked God that question, and He told her that He had sent a doctor into the world to discover the cure for cancer. However, the doctor was aborted as a baby.

If there is any truth to this story, it's obviously a major selling point for the pro-life movement, particularly when you're trying to defend the right to life to people who aren't religious or who think the world is overpopulated.

Thanks for any information or confirmation you can offer.

[/quote]

Maybe it was Mother Teresa's way of stating her priorities.


#4

The problem is that God is removed from the equation today. Today "the state" is the new God and whatever "the state" decides is fact and must be obeyed. Dictatorship of relativism, and people allowing the government to have way more power than it should. If there is no God then there was no vision and people can do as they please because everyone alive today will all be dead 150 years from now anyway, with no hope of an afterlife.


#5

No, because people like that will never take a religious figure like Mother Theresa seriously anyway. They would just scoff at that story.

Of course there are a lot of people missing - 53 million just in the United States, let alone China! So within that missing population would have been many doctors, researchers, inventors, etc. who might have discovered cures for diseases, new sources of energy, new treatments for deformities, etc. etc. etc. We will never know, because they were aborted.

:frowning:


#6

Although it is a nice sentiment, and I agree with it in a sense, it is very easy for pro-abortion people to refute. They would simply respond (and have), “but think how many rapists, murderers, criminals etc. have been prevented!”

In reality, both arguments might have some truth, but the winning point for pro-life people should be that abortion is not crime prevention – a far greater evil is sustained in the killing of innocent life.


#7

I don't like that argument b/c to me it is the "child prodigy pressure" approach. That says that someone's life is valuable for what they do instead of who they are and they deserve special attention if they can make an exceptional contribution. Although I do think as a 'what might have been' that argument raises some interesting questions.


#8

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