Music during Eucharistic adoration


#1

Something I have been thinking about for awhile:

At the Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament Holy Thursday evening at our church, about 1/2 hour into my meditation a person in the back of the room started playing a guitar and singing softly. I believe he was singing in Spanish but he was singing so softly that I couldn’t really tell. It was very reverently done but a bit distracting at first because it was such a surprise. Just wondering, it this a Hispanic tradition?

On a related note would it be offensive to anyone if I discretely listened to music and prayers on my I-Pod during private devotion before the Blessed Sacrament? Before you raise your eyebrows too high… How would that be different from reading scripture or a written devotion? I have poor eyesight and find it very hard to read in the subdued lighting of the Eucharistic Chapel.


#2

I actually think the guy singing in adoration is quite moving–then again it’s never happened to me and I’m sure would find it distracting too. (I’m not Hispanic though so I really have no clue if that’s any kind of cultural tradition.)

I would not be offended in the least. Adoration is one of those things where everyone does it differently. Music/ipod is just your way. I, myself, have always greatly preferred silent contemplative prayer in Adoration, while some people either struggle staying focused or have to be tied down to to even try anything but rosaries and reading. I’m sure people see me and think that I’m just staring off into space, but I’m not; I’m praying the way that works best for me. The fact that you would even be there and acting appropriately (i.e., Adoring, not talking or dancing around or whatever) in the first place should demonstrate to your fellow adorers that you have reverence for the Blessed Sacrament.

I can (sort of) relate to your story: I walk to and from Mass and often listen to DivineOffice.org LotH podcasts or Christian music as I walk. I get more out of the Mass when I do these things, and it’s not like like I listen to my ipod in church. Still, I put on my earbuds a few footsteps out the church doors and get plenty of dirty looks from older folks thinking I’m just another Gen-Y-er who’s too addicted to her technology (sigh).


#3

I don’t know how appropriate it was, but I still think it was beautiful. Our church has three hours of Eucharistic Adoration on Sunday mornings and the last half hour we play the Divine Mercy Chaplet in song. It’s understood that this happens every week and no one feels that this is a problem. In fact, we have some people who actually come specifically for the chaplet. It’s very powerful.


#4

I don’t know how appropriate it was, but I still think it was beautiful. Our church has three hours of Eucharistic Adoration on Sunday mornings and the last half hour we play the Divine Mercy Chaplet in song. It’s understood that this happens every week and no one feels that this is a problem. In fact, we have some people who actually come specifically for the chaplet. It’s very powerful.


#5

I am Spanish and so far as I know it really depends on where you’re from. Where I’m from in Spain (Asturias) we are very prone to singing (sometimes the music might get to be a bit much for people who aren’t accustomed to this when during a special celebration we even bring bagpipes into the church) whereas where my grandfather is was born (León) they are much more sober. During the adoration of the Holy Sacrament though, that’s usually not the case. We tend to limit ourselves to singing the Tantum Ergo. But as I say it really depends on the country and the region.


#6

depends on the “rules” at the given parish. If this was during the time the Blessed Sacrament is exposed for anyone to come in, the rules generally ask for silence. If this was a planned Holy Hour for the whole parish, it is permissible to have some readings, rosary, appropriate music, but even so the greater proportion of the time should be devoted to silent adoration.

If it was this person’s scheduled hour for adoration and he is used to being alone it may be just the way he prays, which is fine, but if there are going to be others present the “rules” should state clearly when there may be music, public recitation of the rosary etc… Same with use of the i-pod as long as the noise was not audible I would simply assume someone is listening to sacred music, or has bible readings or a sacred book downloaded. There should be no need for any such support during Mass, however. Ask your church to get TTY or other technology to assist the hard of hearing if that is an issue.


#7

I don’t like music during adoration. Whenever I go with confirmation class, they usually play Christian rock, and i find that distracting. Now, I LOVE listening to more classical religious music, like Monteverdi’s Vespers. I listen to that while I write in my spiritual diary.

I have my prayers on my Zune: Chaplet of Divine Mercy in song, the rosary, Moteverdi, and religious music. I don’t see anything wrong with listening to it during adoration.

-Jeanne


#8

:thumbsup:I like that sort of music too. i’d also find Christian rock music to be distracting during Adoration, it’s such a ‘quiet’ time for me and i wouldn’t be able to concentrate.


#9

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