Muslims call for removal of baptism preference in schools


#1

rte.ie/news/2016/0115/760610-muslims-baptism-schools/


#2

My opinion, it is a school run by the Catholic Church. The Holy See is a UN member. We wouldn’t be calling for Muslim schools run by Iran or Saudi Arabia in, say America, to allow non-Muslims in.

That’s a violation of religious liberty


#3

**…“But organisers are unhappy that Catholic schools which are fully subscribed are turning away children who are not baptised.”
**
Why do they want to send their children to Catholic schools? Nothing wrong with Catholic schools showing preferential treatment to Catholic children.

Don’t they have muslim schools?


#4

Boy, they really have our politically correct number. They’ll probably get what they want too unfortunately.


#5

Jharek,
Explain this. Are there Muslim schools, as well? If so, are there requirements of students that are unique to Islam?
For example, are girls required to wear a head covering ?

(see where I’m going with this?) :wink:

Jon


#6

They are state schools, the Irish state school system heavily involves the Church in a rather unique way as compared to any other nation in Europe. The issue they are raising is actually one that is becoming a problem with regards to numerous non-Catholic groups in Ireland as the article mentions.


#7

Jon in Ireland the Church has an unique involvement and relationship with the state school system due to the vagaries of history and the majority of primary schools are Catholic but also state funded.

I imagine there may be one or two Muslim schools in Ireland as Ireland has around about 40,000 Muslims but I would have to google that to find out.


#8

Do they expect Catholic schools to turn into public schools just for them? They should leave the schools alone.


#9

These ARE public schools Confiteor and not private ones. Although of course confusingly enough in Ireland and the UK when we say ‘public school’ we mean a private one. However these are state schools and part of state system of education.


#10

At least in America, it would cause a media firestorm if we tried to pull a Muslim school’s funding.


#11

This is not happening in America and to understand the situation I would suggest you google up a quick few articles on the national school system of Ireland. Whilst it’s insanely more complicated than those articles can ever explain it will explain why Muslim and and other non-Catholic parents are running into conflicts with this schools as it was never envisaged when they were set up that were would be so much inward migration to Ireland as there has been in the last 20 odd years or so.


#12

Thanks, Jharek.

Jon


#13

From what I’ve read, as of 2010, 91% of the primary schools in Ireland are Catholic Schools.

The Irish government provides funding, but they are run by their local dioceses.

As of 2010, are 2 Muslim schools in all of Ireland.

I’m sorry, but the answer isn’t to end the Catholic School system. But they can create more Muslim schools or secular schools.

It’s not the Church’s fault that the Irish education system is dependent on the Church


#14

Actually they are state schools and were never really intended to be single denomination schools but became so by default over time. They were originally set up under British rule as multi-denominational but that faded away over the century and a half since the National School system was set up. Now it’s something of a mess and with increased migration inward and growing secularisation in Ireland it’s becoming something of a confused mess.


#15

I think they have a valid argument. I like the idea of state-funded religious schools, though this does bring a whole new set of problems to the forefront. There must be a balance between religious identity and societal needs. Also, even though they are ran with a religious identity, those attending should not be only those of that religion. Separate but equal is also fraught with difficulty, as we well know.


#16

From the article: “But organisers are unhappy that Catholic schools which are **fully subscribed **are turning away children who are not baptised.”

What does “fully subscribed” mean? Because istm that students might be being turned away because the school is full?


#17

Do you think that public opinion in Ireland will turn against continuing to allow the Catholic Church to have a privileged position in running state schools in Ireland if it is felt to be discriminating against non-Catholics or non-Christians in any way or giving preferential treatment to Catholic students?


#18

Baptized means all Christian denominations who baptize in the Name of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit; according to Catholic theology.


#19

What about children that are not baptized and have atheist parents? There must be some of those too that are having problems with these schools.

Also on this issue, I remember reading a story where the local Catholic bishop actually suggested to a Hindu parent that he have his child baptized so that it could get admitted into the nearby Catholic run state school.


#20

It sounds like the state funding could be the central problem here…


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