Must Lectors Read from the Lectionary?


#1

During Mass, may the Lector read from the “Lector’s Manual” instead of from the Lectionary? My understanding is no, but the Lectors say it is easier to read from the Manual because some words are bolded, etc.

Thank you.


#2

[quote="Luz_Maria, post:1, topic:342090"]
During Mass, may the Lector read from the “Lector’s Manual” instead of from the Lectionary? My understanding is no, but the Lectors say it is easier to read from the Manual because some words are bolded, etc.

Thank you.

[/quote]

The only book that should be on the lectern is the lectionary. Why would anyone need to read from anything else? A "Lector's Manual" is only to help the lector prepare for reading from the proper book.


#3

I do diocean lector training and get that question all the time. They say if they use the Workbook or a missalette they can mark it up. My answer is that they should be so prepared to read that they do not need cues marked in a book.

But most importantly, the Lectionary for the Lector, is akin to Book of Gospels for the deacon, and the chalice and paten for the priest. It is a sacred book that contains the Word of God and even though most people do not actually see the book on the ambo, it is a symbol that the Word being proclaimed is sacred and deserves honor. To bring up a workbook, a missallette or a piece of paper shows that what is being read can be thrown away, is not that important.

They don't always agree with me when I say that, but that is what we teach and when I was in charge of lectors I insisted on it. Even when children were reading or at a wedding or funeral which is a common time for people to bring up papers to read from. I would put a sticky to mark the pages when people who weren't lectors would get up to read. Some of them would still bring up papers crumbled up in their pocket (aggrrrr) but by that point there was nothing I could do. But that is at a funeral or wedding. For a parish Mass I certainly would speak to the lector and ask them not to do it again. The only time I would allow someone to read from a paper was if the lector had severe vision problems and even then I would put it in a liturgical decorative binder.


#4

[quote="Joan_M, post:2, topic:342090"]
The only book that should be on the lectern is the lectionary. Why would anyone need to read from anything else? A "Lector's Manual" is only to help the lector prepare for reading from the proper book.

[/quote]

I would agree in general principle, but we were on a mission trip to Africa once and had a long departure delay. Our pastor broke out his Mass kit and said Mass on the plane :thumbsup:

The readings (and even the Gospel) were done out of a Magnificat.


#5

[quote="Brendan, post:4, topic:342090"]
I would agree in general principle, but we were on a mission trip to Africa once and had a long departure delay. Our pastor broke out his Mass kit and said Mass on the plane :thumbsup:

The readings (and even the Gospel) were done out of a Magnificat.

[/quote]

That was the best under the circumstances!


#6

[quote="Luz_Maria, post:1, topic:342090"]
During Mass, may the Lector read from the “Lector’s Manual” instead of from the Lectionary? My understanding is no, but the Lectors say it is easier to read from the Manual because some words are bolded, etc.

Thank you.

[/quote]

When I attended a workshop for Lectors in training, we were told that we need to read the reading we are assigned to read for Sunday every day, and to meditate on it, calling on the Holy Spirit to help us.

When you arrive at Mass that day pray to the Holy Spirit for your delivery of God's Word, and also for the hearts of all in the congregation to be blessed in a special way by hearing it.

That will prepare us to do the reading properly.,


#7

[quote="Dorothy, post:6, topic:342090"]
When I attended a workshop for Lectors in training, we were told that we need to read the reading we are assigned to read for Sunday every day, and to meditate on it, calling on the Holy Spirit to help us.

When you arrive at Mass that day pray to the Holy Spirit for your delivery of God's Word, and also for the hearts of all in the congregation to be blessed in a special way by hearing it.

That will prepare us to do the reading properly.,

[/quote]

^^^This :thumbsup:

And if there are names in the readings that you don't know how to pronounce, you should have a resource (or a resource person) that you can consult so that you can pronounce them correctly without stumbling. We have a deacon who insists that the beggar at the rich man's gate was named "Lazareth," and when it comes time to read the genealogy in the 1st chapter of Matthew, I want to plug my ears.

Bottom line -- prepare with other books during the week, read from the lectionary on the day.


#8

We were all given a pronunciation list....and were told by a wise priest if we forget how to pronounce it when we are up there to just bluff, doing your best, and sound confident. :)


#9

Quote:

[quote="Joan_M, post:2, topic:342090"]
The only book that should be on the lectern is the lectionary. Why would anyone need to read from anything else? A "Lector's Manual" is only to help the lector prepare for reading from the proper book.

[/quote]

I agree! However, I went to the U.S.C.C.B. website and could not find the actual word “Lectionary”. These people are a bit “legalistic”. I am not a lawyer at all.

Quote from Joannm:
But most importantly, the Lectionary for the Lector, is akin to Book of Gospels for the deacon, and the chalice and paten for the priest. It is a sacred book that contains the Word of God and even though most people do not actually see the book on the ambo, it is a symbol that the Word being proclaimed is sacred and deserves honor. To bring up a workbook, a missallette or a piece of paper shows that what is being read can be thrown away, is not that important. I do not know how to do multiple quotes -- sorry!:o

I never thought of that! My Parents taught me to be “respectful” of Bibles, prayer books, etc., therefore, I never even place them on the floor!

Quote from Dorothy:
*When I attended a workshop for Lectors in training, we were told that we need to read the reading we are assigned to read for Sunday every day, and to meditate on it, calling on the Holy Spirit to help us.

When you arrive at Mass that day pray to the Holy Spirit for your delivery of God's Word, and also for the hearts of all in the congregation to be blessed in a special way by hearing it.*

Yes. That is the same for me. Lectors are not reading, but proclaiming The Word. We must be mindful in my congregation that some people do not know how to read! I have attended all the workshops available for those who have Ministries at Mass so that I may be better informed to serve and help.

Quote from DaveBj:
And if there are names in the readings that you don't know how to pronounce, you should have a resource (or a resource person) that you can consult so that you can pronounce them correctly without stumbling. We have a deacon who insists that the beggar at the rich man's gate was named "Lazareth," and when it comes time to read the genealogy in the 1st chapter of Matthew, I want to plug my ears.

That is not "too" bad. I was walking by a shrine's gift shop and there was a Bishop next to me. He asked me how I liked it, and I told him that I did like it, but (with sad-anger in my voice), “I would never go inside.” Surprised, he asked why. When I told him I had found “white witchcraft” :bigyikes: items inside and so had other people, he asked me to show him. He did ask me if I had done something about it. I had, but nothing was done. He then took it to the Director of the whole place (he told me he would, and thanked me for the information). All those items were removed! :tiphat: :extrahappy: I only know enough to stay away from that stuff! :thumbsup:

Is there a place, resource book, website, where the pronunciation list could be found . . . in Spanish? "I" do not want the lectors to depend on one person -- s/he could leave!

Thank you each for all your help! The only "thing" I can do to repay you is to pray for you. You have my prayers. :signofcross: :blessyou:


#10

Greetings Every One!

I pray you are well.

In my research last night (not because I do not value your outstanding input, but because I also want to do my part) at the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) website, I came across the following paragraph in the “document” The Theological Vision of Sacrosanctum Concilium and the Roman Missal

Blessing of Sacred Things
There is an increased emphasis throughout the revised Instruction on the care of all things destined for liturgical use, including everything associated with the altar (350), and liturgical books, which should be “worthy and suitable to that particular purpose.” (350) Thus the tabernacle (314), organ (313), ambo (309), presidential chair (310), vestments for priests deacons and lay ministers (335), sacred vessels (333), and all things destined for use in the liturgy should receive the requisite blessing. [All emphasis added.]

I must learn how to do quotes in this website!

I am not trying to be difficult, but it states “’should’ receive” and “requisite”. Maybe because English is my second language, that confuses me. Does this “should” here give any options? :hmmm:

Do you think this is something I may use in defense of the use of the actual Lectionary during Mass?

Thank you very much for all your help.


#11

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