My art history book is a bunch of bs!


#1

Forgive my use of lanuage there but I’m pretty ticked off.

I was flipping through my art history book and ran across the Christianity art. There’s a section that’s titled Religion and Mythology (who said Jesus was a myth? :mad: ) and it has a description of the Passion of our Lord.

It talks about the Last Supper and then it says that the disciples ate bread and it also mentions that it was A SYMBOL OF HIS BODY!!! It also mentions that this ritual became the celebration of the Mass called the Eucharist!

THAT’S NOT TRUE!!! The Eucharist is NO SYMBOL! It’s the TRUE Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of our Lord!

I think that whoever wrote this book is anti-Catholic or something! No wonder why I can’t understand the hard reading and no wonder why I hate it!


#2

they are not necessarily anti-Catholic just ignorant. They are speaking about the artistic content of the painting and explaining the elements of the painting, not giving a theology lesson. For theology get a Catholic theology book. for art history, get an art history book. As a matter of fact, most art historians are ignorant of the theological content of sacred art of the middle ages and Renaissance because they themselves have rejected the theology.


#3

[quote=puzzleannie]they are not necessarily anti-Catholic just ignorant. They are speaking about the artistic content of the painting and explaining the elements of the painting, not giving a theology lesson. For theology get a Catholic theology book. for art history, get an art history book. As a matter of fact, most art historians are ignorant of the theological content of sacred art of the middle ages and Renaissance because they themselves have rejected the theology.
[/quote]

Quite true!!! You will find this everywhere. Because they don’t understand!!! And most Protestants will go around claiming this, claiming that, which is ALL WRONG, because they are plain ignorant. It is not what THEY have learned. WE must set them straight. Good you know better!!!

We must always know every book is written from someone’s perspective–I remember reading somewhere lately that the Virgin Mary was just the new Goddess Diana and instead of "worshipping this Roman Pagan Goddess, they just transferred it to the Virgin Mary.


#4

[quote=Paris Blues]Forgive my use of lanuage there but I’m pretty ticked off.

I was flipping through my art history book and ran across the Christianity art. There’s a section that’s titled Religion and Mythology (who said Jesus was a myth? :mad: ) and it has a description of the Passion of our Lord.

It talks about the Last Supper and then it says that the disciples ate bread and it also mentions that it was A SYMBOL OF HIS BODY!!! It also mentions that this ritual became the celebration of the Mass called the Eucharist!

THAT’S NOT TRUE!!! The Eucharist is NO SYMBOL! It’s the TRUE Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of our Lord!

I think that whoever wrote this book is anti-Catholic or something! No wonder why I can’t understand the hard reading and no wonder why I hate it!
[/quote]

The Bread is both a symbol of the Lord’s body and IS what it symbolizes, just as baptism both symbolizes the removal of sin AND actually removes our sin. This could have been what the book was talking about.


#5

I sympathize greatly with the oppressive secularity of textbooks when dealing with religious subjects. I’ve had three classes, none of them astronomy, and all of them brought up Galileo for no apparent reason except to drive home the point that faith and reason are incompatible. In the case of your art history book, it is a shame that they can’t see the poetry of the soul that is the love of one’s God causing these masterpieces to be born. I mean, how can you look at Michaelangelo’s nearly breathing marble sculptures and not be moved, if only for a moment, to a higher plane? The slow killing of God in the public sphere :frowning: will be detrimental to the art world, for with no allowance for the spirit, there can be no appreciation of the beautiful.


#6

Relax; it’s just an art history book. You can’t expect correct theology from an art historian, (unless the art historian also happens to be a very knowledgeable and orthodox Catholic.)


#7

It isn’t just art books and art critics that are now clueless about the religious element in art, but also literature critics and writers of fiction that have no time for God or the supernatural (understood in the traditional sense) in the world of writing, either. Jesus’ lament: “Will there be any faith when the Son of Mas returns.” Is being fulfilled before our very eyes.


#8

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