My Church has LGBTQ Vespers?


#1

I just went to my church’s website and noticed they have LGBTQ Vespers the first of each Sunday. I can’t tell if they’re saying we should except “practicing” LGBTQ people as active Catholics who can take Communion, or if it’s about accepting the fact that these individuals have disordered tendencies and are called to celibate lifestyles (Catechism 2357-2359 clearly states we owe homosexuals respect and dignity while not condoning homosexual acts, I’m assuming this extends to anyone under the LGBTQ umbrella).
I want to contact the church to ask what the overall message of this event is, but I’m scared they’ll get angry or defensive with me.
Also saw this: https://www.lifesitenews.com/news/while-catholics-debate-communion-for-the-adulterous-remarried-some-parishes
Obviously, the Church’s official position hasn’t changed. But it seems like most Catholics either don’t know or don’t care. Seriously guys, what’s happening? I’m trying to get back into the Church and every time I do I see stuff like this that confuses me and makes me feel like we really are a hopeless sinking ship.
I wanted to talk to my priest about getting back into the church and now I’m scared to even go to him because he’s the one in charge of all this. He wrote an essay about respecting gays, and I’d like to read more so I can better understand his views, but I don’t have money to buy the essay.


#2

My advice is to leave that parish ASAP and seek out the nearest Priestly Fraternity of Saint Peter (FSSP) or Institute of Christ the King Sovereign Priest (ICRSS) parish. These are solid traditional Catholic priestly orders in full communion with Rome who are charged with parishes where you won’t have to deal with anything remotely close to “LGBTQ Vespers” (Lord, help us!) and will experience the fullness and richness of the Catholic Faith without the taint of modernism. If you don’t have any nearby, please seek counsel from the most solidly Catholic priest that you know. When it comes to your Faith, don’t mess around. Don’t even bother talking to that priest at the LGBTQ Vespers parish. He won’t give you the answers you are looking for.


#3

This is a very charitable action in keeping with the Gospel message…notice it’s Vespers not Mass…i would not want to restrict those most in need of a relationship with God from liturgical prayer?..saying the Church should not do such a thing is like the Pharisees asking Christ why he eats with sinners.


#4

How about they just have plain old vespers, then? Why does it have to be gay vespers?


#5

The vespers are not Gay…the invitation is to gays…its doubtful the parish is going to only allow those with an gay alliance I’D card attend.


#6

Perhaps they are trying to create a safe place and time for gay people to come and pray with others who are either also gay or else are not going to freak out having gay people in the same pew. It sounds like it is one event out of an entire calendar, so I’m not sure what the big concern is.


#7

If it is intended as an outreach ministry, then yes, that is quite appropriate. Prayer benefits everyone, and the gay community is in great need of spiritual growth.

If we saw a parish sign that said “Dinner for the Homeless”, that would be a good thing, in that they are in special need of food. It would be wrong to say “Why does it have to be dinner for the homeless, why not just advertise a dinner and leave it at that”. Such a comment ignores the particular need of the target community. While we all need food, they are generally in greater need.

Likewise with prayer and the gay community. While we all need prayer in our lives, they are generally in greater need.


#8

To everyone who’s saying this is a charitable act where those with LGBTQ tendencies can benefit from prayer and learn more about their role as per the Catholic Church’s teachings: if that’s what this is, I have 0 problems with it. I believe LGBTQ people deserve to be treated charitably and shared the Truth just as much as anyone else. My concern is that I don’t know if it’s that or something where they’re being told their lifestyles are acceptable in the eyes of the Church, which would completely fly in the face of the Church’s official teachings on this matter.
The problem is I don’t know how to charitably approach the matter to figure out what the situation is exactly, and I’m scared asking questions will get me in trouble. This is the only church in my town, so if I get them angry with me, I’ll be in for a hard time. And if they are offering teachings contradictory to the Church, what am I supposed to do then?


#9

Exactly…great point


#10

No, they are simply being reminded they are sinners, as we should be reminded about ourselves, even if our sins are different from theirs.


#11

Why don’t you go to Gay Vespers and see what goes on there?
It may turn out to be an hour of people who happen to be gay or have a gay family member, peacefully praying to Our Lord.
Edited to add, you’ve got me rather curious about it, I’d go myself if it was near me, just to see.


#12

Apples and oranges. We are charged as Christians to give aid the the poor. We are not called to turn a sacred hour of the Divine Office into a program of homosexual activism, especially when something like this undoubtedly serves to foster the false idea that the Church condones homosexuality. No doubt, that is precisely what this poorly masked endeavor is doing, and the OP’s confusion is evidence of its adverse affects. But no one seems to care about the confusion rampant among the rank and file faithful, as long as the gays and protestants are happy.


#13

OP, I strongly advise that you do not attend the gay vespers, especially if you are already confused about what is currently happening in the Church. Run from it. It is not of God.


#14

You’re making quick assumptions about the intent of this vespers service. There are perfectly valid reasons one might have a service targeted at this community. Before leaping to judgment, the parish office should be contacted and an inquiry made.

(And on a side note, and this makes me feel a little guilty, but I keep laughing at the term “gay vespers”.)


#15

Everyone else is making favorable assumptions, so why am I not free to make the more probable negative ones?


#16

We should begin by making the charitable assumption and correct if proven otherwise.


#17

Immediately telling the TC to give up on his parish and go to a FSSP or ICRSS parish is rash. We should also start with charitable assumptions about the intent of our clergy before assuming worst intent, though it’s always a good idea to verify.


#18

Praying Vespers in a Catholic church is “not of God”? Oooookayyy…


#19

“There’s smoke pouring in from under the door, but I won’t assume there is a fire on the other side until the flames start coming in.”


#20

Come on, now. Praying Vespers is a great thing. Turning Vespers into a venue of homosexual propaganda or something which confuses the faithful about the Church’s stance on homosexuality, is not. It’s actually diabolical because it inverses something sacred for evil ends.


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