My conclusions on Catholicism


#1

Hello,
I posted here a couple of months ago, and many of you were very helpful in answering many of my questions. I was born and raised a southern baptist. I’ve never known anything else, but recently my intrest was piqued by Catrholicism’s claims. After careful study, and prayer, buying and reading hundreds of dollars worth of books, and cd’s, there’s simply too much that I simply can’t agree with. It’s the usual list of objections- Mary, purgatory, etc. I just wanted to say thanks to all of you who answered my questions, and for the prayers.

Peace of Christ,

Matt


#2

But is there anything of your original Protestant beliefs that you can no longer hold?

(And yes, I remember you. I loved that comment you made about denting our mouses.:thumbsup: )

EDIT: Oh, and, thanks for being so gracious and kind here. CA always needs people like you.


#3

[quote=Manphibian]Hello,
I posted here a couple of months ago, and many of you were very helpful in answering many of my questions. I was born and raised a southern baptist. I’ve never known anything else, but recently my intrest was piqued by Catrholicism’s claims. After careful study, and prayer, buying and reading hundreds of dollars worth of books, and cd’s, there’s simply too much that I simply can’t agree with. It’s the usual list of objections- Mary, purgatory, etc. I just wanted to say thanks to all of you who answered my questions, and for the prayers.

Peace of Christ,

Matt
[/quote]

You’re welcome, Matt! Maybe with some reflection and prayer, you’ll come to some sort of understanding. The Catholic Church is a church that has a wonderful deepness, and fullness of worship, and we hope someday when you are ready, you can experience that too!

God Bless,
Tonks40 :thumbsup:


#4

RobNy,
Yes, I can no longer see myself only celebrating communion once evey quarter, and I do believe in the real presence.
I also learned alot about contemplative prayer and will always use it.

Tonks40,
Thanks, God Bless you as well.

So much of the Catholic Church’s teaching makes so much sense to me, I fear I can no longer remain a Baptist. Maybe i’ll try something more Liturgical, like Methodist or something.

In the end, it’s not about becoming Protestant or Catholic, it’s about becoming Gods. And on that glorious day, when I meet my Lord and my God, and share in the feast with all of my faithful heroes, the Blessed Virgin, none of this denominational stuff will even matter.

It’s all about the death of the One, for the lives of the many; and that’s more than any Pope, pastor, preacher, evangelist, apostle, disciple, priest, or anyone else could ever do justice too with human words.

Again I thank you all, and keep me in your prayers.

Be Gods,
Matt


#5

[quote=Manphibian]RobNy,
In the end, it’s not about becoming Protestant or Catholic, it’s about becoming Gods. And on that glorious day, when I meet my Lord and my God, and share in the feast with all of my faithful heroes, the Blessed Virgin, none of this denominational stuff will even matter.

It’s all about the death of the One, for the lives of the many; and that’s more than any Pope, pastor, preacher, evangelist, apostle, disciple, priest, or anyone else could ever do justice too with human words.

Again I thank you all, and keep me in your prayers.

Be Gods,
Matt
[/quote]

It’s the journey that counts!


#6

[quote=patshea1128]It’s the journey that counts!
[/quote]

I agree. Never stop looking for the Truth.


#7

Matt,

My God be with you always. Let the consuming fire of God’s love have its way in your heart forever.

Go in peace my brother in Christ…and come back once in awhile too!


#8

[quote=patshea1128]It’s the journey that counts!
[/quote]

With all due respect, it’s the destination that counts. Otherwise, why are we on the journey?

RobNy,
Yes, I can no longer see myself only celebrating communion once evey quarter, and I do believe in the real presence.
I also learned alot about contemplative prayer and will always use it.

I figured that you’d have to have the Real Presence one. Hehe. Good for you. :thumbsup:

So much of the Catholic Church’s teaching makes so much sense to me, I fear I can no longer remain a Baptist. Maybe i’ll try something more Liturgical, like Methodist or something.

Liturgy can be beautiful, but don’t mistake it for substance. I know that goes without saying, but… sometimes wise words bear repeating. I don’t think you’ll have a problem getting too caught up in that, though. Do methodists profess faith in the real presence?

The road is long and difficult, but I do sincerely hope you find rest at the end of it. Bless,
Rob


#9

Well good for you, the real presence is a great gift and something that unfortunately many people wont believe in.

Keep studying and searching for truth, there are a couple of Methodists on this board who contribute some nice insightful comments.

Have you thought about Eastern Orthodox? (this is my way of trying to lure you to be closer to Catholicism and eventually come home)

May God Bless you on your journey and may God’s will be done in your life.

Scylla


#10

Brother, if you’ve come to believe in the Real Presence—the communion with the Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of God Himself in accordance with His commandment, “Do this in memory of me” and in conformity with John 6—then you’re going to be with either us or the Orthodox eventually anyway!

Don’t wait too long, and God bless you! :tiphat:


#11

Here’s John 6:

51 I am the living bread which came down from heaven.

52 If any man eat of this bread, he shall live for ever: and the bread that I will give is my flesh, for the life of the world.

53 The Jews therefore strove among themselves, saying: How can this man give us his flesh to eat?

54 Then Jesus said to them: Amen, amen, I say unto you: except you eat the flesh of the Son of man and drink his blood, you shall not have life in you.

55 He that eateth my flesh and drinketh my blood hath everlasting life: and I will raise him up in the last day.

56 For my flesh is meat indeed: and my blood is drink indeed.

57 He that eateth my flesh and drinketh my blood abideth in me: and I in him.

58 As the living Father hath sent me and I live by the Father: so he that eateth me, the same also shall live by me.

59 This is the bread that came down from heaven. Not as your fathers did eat manna and are dead. He that eateth this bread shall live for ever.

60 These things he said, teaching in the synagogue, in Capharnaum.

61 Many therefore of his disciples, hearing it, said: This saying is hard; and who can hear it?

62 But Jesus, knowing in himself that his disciples murmured at this, said to them: Doth this scandalize you?

63 If then you shall see the Son of man ascend up where he was before?

64 It is the spirit that quickeneth: the flesh profiteth nothing. The words that I have spoken to you are spirit and life.

65 But there are some of you that believe not. For Jesus knew from the beginning who they were that did not believe and who he was that would betray him.

66 And he said: Therefore did I say to you that no man can come to me, unless it be given him by my Father.

67 After this, many of his disciples went back and walked no more with him.

68 Then Jesus said to the twelve: Will you also go away?

69 And Simon Peter answered him: Lord, to whom shall we go? Thou hast the words of eternal life.

Now you must ask yourself whether you could bear the thought of being one of the disciples who “went back and walked no more with him.” God forbid!


#12

[quote=RobNY]With all due respect, it’s the destination that counts. Otherwise, why are we on the journey?
Rob
[/quote]

The destination depends ENTIRELY on the journey! The destination is a forgone conclusion when the journey is over. I suppose it’s really a matter of what motivates you. Some enjoy the thought of the destination, others are more interested in participating in the ride along the way.


#13

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