My Confession


#1

Dear all,

Today I made my usual trip to Westminster Cathedral (the chair of the Cardinal in England) for my weekly Confession. I am a very, perhaps over scrupulous person (I did Confess this) and told the Father my list of sins and made sure to say at the end “for these sins and all my sins” (words to that affect) and he assured me that I would be forgiven for all my sins and even the sins that I had forgotten…Father gave me absolution and when I stepped out of the Confessional the feeling of grace hit me and I felt wonderful…although within a few minutes after reciting my penance I began to be reminded of things I had not mentioned during my Confession (this is a common thing for me) although I had 100% tried to Confess everything and left nothing out that came to mind during the Confession…but I feel a sense of peace due to the Priest’s words to me- I said to him I hope and pray I have made a good Confession, he said I had and told me not to worry as the absolution would be for all my sins.

I know I should not feel bad/ as if I was wrong- the Father’s advice has helped me alot, I suppose that other people who regularly go to Confession and try so hard to be good Catholics but fail more often than not also go through this, I know the Devil loves to confuse us and make us believe we are in error, especially in regards to the Sacraments.

I have begun a Novena to Our Lady Undoer of Knots, which is highly recommended by Pope Francis and is a very beautiful, special devotion…I pray she will untie my knots, keep me free of sin and in a state of grace, help me with my vocation and amongst other things also grant me peace of mind and intercede for me if there have been any defects in my Confession.

Today is the feast of the Annunciation, what a beautiful day I chose to Confess my sins!

Please pray for me!


#2

(While good feelings can be good - they are not necessary.)

A venial sin that is forgotten -does not ever need to be mentioned.

A mortal sin that was forgotten is* indirectly absolved *in that confession (one was repentant for all ones mortal sins and resolved not to commit mortal sin and tried to confess all one remembered -one just forgot one). One would just mention it in the next confession. Such is meaning mortal sin that was committed and forgotten.

After confession - instead of turning to look at ones confession -* Conversi ad Dominum *(turn towards the Lord)

(Now some with scruples can scruple about their confession -so a regular confessor is very important (for all with scruples). He might need to give them some particular direction for example tell them to only confess mortal sins from ones past that come to mind when they are both: 1. certain it was mortal and 2. certain it was not confessed as it ought (such is from age old advice for those with scruples). They may also be advised for example not to go looking for past sins. A regular confessor can guide one. Due to all sorts of scrupulous fears that can accost them.

Also as a bonus: Regarding doubtful things: While for those with a normal conscience -it is a good rule of thumb to confess such (noting they are doubtful) -for those with scruples the opposite advice is often given. They do well to remember that one is not obliged to confess doubtful mortal sins (or any venial sins for that matter).


#3

Fraz, may our Lord grant you greater peace and trust in Him.

Thanks for posting this. Scrupulosity can be a real cross, but you’ve just taken a big step towards being healed from it.


#4

This ties in with something I wonder about - - how does anyone go to Confession without writing things down? I have to, or I am afraid I will forget something. If I didn’t write everything down, I would definitely be saying the same thing “Oh I forgot this, and this, and oh, yes, that too…”:slight_smile:
I like it when the priest says “you’d better burn that paper afterwards!”


#5

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