My first Study Bible!


#1

HarperCollins Study Bible or Ignatius Catholic Study Bible: New Testament?

Lately I've been needing to get my life together. I have always struggled at reading a bible with clear understanding. So, I am looking to get a study bible.

After some research, two study bibles that stood out to me were the ESV Study Bible and the NKJ Study Bible. Now, I know those aren't catholic accepted books, and are more so for protestant and evangelist. They just stood out to me because of the content and structure of the their books. I liked that they had thousands of notes, commentaries, character profiles, glossary of terms, colored maps and pictures, etc.

So, I tried looking for a Catholic accepted study bible just like one of those, and I came across a couple that I hope are very similar structure wise to the ESV and/or KJV study bible.

The two that I found that are quite popular are the HarperCollins and Ignatius. Anyone on here have any experience with either of those? I am leaning towards HarperCollins because it is a full all-in-one, while the Ignatius one is just the NT.

A little back story, I am not a devoted catholic that one might think. I was born and raised catholic. I went through the sacraments. I attended sunday school from 1st grade to 8th grade, while going to public school, and then attended a Catholic High School. Unfortunately, I didn't take it serious. And thus, I kind of resented Catholicism and some of their practices. Especially when I got to college and a friend took me to their non denomination christian church. I loved it. I loved that it was an every day person up there sharing God's word and not a Priest, and not having to stick to strict formalities that I would have to do in a Catholic mass. I just felt more at home at those Christian masses rather than a catholic mass. But I was baptised Catholic and my whole family is catholic, but not really practicing catholics, but I feel like I owe it to them to remain catholic and not follow another Christian Denomination. And of course one day have a Catholic wedding.

But it in my belief and faith, which is the most important thing to each one of us, is that I don't see why you have to follow one precise religion and one precise denomination of that religion to become close to God, and live the way he wants me to live. I am not looking to claim myself as a Catholic, Protestant, Baptist, Evangelist, etc. I am looking to be a born again and become much MUCH closer to God. And I don't see anything saying that I can't do that with any type of Christian denomination bible. So, I would have no problem reading the ESV or KJV study bible. But of course if there is a similar or even better study bible which is more closely to Catholicism, than great.

I have a lot of figuring out to do though, and hopefully one of these study bibles can help.

Thanks in advance for the responses. It is greatly appreciated.


#2

Well,you’ve thrown in a couple issues.

You can attend those friendly Protestant services, which have superficial appeal to you. It’s hard to argue with you about that. The formality of the Catholic Mass is that Christ established a “liturgy” at the “last supper.” He took a serious, deeply religious meal and celebration, that had much meaning, in itself, and he updated it with the fulfillment of the Old Covenant (Testament) and established a New Covenant.

When you put it terms such as this, which of the two types of “services” do you feel is closer to what Christ established and intended? I should hasten to add that the ritual of the Mass is based on ancient traditions going back to the time of the apostles.

Now, certainly, there are something like 13 or more “rites” in the Catholic Church, like the Byzantine Rite, which, similarly, has a tremendously rich tradition about it, and resembles the protestant service very little, I am sure.

Protestant beliefs were based on a “reformation” which means “rejection” of the tradition of the Catholic Church, essentially. If Catholics believe or do something, it’s likely that some or many Protestant sects disagree.

The early reformers like Martin Luther and John Calvin professed a rejection of a central authority in the Church, the Pope in particular. Instead, they profess that every person has the right to interpret the Bible as he/she sees fit. Does that sound to you like the fulfillment of Christ’s promise that we shall “know” the truth, and the truth shall make us free?

It’s clear that there are thousands of denominations of Protestants in the U.S. and around the world, who characteristically assert their own interpretations of scripture. So, do you think that there ARE thousands of valid interpretations? or that there are fewer essential interpretations, under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit?

The New Testament says that “the Church” is the bulwark of truth, not the Bible alone.

Did St. Paul, in the New Testament writings, go around telling the different communities to “do their own thing” or did he not try to bring them all into line with each other? Did he not write those very letters (which were then circulated around) to get everybody “on the same page” about faith and practices?

The Catholic Church teaches so much and has written so much, that it is not easily summarized. It has tremendous depth. But, like the NT writings themselves it does not advocate the “church shopping” that protestants advise.

Don’t get me wrong. There ARE a lot of serious problems in the Church – the sex scandal and consequences of it. But, even Jesus had his Judas to contend with. Jesus said that the wheat shall grow up with the chaff, indicating that we would exist in the presence of people who are not genuine believers.

On the point of selecting a study Bible, I’d say stay with the Catholic Bible, the Ignatius study bible for starters. Technically, it’s not wrong for you to use the Protestant versions, but unless you are into deep studies, you would be best served with a Catholic Bible.


#3

I would add to my previous post, #2, that the Church even encourages us to read and study the Bible. And, in one place, it gives cautious endorsement to reading Jewish commentaries on the Bible, certainly recognizing the differences in our beliefs. But, Jewish Bible commentaries (Old Testament only) go back many centures and contain a lot of valid and insightful information.


#4

The Navarre Bible
amazon.com/Navarre-Bible-New-Testament-Expanded/dp/1594170754/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1359821335&sr=1-1&keywords=navarre+catholic+bible

And the Ignatius Catholic Study Bible are two good ones
amazon.com/gp/product/1586174851/ref=pd_lpo_k2_dp_sr_1?pf_rd_p=486539851&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=1586172506&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=1V032N73W0B1SDYG4058


#5

I appreciate your response. I have always been Catholic and have always considered myself Catholic. I am just not a strong or committed Catholic. I am more so a centrist if you will, between Catholicism and Protestant(but leaning well onto the catholic side). In my eyes, the Protestants and all other religions have that “church” that you and the NT refers to, and tells us that we should attend and worship. So all religions have that pillar or ladder to get closer to God. And no one is more right or pure than the other.

I wish the Ignatius study bible was similar in structure and content than the other “non catholic” bibles.

I found a couple other study bibles a bit ago on the net that seem interesting as well. And they are Chronological Life Application Study Bible NLT, and Life Application Study Bible (the original, non chronological order version). According to the barnes and noble website, they are on the shelves at the B&N by my house. so I am going to check them out. I want to hurry up and get to studying but after all this research, people across various forums are making it sound like it is a mortal sin if I accidentally get my hands on the wrong denomination christian bible.


#6

I have the NIV study Bible ($65 twenty years ago) and I have the KJV and the Jewish Tanakh on my self. I have the Jewish Study Bible (Oxford Press) and a series of commentaries by the Jewish Publication Society.

Sure, the NIV is a great study bible, with cross references, the occasional drawing, lots of maps, lots of footnotes and commentaries -- but, make no mistake -- IT'S NOT CATHOLIC

You don't have to be convinced if you don't want to be, about there being one true church of Jesus Christ. But how do you deal with the explicit and contradictory differences between them?

Jesus said the true path to salvation is narrow, the road to destruction wide.

A lot of Protestants are staunchly defensive of their "Bible alone" idea, and use Rev 22:18 to defend it -- not to add or take away from "this book" which they generalize to the entire Bible. So, they put you on the hook with this verse. They think that if you're a Catholic, then your trapped by scripture.

But, hold on. In 1 Thess 2:15 Paul says to "hold on" to what they have been taught by verbal teaching or epistle. This verse does not support a "Bible alone" orientation. And, by Rev 22:18, they shouldn't ignore 1 Thess 2:15, but they do so anyway. Go figure.


#7

[quote="sirach2v4, post:6, topic:317550"]
I have the NIV study Bible ($65 twenty years ago) and I have the KJV and the Jewish Tanakh on my self. I have the Jewish Study Bible (Oxford Press) and a series of commentaries by the Jewish Publication Society.

Sure, the NIV is a great study bible, with cross references, the occasional drawing, lots of maps, lots of footnotes and commentaries -- but, make no mistake -- IT'S NOT CATHOLIC

[/quote]

What about it that doesn't make it catholic aside from it having 66 books rather than the 73 which catholic bibles have? If you are referring to the disbelief in purgatory or the belief in doctrine of sola scriptura, then I am fine with that. I don't have a stance in that right now since I don't have the foundation to give my religiously education opinion/belief. I am leaning toward Protestant in terms some of the Catholic vs. Protestant differences though. I don't believe the Bible and Catholic Church are on the same level. But I am not against the Catholic Church. I don't believe that the Bible is completely sufficient by itself. You still need to do more than just read the book, but regardless of your religion or denomination, we all that that Church and tradition to go to and worship. I don't really believe in praying to Mary or the Saints. Again, not against it. I just believe God/Jesus should be the only being that you pray to.

Im not the type to tell another person what to believe in or how to praise God. We all take different roads(religions and denominations of religions) to get to the same place. Not one road is better or more correct than the other.


#8

[quote="sirach2v4, post:6, topic:317550"]
I have the NIV study Bible ($65 twenty years ago) and I have the KJV and the Jewish Tanakh on my self. I have the Jewish Study Bible (Oxford Press) and a series of commentaries by the Jewish Publication Society.

Sure, the NIV is a great study bible, with cross references, the occasional drawing, lots of maps, lots of footnotes and commentaries -- but, make no mistake -- IT'S NOT CATHOLIC

You don't have to be convinced if you don't want to be, about there being one true church of Jesus Christ. But how do you deal with the explicit and contradictory differences between them?

Jesus said the true path to salvation is narrow, the road to destruction wide.

A lot of Protestants are staunchly defensive of their "Bible alone" idea, and use Rev 22:18 to defend it -- not to add or take away from "this book" which they generalize to the entire Bible. So, they put you on the hook with this verse. They think that if you're a Catholic, then your trapped by scripture.

But, hold on. In 1 Thess 2:15 Paul says to "hold on" to what they have been taught by verbal teaching or epistle. This verse does not support a "Bible alone" orientation. And, by Rev 22:18, they shouldn't ignore 1 Thess 2:15, but they do so anyway. Go figure.

[/quote]

Thanks for the responses.

Like I said, I was born and raised Catholic. Just didn't take it serious. It is time that I do and hopefully I become stronger after completing a study bible.


#9

[quote="NewBeginning, post:8, topic:317550"]
Thanks for the responses.

Like I said, I was born and raised Catholic. Just didn't take it serious. It is time that I do and hopefully I become stronger after completing a study bible.

[/quote]

Douay-Rheims Bible with the Haydock Commentary.

This is the online version:

haydock1859.tripod.com/


#10

[quote="NewBeginning, post:1, topic:317550"]

And of course one day have a Catholic wedding.

[/quote]

PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE Don't get married in the Catholic Church if you don"t believe everything the Catholic Church says about Mariage!!! PLEASE don't partake of ANY of the sacraments if you do not believe what the Catholic Church claims about them is true. You will be commiting a very grievous error!!


#11

[quote="babs57, post:10, topic:317550"]
PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE Don't get married in the Catholic Church if you don"t believe everything the Catholic Church says about Mariage!!! PLEASE don't partake of ANY of the sacraments if you do not believe what the Catholic Church claims about them is true. You will be commiting a very grievous error!!

[/quote]

I am not going to be getting married anytime soon. At the rate things are going, I still probably got another decade til I get married lol. So, my beliefs and plans will be different by then.But aside from that, you aren't in a position to tell another person what they should or shouldn't do based on what your believe their religious standpoint is. Plus, God still looks at us the same whether you get married in a catholic ceremony, jewish ceremony or any other type of religious or non religious ceremony. No one is more correct or truer than the other lol. So you should probably refrain from making comments like that. But thanks for your comments. I come from a family that takes marriage really serious. No one in my family or even distant family has gotten a divorce, and most if not all of them got married in a Catholic ceremony.


#12

[quote="NewBeginning, post:11, topic:317550"]
I am not going to be getting married anytime soon. At the rate things are going, I still probably got another decade til I get married lol. So, my beliefs and plans will be different by then.But aside from that, you aren't in a position to tell another person what they should or shouldn't do based on what your believe their religious standpoint is. Plus, God still looks at us the same whether you get married in a catholic ceremony, jewish ceremony or any other type of religious or non religious ceremony. No one is more correct or truer than the other lol. So you should probably refrain from making comments like that. But thanks for your comments. I come from a family that takes marriage really serious. No one in my family or even distant family has gotten a divorce, and most if not all of them got married in a Catholic ceremony.

[/quote]

I say it because in the Catholic Church, it IS different than any other religious tradition. It is one of the Sacraments. It's more than just a promise. It is a sacred, covenantal VOW. If you break the vow, you break the commandment of not swearing false oaths. It is a danger to you spiritually. All other Christian faith traditions allow divorce. The Catholic Church does not. I know you say that you take marriage seriously. I just think you rattitude toward the Sacraments is a bit cavalier.


#13

[quote="babs57, post:12, topic:317550"]
I say it because in the Catholic Church, it IS different than any other religious tradition. It is one of the Sacraments. It's more than just a promise. It is a sacred, covenantal VOW. If you break the vow, you break the commandment of not swearing false oaths. It is a danger to you spiritually. All other Christian faith traditions allow divorce. The Catholic Church does not. I know you say that you take marriage seriously. I just think you rattitude toward the Sacraments is a bit cavalier.

[/quote]

NewBeginning,

I am happy to see your excitement and am glad to see your interest in getting a study Bible. I would recommend you get both! I am sure you can get both at Amazon.com for pretty cheap, particularly if you are willing to get a lightly used copy. The HarperCollins is a very good resources, which will be more academic than the Ignatius edition. However the Ignatius Study Bible will be more specifically Catholic and will fill in the gaps that are not found in the HarperCollins edition. If you are looking for reviews and commentary you are welcome to check out my blog catholicbibles.blogspot.com. Feel free to send along an email if you have any questions. (It is located on the side bar on my site)

God bless you on your journey.


#14

Here is a very good online Catholic Bible study........

agapebiblestudy.com/


#15

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