My first Tridentine Latin Mass (Tridentine Latin - Missa Cantata)

[quote=Dropper]Even if he was, he was facing Liturgical East. Toward our Savior.
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ahhh, is that what he meant? the “liturgical East”?

[quote=Superstar905]ahhh, is that what he meant? the “liturgical East”?
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Well, sometimes it’s actual east. These days it may not be possible to position a church so that the front is toward the east…

catholiceducation.org/articles/religion/re0540.html

I don’t say Mass “with my back to the people” anymore than Patton went through Germany with his “back to the soldiers.” Patton led the Third Army across Germany and they followed him to achieve a goal. The Mass is part of the Pilgrim Church on the way to our goal, our heavenly homeland. This world is not our heavenly homeland. We don’t sit around in a circle and look at each other. We want to look *with *each other and with the priest towards the rising sun, the rays of grace, where the Son will come again in glory on the clouds.

Sun rises in the East, a symbol of the Resurrection of Christ.

I kinda liked your “top secret” comment :p. You were at a low mass. Kind of the equivalent to today’s 30 minute mass, the one where everything is spoken, either a short homily or none. These are the masses that many people I know seek out because they get you in and out in 30 minutes or less…

[quote=Iohannes]For the last time, the priest is not facing “back of the people”. :rolleyes: It is called ad orientem. He is facing east. It is the sacrificial position. God the Son is being offered to God the Father. That is why the priest faces that way. He is offering the Son to the Father.

It is not “back to the people”. It is called Ad Orientem. Drill it in your head.
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Now what would a Church like the Basilica of the Sacred Heart do since the Church faces North?

[quote=ND Mike]Now what would a Church like the Basilica of the Sacred Heart do since the Church faces North?
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Again, Liturgical East…

It’s not necessarily literally East…

[quote=mgy100]I kinda liked your “top secret” comment :p. You were at a low mass. Kind of the equivalent to today’s 30 minute mass, the one where everything is spoken, either a short homily or none. These are the masses that many people I know seek out because they get you in and out in 30 minutes or less…
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At Low Mass said during the week usually the faithful are all praying using their missals. You are not onlookers, you are offering the Mass along with the priest. Low Mass takes about 30 minutes to 60 minutes if a homily is added. Our sermons are always at least 30 minutes.

Melanie, I was talking about current mass… I could rattle off a list of people I know that like the fastest mass in town. Yes, in the old days I have heard stories of a priest (of blessed memory) that would say low mass on weekdays in under 10 minutes.
The current mass can be said in record times as well… no singing, no homily, it can be done fast.
Actually many elders in real life, not internet life, have told me that in the old days people prayed their own devotions, ie, rosary, during mass.

[quote=mgy100]Melanie, I was talking about current mass… I could rattle off a list of people I know that like the fastest mass in town. Yes, in the old days I have heard stories of a priest (of blessed memory) that would say low mass on weekdays in under 10 minutes.
The current mass can be said in record times as well… no singing, no homily, it can be done fast.
Actually many elders in real life, not internet life, have told me that in the old days people prayed their own devotions, ie, rosary, during mass.
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I have seen folk pray the rosary during Mass. I feel that this is rather offensive as the Mass is the Ultimate Prayer, however I would not dream of suggesting this to the person involved as they would be very upset to think it an offense. We say the rosary prior to the beginning of first Mass on Sunday.

[quote=Superstar905]Thanks for your insights. I have not found a High Mass yet in Toronto. I just want to be clear, that in no way do I consider the current normative form of the mass (I’m guessing called the Novus Ordo) to be any less valid, just different. One thing I must say though, is that from what I’ve read, the Tridentine Mass is not the same mass practiced in the times of the Apostles. It has developed throughout the early Church: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tridentine_Mass

Thanks again, I certainly will revisit this mass, as i do feel somewhat drawn to it. I need to understand what is happening and what is being said though, so I will have to learn the latin parts.
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I should clarify what I wrote. I meant that it is the organic evolution (for lack of a better word) of the mass, from the time of the apostles to the present. It certainly is not the way it was celebrated by the apostles!!! Sorry I wasn’t clearer.

And God will bless you for your efforts, I’m sure! Does the chapel you attend provide any sort of english/latin missal? Those are invaluble for the beginning Latin Mass goer, as you can read along with the priest, and so feel more a part of the Sacrifice. In fact, reading and praying the Mass prayers along with the priest is very much encouraged, I believe. Once you read the prayers in english and know exactly what is being said, I’m sure your appreciation for the TLM will develop immensely, as it seems you have a very welcoming disposition towards it. It actually takes much less time than you would think to become very familiar with the Latin.

If you find a High Mass to attend, I pray the choir is reasonably good at Chant. Gregorian Chant is incredibly uplifting and can add immensely to the reverence of the Mass; however, I stand with Pope St. Pius X in saying that if the choir isn’t reasonably well-educated in Chant, the music is more distracting than helpful! Although, I’m sure God always blesses the efforts of those who are singing. :stuck_out_tongue:

Again, may God bless you in your efforts!

The Asperges is a purification rite done by the priest before a High Mass on Sunday. I miss that tremendously even at a sung NO Latin Mass.
I didn’t like the Old Mass either. But after 6 weeks of attending Sunday and daily Masses in the Old rite, it sank in. And I was born into an anti-catholic, fundamentalist family in the South, and had no nostalgia whatsoever. In fact, as a Protestant, I had the same prejudices against the"medieval" Church and its rituals that the mordernist dissenters have.
I would describe it as liberating, as being free to fly to God. There is time to pray. There is no rushing
Just study why certain things are done. Whyare the readings and Gospel in Latin? Latin is for God’s glory, not our edification or education.
I would compare the Old High Mass with eating a several course dinner in an elegant French restaurant and the regular, vernacular Mass to eating at McDonald’s.

[quote=Leeta]The Asperges is a purification rite done by the priest before a High Mass on Sunday. I miss that tremendously even at a sung NO Latin Mass.
I didn’t like the Old Mass either. But after 6 weeks of attending Sunday and daily Masses in the Old rite, it sank in. And I was born into an anti-catholic, fundamentalist family in the South, and had no nostalgia whatsoever. In fact, as a Protestant, I had the same prejudices against the"medieval" Church and its rituals that the mordernist dissenters have.
I would describe it as liberating, as being free to fly to God. There is time to pray. There is no rushing
Just study why certain things are done. Whyare the readings and Gospel in Latin? Latin is for God’s glory, not our edification or education.
I would compare the Old High Mass with eating a several course dinner in an elegant French restaurant and the regular, vernacular Mass to eating at McDonald’s.
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Ooohhhhhh put on the flame suit, Leeta! While I find that analogy to be an accurate way of describing the general experiential difference between the TLM vs. the NO, there are others here who have reacted angrily to that analogy in the past (“JESUS IS NOT A CHEESEBURGER!!!”). (Sean OL or ByzCath will be along shortly…)

Silly digression of the day:

I loved the actual East vs. “liturgical East” point clarified earlier in the thread. Just imagine what would happen when we finally build a church on the North (move over Santa!) and South Poles-- without “liturgical East” you’d have quite a problem!!!

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