My last post...psy/spiritual Part 2


#1

You know, I was cleaning up the kitchen

and musing on the thread I started on the

psychological/spiritual in the Apologetics

forum. I’ve been trying to put my finger on

what it is that bothers me

about the attitudes on faith/psychology that

I occassionaly run across.

Then…bingo!..it came to me out of the blue.

Prescinding from neurobiological/brain structure

etiolgies of MI, and considering those MI that

are caused by early psychological injury to

the child, who has no mature defenses or critical skills,

some people seem to have it entirely backwards.

These suffering people have been sinned against,

and are reeling from injury, yet they are abjured

to “confess their sins”, “get right with God”,

when it is God who weeps *for *them.

To me, it’s a form of re-victimization, whether

it is intended or no.

Hallejuah!!

Now, I don’t *care *who understands what I’m saying.

I understand it, and refuse to allow myself to be

re-victimized. To allow *anyone *to define my

experience of mental illness, in terms of religious

practice or in any other way.

Thanks to all who have responded to my 250+

posts. You’ve helped me to recognize what

has bothered me for years and to articulate

same.

To those who have been abused physically or

emotionally, to those who were literally

abandoned, or abandoned psychologically

as children, to those who had adults around

them conveying the faith but who failed to see the

dazed expression on those being tutored -children

who were trying to “find a place” in a world that had

no place for them…pray with me, will you?

"Father, forgive them, for they knew not what

they were doing or failed to do."

Thanks again to all who helped me on this

journey.

Maureen [reen12]


#2

I would have to agree with what I believe I understand of your post. Those who have been mentally injured have no need to confess regarding what was done to them in order to “get right with God.” It is the purpetrators of the injuries who need to confess.

One only need to confess their own actual sins. Not the sins of others or the effects that the others sins have had on them.


#3

hey Maureen…why are you leaving.?..when one discovers truths…one should remain to receive more light…dont you think so?

peace :slight_smile:


#4

reen12–we’re praying for you.


#5

Hello reen,

I trust that your minor sabbatical was well worth it.

Remember to never take to heart what others post here. Always take it with a grain of salt. I have found over the years that many people are not only ignorant of most, if not all, of the facts of everything.

For example, I can not give you a detailed reason on why tertiary color schemes are better than contrasting color schemes - despite an associates in art history. I would need to defer to a professional, or at least a more experienced individual, in such an area. So, as you can see, in this area I am ignorant of the facts.

The same can be said for posters here. While most all are good people with good intentions, they may not be in possession of the facts as needed to merit out competent advice.

I think that most people are trying their best to help. However, they get caught up in a spiritual battle only ideology. I can honestly say that I think a well grounded, rounded spirituality is an essential element to recovery. However, so is practical medical/psychological help. I wouldn’t want anyone to confuse the “get spiritual help” people with the Puritanical.

The Puritanical are, however, an all together different matter. These are the people who feel that all things in life are solely the domain of the spiritual. This is not only delusional, but very, very dangerous.

The optometrist on your first thread is absolutely right. God is the source of all things, so at its most basic element there is a spiritual element. To that you, most others and I agree. However, never believe anyone who tells you there is no medical, or psychological, reason for mental illness.

I love this one we all see from time to time on mass emails:

A man was sitting on his roof during a flood crying aloud to God to save him. A boat comes by and offers to take him out. He says no thanks as he is relying on God.

An hour later the water is even higher and the man cries aloud to God for help again. Again a boat comes by and offers help, but again the man refuses saying he is relying on God.

Another hour passes and the water is almost at the crest of the roof. The man cries aloud with much fear for God’s help. Then a loud voice comes down from heaven and says, “what more do you want? I already sent you two boats to bring you safely out of the flood”

Indeed the man on the roof is the person(s) who refuses the very real and practical world for the spiritual one only. Do not let those folks get to you. Remember that they simply do not know what they are talking about. A very real part of God’s creation is the material world and we are its stewards. So, use it and those trained in its use to better yourself. Of course always do so with a prayer. And always lift up your suffering to God for your own sanctification, for those who suffer like you, for the poor souls of purgatory, for those who have left, or do not know, the church, and for those who persecute you because of your situation.

Until we meet again I am your unworthy brother in Christ.


#6

reen, as always well put. :clapping: I think you should consider writting a book on the matter.
In my prayers God loves you!


#7

I will pray for you!

smileys.smileycentral.com/cat/36/36_1_41.gif


#8

Thanks to all who have posted. To me, it is

an act of charity on your part.

Hey, Mike, I think I’ll title the book: To Hell and Back:
Memories of a Wounded Wretch

My grandmother used to say: Keep your sense of
humor, Reen, it’ll see you through anything.

Gram, you were right, too.

Maureen [reen12]


#9

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