My observations at Mass today!


#1

The pastor greets people, while dressed in a cassock, while the Church bells ring.
Priest (the associate) presides in rose coloured vestments.
Priest sings the parts of the mass including the whole Eucharistic prayer.
Priest gives a good and clear homily.
Choir sings a Capella the parts of the mass in Latin (and the Kyrie in Greek ;))
Congregation know and sing all the parts of the mass in Latin (and Greek;))
There is organ accompaniment to the communion hymn.
There are 3 EMHCs
There are bells for the appropriate time.
People reverently line up and bow before receiving communion.
Both priests are under 40.

This is a regular diocesan parish, with the mass in English.

Just thought I'd share.:)


#2

Thanks Triumph Guy. I did not know you were a fellow parishioner!


#3

[quote="triumphguy, post:1, topic:317961"]
Priest sings the parts of the mass including the whole Eucharistic prayer.

[/quote]

I'm all for singing the Mass, but I am curious: where did the concept of singing the EP come from? It just seems kind of strange to me....


#4

[quote="IesumPerMariam, post:3, topic:317961"]
I'm all for singing the Mass, but I am curious: where did the concept of singing the EP come from? It just seems kind of strange to me....

[/quote]

The entire Mass is meant to be chanted, including the Gospel.

That sounded so wonderful that I'm tempted to use my Aeroplan points just to fly to Calgary to attend Palm Sunday Mass at triumphguy's parish!


#5

[quote="triumphguy, post:1, topic:317961"]
The pastor greets people, while dressed in a cassock, while the Church bells ring.
Priest (the associate) presides in rose coloured vestments.
Priest sings the parts of the mass including the whole Eucharistic prayer.
Priest gives a good and clear homily.
Choir sings a Capella the parts of the mass in Latin (and the Kyrie in Greek ;))
Congregation know and sing all the parts of the mass in Latin (and Greek;))
There is organ accompaniment to the communion hymn.
There are 3 EMHCs
There are bells for the appropriate time.
People reverently line up and bow before receiving communion.
Both priests are under 40.
...]
Just thought I'd share.:)

[/quote]

:thumbsup: Same here except for the 3 EMHCs, but that's largely because I made the trip to the EF mass at Sacred Heart in Lacombe, LA.


#6

[quote="triumphguy, post:1, topic:317961"]
The pastor greets people, while dressed in a cassock, while the Church bells ring.
Priest (the associate) presides in rose coloured vestments.
Priest sings the parts of the mass including the whole Eucharistic prayer.
Priest gives a good and clear homily.
Choir sings a Capella the parts of the mass in Latin (and the Kyrie in Greek ;))
Congregation know and sing all the parts of the mass in Latin (and Greek;))
There is organ accompaniment to the communion hymn.
There are 3 EMHCs
There are bells for the appropriate time.
People reverently line up and bow before receiving communion.
Both priests are under 40.

This is a regular diocesan parish, with the mass in English.

Just thought I'd share.:)

[/quote]

Sounds like someone has been listening to our dear retired Holy Father. Linus2nd


#7

[quote="triumphguy, post:1, topic:317961"]
The pastor greets people, while dressed in a cassock, while the Church bells ring.
Priest (the associate) presides in rose coloured vestments.
Priest sings the parts of the mass including the whole Eucharistic prayer.
Priest gives a good and clear homily.
Choir sings a Capella the parts of the mass in Latin (and the Kyrie in Greek ;))
Congregation know and sing all the parts of the mass in Latin (and Greek;))
There is organ accompaniment to the communion hymn.
There are 3 EMHCs
There are bells for the appropriate time.
People reverently line up and bow before receiving communion.
Both priests are under 40.

This is a regular diocesan parish, with the mass in English.

Just thought I'd share.:)

[/quote]

Sign me up! :p


#8

Our priest almost always does. It’s actually more of a chanting than singing. I think this is really comon.


#9

[quote="Phemie, post:4, topic:317961"]
The entire Mass is meant to be chanted, including the Gospel.

That sounded so wonderful that I'm tempted to use my Aeroplan points just to fly to Calgary to attend Palm Sunday Mass at triumphguy's parish!

[/quote]

I agree it sounds like a beautiful Mass, your priest seem very devoted to the Mass.


#10

[quote="Allegra, post:8, topic:317961"]
Our priest almost always does. It's actually more of a chanting than singing. I think this is really common.

[/quote]

Our priests almost always chant it, too, even at daily Mass. It's wonderful :)


#11

[quote="Allegra, post:8, topic:317961"]
Our priest almost always does. It's actually more of a chanting than singing. I think this is really comon.

[/quote]

Well, I figured it would be Roman chant, but I've never seen it done, and never heard of it until recently. I've seen everything sung except the Munda cor meum before the Gospel, the Lava me, Domine at the washing of the hands, and the EP/Canon. It seems like it would be distracting, IMO.


#12

What a lovely Mass! You are so blessed. We are very rural so we takes what we can gets, if you know what I mean.

A little history on the chanting/sing-song reading of the liturgy. Unlike most Protestant denominations, the Catholic Church has stayed more true to its Jewish roots. The first Masses were conducted by mostly Jews, of course. And if you go to a synagog, even today, you will hear the readings from the Torah read in a chant rather natural voice. The Catholic Mass is much more familiar to Jews than to Protestants!

I believe one of the reasons for this is to convey the dignity and authority of the words - that the reader is NOT stating them by their own authority or as their own version (voice) of things, but that you are in stead conveying the Word of God. This is not as well conveyed when one tries to read the liturgy in a natural, conversational dramatic tone.

I wish more priests and lectors would stick to this ancient formula. It is nice if one can sing, but not all priests are so blessed. However, anyone can learn to chant.


#13

I forgot to mention that the ancient and modern Jews also sing many of their prayers, and the psalms were all sung. When we pray in song, we are using a very ancient method of prayer and we know it is pleasing to God from the Old Testament.


#14

I think the question of the chanted EP rests on the fact that a chanted EP wasn't part of the Roman Rite until recently. Prior to that, for a very long time, the EP was in a low voice and, naturally, there was no point to sing it.


#15

[quote="YoungTradCath, post:14, topic:317961"]
I think the question of the chanted EP rests on the fact that a chanted EP wasn't part of the Roman Rite until recently. Prior to that, for a very long time, the EP was in a low voice and, naturally, there was no point to sing it.

[/quote]

Yes, that's what I was getting at. I'm curious what the origin specifically of the chanted EP is. Is it just a natural synthesis of the facts that the EP is no longer required to be silent and that the Mass has always been, by natural preference, a chanted liturgy?

When this is done, are even the Words of Institution chanted?


#16

The Mass that I was grateful and privileged to attend today was also awesome! How lucky we are to have dedicated Priests (today a Capuchin Brother/Father) and laity to ensure this! :slight_smile:


#17

Yes.


#18

When I was in High School in the late 70's, we had monthly Mass. We had a main celebrant and usually 2 concelebrating priests who would chant the EP together. It was inspiring.


#19

I went to a neighboring parish yesterday and found that the tabernacle was smack dab front and center behind the altar. Last time I was there (over a year ago), it was in a separate chapel.

Thought I would share that with all of you.


#20

Which parish? Might it be St. Bonaventure or St. Albert the Great, by any chance?


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