My school "asking" kids to sign ADL pledge


#1

The large high school I teach at is planning on having the students sign the Anti-defamation League’s “No Place for Hate” pledge, which is a promise to take no part in, and to act against, forms of prejudicial hatred. The pledge as worded is not explicitly objectionable (I’ve pasted it below). It is a rewording of a previous ADL pledge which included views disagreeing with homosexuality as “hatred” (naturally terming this “homophobia”). Homosexual rights has long been part of their mission.

Long story short: I wrote to the principal that to have the kids sign ANY sort of oath “gives me the creeps.” I said that the ADL’s well-established view of what they consider “hatred” makes this the kind of thing that should be presented to parents first. It’s “parents’ territory.”

Few colleagues see any issue here, understandably. The utter lack of affirmation by anyone I’ve talked to makes me question my position more than I otherwise would.

Perspectives and comments, please? (Thank God for this forum).

[FONT=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Resolution of Respect
I pledge from this day forward to do my best to combat prejudice and to stop those who, because of hate or ignorance, would hurt anyone or violate their civil rights. I will try at all times to be aware of my own biases and seek to gain understanding of those who I perceive as being different from myself. I will speak out against all forms of prejudice and discrimination. I will reach out to support those who are targets of hate. I will think about specific ways my community members can promote respect for people and create a prejudice-free zone. I firmly believe that one person can make a difference and that no person can be an “innocent” bystander when it comes to opposing hate. I recognize that respecting individual dignity, achieving equality and promoting intergroup harmony are the responsibilities of all people. By signing this pledge, I commit myself to creating a community that is No Place for HateTM.
[/FONT]


#2

Nope. I wouldn't have anything to do with it, and I agree parents should be informed. This is not something the school should be engaging in. Social engineering is the goal of progressives. It is nowhere more demonstrated than in public schools. You are spot on.


#3

I think you have the right, as a parent, to let the school know your children are not going to sign anything.

It's disgusting that the school would even think this way.

On a personal note-I generally like and agree with the ADL, but I hate when anyone pushes people around and makes them do things they don't want too.


#4

Thanks for the input so far. Keep in mind that the school and most of the faculty, from their perspective, see no futher than the wording of the pledge. Further, it's human nature to want to assume the best intent of people until proven otherwise (thus, the ADL's goal is seen to be no more than reducing hatred). Lastly, there is a powerful aversion to objecting to something like this, since it so clearly exposes one to the charge of being in favor of hate! (This was the unanimous consensus regarding a school called Wheatley, out west somewhere, which refused to go along with this.)

I see no chance the administration can turn around on this, and not be crucified.

Peace.
John


#5

I agree that the parents should be let in on this however I don't have issues with the idea.

I would sign the pledge just because it's not right to be harassed or bullied regardless of color,origin,religion,or sexuality.

If it's an optional thing then I think it's o.k.:thumbsup:


#6

[quote="Bishop93, post:5, topic:190484"]
I agree that the parents should be let in on this however I don't have issues with the idea.

I would sign the pledge just because it's not right to be harassed or bullied regardless of color,origin,religion,or sexuality.

If it's an optional thing then I think it's o.k.:thumbsup:

[/quote]

Yes. Of course, giving this to an entire class, presenting it as good, then having kids agree or not, creates a pressure that makes this not truly "optional."

And parents should be more than let in on this; they should be given the opportunity to object and make their case, because...

 ...the intent of the pledge, considering the source and the very nature of indoctrination, may well be far more than preventing harrassment and bullying; it may be to cause kids to have a particular opinion and act a particular way about things that the ADL calls "hate" but those kids' parents do not:  opposition to (so-called) homosexual marriage and to the affirmation of same-sex relationships between students.

Ironic, too, that the very proposal to implement this pledge feels like bullying to those who disagree.

Peace.
John


#7

I think a potential pitfall here is the fact that "prejudice" and "discrimination" are very subjective. At what point does one persons' expressed opinion become discriminatory and hateful?


#8

[quote="MedStudent, post:7, topic:190484"]
I think a potential pitfall here is the fact that "prejudice" and "discrimination" are very subjective. At what point does one persons' expressed opinion become discriminatory and hateful?

[/quote]

The point is how you deliver it, I think. Do you say, "I hate you because your X". Or do you say, "Golly, X might not be the best way to live your life...I love you as a brother/sister in Christ and don't want to see you hurt yourself in the long rin..."

Never forget that there IS bigotry, discrimination, and prejudice in this world. No matter who it is geared towards, it's sickening to all decent people. The ADL might be off on this or that issue, but I still admire them, for the most part.

Just my thoughts...


#9

Excellent point. Already there are instances of those who preach the Gospel in Canada being persecuted for “hate speech.”

.


#10

To me, this is just another example of the education system trying usurp the parental role. Let the school know they have overstepped their role as EDUCATORS.

This pledge is just the low level heat, that will be turned up to boil the frog. We all know violence against others is simply wrong, but they are trying to twist this logic. PPs have stated it well in regards to prejudice being very subjective.


#11

The ADL Pledge reads well, and I personally have no difficulty with it. However, I do have doubts about the AD and probably would not sign it because of these doubts..

The pledge seems to make an exception for Israel, which it so strongly supports regardless of Israeli policies. Among other things, Israel continuously demonstrates prejudice against Palestianians, violates the rights of Palestinians, both Christians and Muslims, by seizing their land, destroying their orchards, etc.  Israel doesn't practice separation of religion and state, with all sorts of preference given Judaism, such as very stringent Sabbath laws closing downs buses, television, and such. Israel doesn't allow Jews to marry non-Jews, so such couples have to go elsewhere to marry. Israel only permits Jews to come and settle in Israel, without even allowing Palestinians who own property in Israel to return and claim it. Israel does not permit Christian evangelism, and messianic Jews have faced enormous discrimination. And we could go on.

  And, by the way, as Israel keeps grabbing more and more Palestinian territory to expand its own borders, Al Qaeda uses this as effective propaganda to recruit more and more terrorists to target the USA. In brief, Israel is a major cause of terrorism directed at us. Look at what happened earlier this week, when Israel announced 1600 new Jewish homes on Palestianian territory just as Biden arrived to promote peace talks. What sort of ally, which receives billions from US taxpayers each year, would be so defiant? I think it's called Chutzpah - maybe spelled differently? The USA and the Middle East will not enjoy peace until America frees itself from serving as a puppet of Israel. Tragically, our politicians, Democrats and Republicans, are afraid of the powerful and well-financed and vindictive Israeli Lobby which is avidly supported by Zionist evangelicals.

  Let us pray for the peace of Jerusalem, that Jews, Christians and Muslims might dwell there in harmony.

  Fortunately, more and more lovers of Israel (and I am one of them) are coming to realize that Israel's security will only be guaranteed when the long-suffering Palestinians have justice. This also will help defeat terrorism, whether in the Holy Land or in the larger world. Israel could be a light unto the nations if it follows policies that make for peace and not aimed at continual expansion.

#12

[quote="Roy5, post:11, topic:190484"]
The ADL Pledge reads well, and I personally have no difficulty with it. However, I do have doubts about the AD and probably would not sign it because of these doubts..

The pledge seems to make an exception for Israel, which it so strongly supports regardless of Israeli policies. Among other things, Israel continuously demonstrates prejudice against Palestianians, violates the rights of Palestinians, both Christians and Muslims, by seizing their land, destroying their orchards, etc.  Israel doesn't practice separation of religion and state, with all sorts of preference given Judaism, such as very stringent Sabbath laws closing downs buses, television, and such. Israel doesn't allow Jews to marry non-Jews, so such couples have to go elsewhere to marry. Israel only permits Jews to come and settle in Israel, without even allowing Palestinians who own property in Israel to return and claim it. Israel does not permit Christian evangelism, and messianic Jews have faced enormous discrimination. And we could go on.

  And, by the way, as Israel keeps grabbing more and more Palestinian territory to expand its own borders, Al Qaeda uses this as effective propaganda to recruit more and more terrorists to target the USA. In brief, Israel is a major cause of terrorism directed at us. Look at what happened earlier this week, when Israel announced 1600 new Jewish homes on Palestianian territory just as Biden arrived to promote peace talks. What sort of ally, which receives billions from US taxpayers each year, would be so defiant? I think it's called Chutzpah - maybe spelled differently? The USA and the Middle East will not enjoy peace until America frees itself from serving as a puppet of Israel. Tragically, our politicians, Democrats and Republicans, are afraid of the powerful and well-financed and vindictive Israeli Lobby which is avidly supported by Zionist evangelicals.

  Let us pray for the peace of Jerusalem, that Jews, Christians and Muslims might dwell there in harmony.

  Fortunately, more and more lovers of Israel (and I am one of them) are coming to realize that Israel's security will only be guaranteed when the long-suffering Palestinians have justice. This also will help defeat terrorism, whether in the Holy Land or in the larger world. Israel could be a light unto the nations if it follows policies that make for peace and not aimed at continual expansion.

[/quote]

Could you point out where the pledge makes an exception for Israel because I'm not seeing it.

As far as the op goes, the pledge is innocent enough but I think it's best left up to the parents. Teaching right from wrong is the parents responsibility not the schools.


#13

[quote="john_ennis, post:1, topic:190484"]
The large high school I teach at is planning on having the students sign the Anti-defamation League's "No Place for Hate" pledge, which is a promise to take no part in, and to act against, forms of prejudicial hatred. The pledge as worded is not explicitly objectionable (I've pasted it below). It is a rewording of a previous ADL pledge which included views disagreeing with homosexuality as "hatred" (naturally terming this "homophobia"). Homosexual rights has long been part of their mission.

Long story short: I wrote to the principal that to have the kids sign ANY sort of oath "gives me the creeps." I said that the ADL's well-established view of what they consider "hatred" makes this the kind of thing that should be presented to parents first. It's "parents' territory."

Few colleagues see any issue here, understandably. The utter lack of affirmation by anyone I've talked to makes me question my position more than I otherwise would.

Perspectives and comments, please? (Thank God for this forum).

[FONT=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Resolution of Respect[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]
I pledge from this day forward to do my best to combat prejudice and to stop those who, because of hate or ignorance, would hurt anyone or violate their civil rights. I will try at all times to be aware of my own biases and seek to gain understanding of those who I perceive as being different from myself. I will speak out against all forms of prejudice and discrimination. I will reach out to support those who are targets of hate. I will think about specific ways my community members can promote respect for people and create a prejudice-free zone. I firmly believe that one person can make a difference and that no person can be an "innocent" bystander when it comes to opposing hate. I recognize that respecting individual dignity, achieving equality and promoting intergroup harmony are the responsibilities of all people. By signing this pledge, I commit myself to creating a community that is No Place for HateTM.
[/FONT]

[/quote]

Hiyas:)
I would be one of the kids - not signing this oath.

Social Justice is one thing - Liberation Theology.. is an entirely different thing.
They ADL ], are really talking about government / public coercion to accomplish social goals aligning to their own thinking.

IMHO: This is an attempt of a political party agenda and not about the social goals.

So often, their ideas about "social justice' are idiosyncratic. In short, it sounds good - but it is coercion. Coercion intended to publicly bring me in-line to their way thinking. Liberation Theologists want us all to think / act like them - all little soldiers neat in a line.

When I don't sign, I will be ostracized by my peers. This then, becomes reverse discrimination.

Do I believe that we shouldn't be hateful toward others? Yes
Do I believe public coercion has a place in school? No

As always, just my thoughts


#14

I can see it now, the progressives are going to have our high school students opening the day with the following hymn soon:

"Golly, I wish Obama was my dad,
he's the greatest leader we've ever had

Discrimination sure is bad
makes my fellow humans really sad"


Next thing you know, they'll be taking away the national anthem because it's too patriotic and not "globally minded."


#15

Type these up and ask for signatures:

**1935 **The equality of men rests essentially on their dignity as persons and the rights that flow from it:

Every form of social or cultural discrimination in fundamental personal rights on the grounds of sex, race, color, social conditions, language, or religion must be curbed and eradicated as incompatible with God's design.

**2358 **The number of men and women who have deep-seated homosexual tendencies is not negligible. This inclination, which is objectively disordered, constitutes for most of them a trial. They must be accepted with respect, compassion, and sensitivity. Every sign of unjust discrimination in their regard should be avoided. These persons are called to fulfill God's will in their lives and, if they are Christians, to unite to the sacrifice of the Lord's Cross the difficulties they may encounter from their condition.

*2433 *Access to employment and to professions must be open to all without unjust discrimination: men and women, healthy and disabled, natives and immigrants. For its part society should, according to circumstances, help citizens find work and employment.


#16

[quote="Rascalking, post:8, topic:190484"]
The point is how you deliver it, I think. Do you say, "I hate you because your X". Or do you say, "Golly, X might not be the best way to live your life...I love you as a brother/sister in Christ and don't want to see you hurt yourself in the long rin..."

Never forget that there IS bigotry, discrimination, and prejudice in this world. No matter who it is geared towards, it's sickening to all decent people. The ADL might be off on this or that issue, but I still admire them, for the most part.

Just my thoughts...

[/quote]

Very true, as someone else stated. And, since the party originating the pledge (the ADL) has made it clear that they consider a position denying homosexual rights as "hatred" or at least "prejudice," this pledge is starting to look more and more to me as a slam-dunk NO.

To my knowledge, the Anti-defamation League has shown no such ability to distinguish between "I think homosexual behavior is wrong" and "I hate homosexuals." No such ability whatsoever to make that distinction. They are quite intolerant and prejudicial on that, unless I'm badly informed.

Am I wrong to think that their placing this anti-hate pledge before the kids can amount to an indictment of their parents' and their own principles? That this therefore must go throught parents, at the very least?

peace.
John


#17

[quote="john_ennis, post:1, topic:190484"]
The large high school I teach at is planning on having the students sign the Anti-defamation League's "No Place for Hate" pledge, which is a promise to take no part in, and to act against, forms of prejudicial hatred. The pledge as worded is not explicitly objectionable (I've pasted it below). It is a rewording of a previous ADL pledge which included views disagreeing with homosexuality as "hatred" (naturally terming this "homophobia"). Homosexual rights has long been part of their mission.

Long story short: I wrote to the principal that to have the kids sign ANY sort of oath "gives me the creeps." I said that the ADL's well-established view of what they consider "hatred" makes this the kind of thing that should be presented to parents first. It's "parents' territory."

Few colleagues see any issue here, understandably. The utter lack of affirmation by anyone I've talked to makes me question my position more than I otherwise would.

Perspectives and comments, please? (Thank God for this forum).

[FONT=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Resolution of Respect
I pledge from this day forward to do my best to combat prejudice **and to stop those who, because of hate or ignorance, would hurt anyone or violate their civil rights. I will try at all times to be aware of my own biases and seek to gain understanding of those who I perceive as being different from myself. **I will speak out against all forms of prejudice and discrimination. I will reach out to support those who are targets of hate. I will think about specific ways my community members can promote respect for people and create a prejudice-free zone. I firmly believe that one person can make a difference and that no person can be an "innocent" bystander when it comes to opposing hate. I recognize that respecting individual dignity, achieving equality and promoting intergroup harmony are the responsibilities of all people. By signing this pledge, I commit myself to creating a community that is No Place for HateTM.
[/FONT]

[/quote]

I think it's completely inappropriate to ask high school students to sign this. It is essentially asking them to lie, because they're not going to go out and start reaching out to minorities and building "prejudice free zones".

They're not going to go out and actively try stopping people who are prejudiced, nor are they going to speak out against "all forms of discrimination".

The promises in this pledge sounds like enough things to make it a full time job, and high schools have no business pressuring their students to sign a lie.


#18

FFFFF, as if! Do they really think that means anything to highschoolers? Take it from someone who's school days were a living hell of torment and teasing. It doesn't matter how long you drill "be nice, play nice, don't bully!" into their heads. THEY DON'T CARE. They'll alwayts do it anyway. That piece of paper will mean NOTHING to them


#19

[quote="kage_ar, post:15, topic:190484"]
Type these up and ask for signatures:

**1935 **The equality of men rests essentially on their dignity as persons and the rights that flow from it:

Every form of social or cultural discrimination in fundamental personal rights on the grounds of sex, race, color, social conditions, language, or religion must be curbed and eradicated as incompatible with God's design.

**2358 **The number of men and women who have deep-seated homosexual tendencies is not negligible. This inclination, which is objectively disordered, constitutes for most of them a trial. They must be accepted with respect, compassion, and sensitivity. Every sign of unjust discrimination in their regard should be avoided. These persons are called to fulfill God's will in their lives and, if they are Christians, to unite to the sacrifice of the Lord's Cross the difficulties they may encounter from their condition.

*2433 *Access to employment and to professions must be open to all without unjust discrimination: men and women, healthy and disabled, natives and immigrants. For its part society should, according to circumstances, help citizens find work and employment.

[/quote]

Honestly, that's not a bad idea. Really. Ask them to at least offer this "alongside" the other one.


#20

[quote="1ke, post:2, topic:190484"]
Nope. I wouldn't have anything to do with it, and I agree parents should be informed. This is not something the school should be engaging in. Social engineering is the goal of progressives. It is nowhere more demonstrated than in public schools. You are spot on.

[/quote]

Just out of curiosity for those who are against teenagers signing this, what part in here do you find objectionable? Could you quote that part for me? I can't find anything in here that is objectionable.

Resolution of Respect

I pledge from this day forward to do my best to combat prejudice and to stop those who, because of hate or ignorance, would hurt anyone or violate their civil rights. I will try at all times to be aware of my own biases and seek to gain understanding of those who I perceive as being different from myself. I will speak out against all forms of prejudice and discrimination. I will reach out to support those who are targets of hate. I will think about specific ways my community members can promote respect for people and create a prejudice-free zone. I firmly believe that one person can make a difference and that no person can be an "innocent" bystander when it comes to opposing hate. I recognize that respecting individual dignity, achieving equality and promoting intergroup harmony are the responsibilities of all people. By signing this pledge, I commit myself to creating a community that is No Place for HateTM.


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