My soul rejoices in God my Savior


#1

At the risk of opening up yet another Mary is/is not sinless, doesn’t the phrase “[size=3]My soul rejoices in God my Savior” tell us something that we’ve never covered (at least I haven’t seen it)?

Doesn’t this imply that Mary has already been saved. If Mary was saved by Jesus on the Cross, wouldn’t she say,[/size]*[FONT=Arial] “My Soul rejoices in God Who will save me”.

[/FONT][FONT=Arial]Maybe one of you Greek experts can help me out?[/FONT][FONT=Arial]
[/FONT]*


#2

No need for Greek. Mary indeed needed a Savior, since she was born of the race of Adam, and subject to original sin. So she needed a Redeemer just like the rest of us. However, she was saved in anticipation of the Cross (that is, the merits of Calvary were applied to her backwards in time), unlike the rest of us who were saved subsequent to it. There’s no problem with this because Calvary transcends time. Using the famous example, the rest of us fell into the mud and Christ pulled us out and washed us. Mary was stopped from falling in at all. In both cases, both we and Mary were saved, but in different manners.

It’s necessary, otherwise, she could not be kecharitomene, and grace comes only from the Cross.


#3

” tell us something that we’ve never covered (at least I haven’t seen it)?

Doesn’t this imply that Mary has already been saved. If Mary was saved by Jesus on the Cross, wouldn’t she say,*[FONT=Arial] “My Soul rejoices in God Who will save me”.

[/FONT][FONT=Arial]Maybe one of you Greek experts can help me out?[/FONT][FONT=Arial]

  • [/FONT]I see it as expressing her salvation by the special application of the future sacrifice of Christ.

It is possible that Mary received a special infusion of knowledge of the faith. She might well be the first believer to be so infused.[/FONT][/size]


#4

God is spoken of as Savior, in the present tense numerous places in the Old Testament. The following is just one example. I doubt anyone would say David was sinless.

And David spoke the words of this song to the LORD in the day that the LORD delivered him from the hand of all his enemies and from the hand of Saul. He said, "The LORD is my rock and my fortress and my deliverer; My God, my rock, in whom I take refuge, My shield and the horn of my salvation, my stronghold and my refuge; My savior, You save me from violence.
(2 Samuel 22:1-3)


#5

Many people refer to God my Savior prior to Christ. You will find this all through the Psalms as well. Of course Mary needed a saviour, she is a mortal human being. However, we tend to think in terms of space and time, while God is not limited to such. God applied the merits of Christ’s sacrifice in advance to Mary.


#6

Protestants who have trouble with this forget that Eve was also created without sin, so there is a precedent for it.


#7

Sycarl, isn’t David simply referring to the temporal effects of God’s saving him. He saved him from the violence of his enemies.

Was David sinless? Bathsheba’s bath, the first “Watergate”, is certainly evidence against that!!!


#8

Kimberly Hahn once spoke of a high school classmate who was “squeaky clean”. When he was giving his testimony in front of a youth group, he said that God had delivered him from drug use and sexual immorality.
Kimberly thought that was strange since he had been such a clean living Christian his whole life.
He then went on to say that God had delivered him by giving him Godly Parents, who raised him to stay clear of those things.

Kimberly says that this shows us that God can deliver you from sin, before you commit those sins.


#9

I don’t think Mary was subject to original sin–according to Catholics.


#10

Mary need not be referring to salvation from sin when she calls God her Savior. In fact, sin is not mentioned at all in her Magnificat. She may simply mean that God has done great things for her and saved her from childlessness. Or, more probably, she may mean that she is so certain, because of the angel’s words in verse 32-33, that the son who has been conceived in her womb will assume the throne of his ancestor David and save her and the rest of the Jews from their earthly enemies (the proud, the mighty, and the rich) that she speaks of it as if it had already happened, as the Old Testament prophets sometimes did when they prophesied.


#11

That makes a little more sense, Todd.

The Jews then (I do not know now) considered their people’s salvation as their own.

God bless
Aaron


closed #12

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