NABRE problems?


#1

[size=]**Dear Brothers and Sisters in the SACRED HEART!

I have been perusing a NABRE that was released in 2010/2011. I know that NAB bashing is considered a sport on the forums :p, but what about the NABRE? From the bits and pieces I have read, it doesn’t sound too bad. Albeit I dislike the “favored one” instead of the actual “Full of Grace” (Nothing that pen and ink won’t fix) and the inclusive langauge (However I noticed that the NABRE doesn’t go out of its way to put inclusive language in, unlike the NRSV which is purely inclusive, NOT the RSV-CE 2nd edition which is not inclusive). Apart from those two little things, I think it’s OK. Anyone else on these forums with more wisdom than me wanna chip in?

Please Note: I do love the Douay Rheims (I own the one published by TAN) however I don’t want to A) subject it to the abuse that a backpack, frequent handling and reading etc will inflict on it (Its the brand new leather one) and B) For meditation I love the poetic language that the DR provides, however for daily reading/study I prefer vocabulary that isn’t base, but isn’t 1+ century old either.

Please chip in!

I Also know that the footnotes in the original NAB caused concern.I have heard of the heterodox and scary footnotes. Is this still the case with the NABRE? If it is still the case, then I won’t pay attention to the footnotes at the bottom. **[/size]


#2

In my studies I use the RSV-CE, but for devotional reading, I always go back to the NAB. My original copy was the original edition from 1970, I believe, and did not have the inclusive language that some of the later editions I have come across do. I really like the NABRE. As far as footnotes, I do not use the footnotes when I am praying, so it really doesn’t matter what they are like.

In the end, the best bible is the one you will read! :wink:


#3

In the end, the best bible is the one you will read!

True!

I prefer the RSV-CE myself. To me, the NAB dumbs things down too much; it leaves some of the subtle nuances out, even to the point of being inaccurate. I find that to be condescending; it assumes that its readers are too dumb to understand the finer points.

But filter what I said above through my besetting sin of pride; in this case, intellectual snobbery.:blush: :rolleyes:


#4

I believe that a new translation for America is long overdue. Apparently, the NAB/RE had to be modified for liturgical use, and so what we buy isn’t even exactly what is used at mass. The USCCB owns the copyright on the NAB/RE and profits from their sale. :hmmm:

Oh! A Presbyterian minister :eek: was involved in the original NAB translation, as were several lay professors and theologians. In my preferred bible (the Confraternity), the revisers were all ordained clergy.

I ripped the notes out of my NAB Study bible and burned them. :mad:


#5

I like the NABRE, I also use the RSV-2CE. The OT is improved (especially the Psalms), there are few translation choices that were not popular (virgin to young woman - Isaiah 7:14), but overall it reads smoothly.


#6

I used to have the NABRE on both of my computers (laptops), but a few weeks ago I gave away the license for it (together with a whole bunch of books, most of them old) to a poor person who lives on a disability income and has only $7 left each month, who specifically was interested in Roman Catholic books. So now I only have it on my small laptop without license. One consequence of that is that my notes and highlightings are no longer safe and will last only as long as the computer lasts.
I still have it as printed matter: Oxford, gilded edges, leather imitation cover, large print.

But I very rarely use it for comparing anymore.

If You want to see which Bible version I use, see: forums.catholic.com/showpost.php?p=10757928&postcount=31, look especially at the link to accordancebible.com!:

[quote="CalCatholic, post:5, topic:326694"]
I like the NABRE, I also use the RSV-2CE. The OT is improved (especially the Psalms), there are few translation choices that were not popular (virgin to young woman - Isaiah 7:14), but overall it reads smoothly.

[/quote]


#7

[quote="mymamamary, post:1, topic:326694"]
[size=]**Dear Brothers and Sisters in the SACRED HEART!

I have been perusing a NABRE that was released in 2010/2011. I know that NAB bashing is considered a sport on the forums :p, but what about the NABRE? From the bits and pieces I have read, it doesn't sound too bad. Albeit I dislike the "favored one" instead of the actual "Full of Grace" (Nothing that pen and ink won't fix) and the inclusive langauge (However I noticed that the NABRE doesn't go out of its way to put inclusive language in, unlike the NRSV which is purely inclusive, NOT the RSV-CE 2nd edition which is not inclusive). Apart from those two little things, I think it's OK. Anyone else on these forums with more wisdom than me wanna chip in?

Please Note: I do love the Douay Rheims (I own the one published by TAN) however I don't want to A) subject it to the abuse that a backpack, frequent handling and reading etc will inflict on it (Its the brand new leather one) and B) For meditation I love the poetic language that the DR provides, however for daily reading/study I prefer vocabulary that isn't base, but isn't 1+ century old either.

Please chip in!

I Also know that the footnotes in the original NAB caused concern.I have heard of the heterodox and scary footnotes. Is this still the case with the NABRE? If it is still the case, then I won't pay attention to the footnotes at the bottom. **[/size]

[/quote]

I don't have a problem with the NABRE (2011). I actually find myself using it a lot for private devotion and prayer.

I am a Catholic revert and during my years away from the Church I got heavily into reading Scriptures, so I would go buy different translations at used book stores and at clearance sections on other stores and I got almost every single translation out there :o.

Since I have been back to the Church, I have also gotten into reading the Church Fathers and their commentaries and homilies (Chrisostom homilies and Aquinas Catena are my favorite ones). I no longer have this need to know what the word means and fight over translations. Of course, I already have great resources in my private collection and I only use them when discussing things with my separated brethren. For this I use the RSV 2CE/RSV-CE.

I also discovered that if I prefer certain words/phrases from one translation to the other, I can easily write it on my favorite Bible :cool:, so I draw a line over the word/phrase I don't like and write in mine. And it becomes my own translation :D

As for footnotes, I read them. I don't have to take them to heart, if I have a doubt I'll go to the Church Fathers and Haydock, Hahn, and other great catholic orthodox commentaries.

What I really enjoy, a lot more, than footnotes are cross-references. I enjoy reading passages that are related to each other.

Prayer > footnotes
Reading Scripture > footnotes

:D

Peace,

Jose


#8

For a child is born to us, a son is given us; upon his shoulder dominion rests. They name him Wonder-Counselor, God-Hero, Father-Forever, Prince of Peace. Isa 9:5 NAB

Whenever I read that I cringe.


#9

You mean Isaiah 9:6? :wink:

Getting my Bible pen

6 For to us a child is born, to us a son is given; and the government will be upon his shoulder, and his name will be called “Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.”

Problem solved :smiley:


#10

**After reading that:

For a child is born to us, a son is given us; upon his shoulder dominion rests. They name him Wonder-Counselor, God-Hero, Father-Forever, Prince of Peace. Isa 9:5 NAB

I' think I'll stay with my Douay. **


#11

[bibledrb]Isaiah 9:5[/bibledrb]

Guys, why do you keep quoting Isaiah 9:5?

Regardless of translation, we must first make sure we have the correct verse, no? :wink:

:cool:


#12

Sorry, slip of the finger 9:6
For a child is born to us, a son is given us; upon his shoulder dominion rests. They name him Wonder-Counselor, God-Hero, Father-Forever, Prince of Peace. Isa 9:6 NAB


#13

[quote="po18guy, post:4, topic:326694"]

Oh! A Presbyterian minister :eek: was involved in the original NAB translation, as were several lay professors and theologians. In my preferred bible (the Confraternity), the revisers were all ordained clergy.

I ripped the notes out of my NAB Study bible and burned them. :mad:

[/quote]

22. Easy access to Sacred Scripture should be provided for all the Christian faithful. That is why the Church from the very beginning accepted as her own that very ancient Greek translation; of the Old Testament which is called the septuagint; and she has always given a place of honor to other Eastern translations and Latin ones especially the Latin translation known as the vulgate. But since the word of God should be accessible at all times, the Church by her authority and with maternal concern sees to it that suitable and correct translations are made into different languages, especially from the original texts of the sacred books. **And should the opportunity arise and the Church authorities approve, if these translations are produced in cooperation with the separated brethren as well, all Christians will be able to use them.* *

(Dei Verbum)

I see this more as a positive aspect than a negative aspect. :thumbsup:


#14

I guess I’m not fussy. I’ll read the NAB, RSV-CE, GNT, or KJV. Whichever one gets through this sometimes hard head and heart to follow Jesus’ commandments to love God and neighbor.:slight_smile:


#15

I wish that the bishops would go back to the old Confraternity translation. It is reverent and readable. If it ain't broke, don't fix it.


#16

[quote="mymamamary, post:1, topic:326694"]
Albeit I dislike the "favored one" instead of the actual "Full of Grace"

[/quote]

Not that I particularly like 'favored one', but 'plena gratia' isn't quite an exact translation of the original 'kecharitomene', either... ;)


#17

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.