NATO says Russia could be poised to invade Ukraine


#1

(Reuters) - Russia has amassed around 20,000 combat-ready troops on Ukraine’s eastern border and could use the pretext of a humanitarian or peace-keeping mission to invade, NATO said on Wednesday.

Stating the conflict in Ukraine was fueled by Russia, NATO said in a statement that the troop build-up had further escalated “a dangerous situation”.

“We’re not going to guess what’s on Russia’s mind, but we can see what Russia is doing on the ground – and that is of great concern. Russia has amassed around 20,000 combat-ready troops on Ukraine’s eastern border,” NATO spokeswoman Oana Lungescu said in an emailed statement.

NATO was concerned that Moscow could use “the pretext of a humanitarian or peace-keeping mission as an excuse to send troops into Eastern Ukraine”, she said.

reuters.com/article/2014/08/06/us-ukraine-crisis-nato-idUSKBN0G613M20140806?utm_source=twitter


#2

They’ve been poised to do that for a while now.


#3

It may very well be time that we all prayed for an act of God to put a stop to this nonsense. Humans are never going to get it done. Not on our own.


#4

NATO seems to be a little slow on the uptake; Russia already invaded Ukraine a few months ago.


#5

Yes, but surreptiously so, in other words, this will be an outright invasion if it occurs.


#6

The Ukrainians will prove, just as they did in World War II, that they will be very difficult to beat. That said, NATO will either send in peackeeping troops and help in negotiations or arms will flow to true patriots, and the Russian surrogates will be killed off.

My study of recent actions by others in the Ukraine show a clear pattern.

Peace,
Ed


#7

I wouldn’t want to see Russia invade Eastern Ukraine, but in the event of a humanitarian crisis in Donetsk, I think it justifiable for Russia to carry out airstrikes on the attacking Ukrainian army.


#8

Why is NATO declaring anything at this point?? Doesn’t the NATO treaty state that the NATO alliance will defend a NATO member if it is attacked? Is Ukraine a NATO member?

This is the type of ridiculousness that starts from the West. Wars first, talks, occupation and quagmires afterwards, and always in that order…


#9

Ukraine is not a member of NATO.

The West will not fight Russia directly in a military sense over this. The rest of the world can sense America’s weakness and declining global power.

That’s a consequence of having Democrats in the White House.


#10

What humanitarian crisis? The one manufactured by Russia??


#11

Things are not looking good for Russia.

kyivpost.com/hot/eu-ukraine-relations/

Peace,
Ed


#12

At this point and with that plane shot down. I’d have to agree. However, if we’re truly in a world economy(which we appear to be), in the long term, this conflict can’t be good when we’re trying to weaken one of the worlds largest economies(Russia).

I’m not exactly sure what Mr Putin has planned for this(the BRICS):

rt.com/politics/official-word/172768-putin-brics-economies-alliance/

but this alliance if it ever truly became a world player in world economics could have disastrous long term implications for America. We sanction Russia with Oil, Russia goes to Iran, we sanction Russia’s goods, they go to China, we sanction Russia’s agriculture they go to Brazil. What all these nations have in common is they want to get out of the Dollar. When food and energy ceases to be priced in US Dollar denomination, we’re going to get crushed. Our economic power globally is not what we produce, but that everyone buys, sells and trades using our currency to price goods.

Again, by that article Mr Putin doesn’t appear to be threatening he’d start to push that BRIC alliance against the West in response to our sanctions, if he does get cornered, he has that option. The US government knows this,and that’s a move they don’t want Putin to make. The past 2 administrations have been trying to weaken our Dollar so our exports could compete on world markets. The BRIC alliance weakening our Dollar and not our government would force us to raise interest rates, and the interest they pay on our debt would skyrocket.

Say what you want about Putin, but he’s certainly no dummy, and he’s quite a tactician. He’s one leader against the entire Western establishment, and for an underdog, he’s holding his own.


#13

Russia really is not one of the world’s great economies. In terms of GDP per capita, by most measures, it’s way down on the list, below countries like Seychelles, Lativa and Barbados. Well below Mexico. It is of no great concern to the U.S. if Russia imports from China if Russians can’t afford to buy their products, and probably not even if they could.

Russian exports to and imports from the U.S. are about 1% of the total, in each case. The biggest American agricultural export to Russia is poultry. But poultry production is extremely elastic, and the exports of poultry to Asia are growing. Besides, Russia banned that earlier in the year on a pretext anyway, which it often does. So…

One thing that needs to be realized is that all dollars leaving the country have to return in some manner or they are worthless. Those holding dollars can buy American goods, invest in the American markets or buy American assets. Among those assets are American debt instruments. It’s unfortunate that the U.S. has a lot of debt to finance. If it didn’t, a lot of foreign dollars would be forced to buy American goods. But debt instruments are kind of a trap for the unwary too. If interest rates go up (which they surely will sometime after the 2014 elections, and definitely after the 2016 elections) the cost of NEW American debt goes up, but the value of OLD American debt goes down. If the U.S. prints money (short of world refusal to accept it, and I think it’s a long way from that) and it’s inflationary, then foreign debt value goes WAY down. If America then reduced its borrowing and if interest rates went up, then everybody holding dollars or debt instruments are going to take a bath. I suspect the other countries know all of that and take it into consideration in their trading.

That’s what America did to Japan, in a way, in the 1980s and 1990s, or what Japan did to itself. Japan bought inflated American debt and assets, then watched them plunge when inflation rates dropped and disinflation began. Possibly the Japanese knew it would happen and thought it was better to do it even so. Maybe they miscalculated. I don’t know.


#14

I believe Russia will invade Ukraine with troops. I also think this has been in the pipeline for awhile, its been said that Russia and China are buddy buddy and they have a long term plan and are sticking to that plan…the last part of this (from what Ive heard involves Russian troops coming into the western US), but not sure if this is just conspiracy theories or something that is actually on the table.


#15

This is what the EU and the US are banking on in their calculated move with the Ukraine. They must have known full well that Russia’s feathers were going to get ruffled as we encroached on their sphere of influence.

I do agree that Russia is not one of the great economies, but they’re certainly not a small or insignificant one that has been sanctioned like an Iran either: money.cnn.com/news/economy/world_economies_gdp/ If little itty bitty Greece could roil markets like they did a few years ago, I can’t see why Russia tensions couldn’t.

The implications of sanctions still remain for the EU. Europe collectively is the worlds largest economy. Larger than the US if you group them together. Certainly Europe has been a customer of Russia, and that very important commodity to the customer has been oil and gas. Europe has been slumping bad, way worse than the US and near recession yet again. Why they decided on this Ukraine endeavour now when they’re in the economic condition they’re in makes you wonder what exactly are they attempting to do. Tactically they are not outmanoeuvring Putin, With the cold winter in a few months, why sanction him now in the dead of summer? Why not wait until after the Winter when Russia couldn’t pull the plug on the energy resources Europe needs.?

I’m sure the ECB is nervous about this: marketwatch.com/story/ecbs-draghi-gauges-russian-risks-to-eu-recovery-2014-08-07 If the EU were in a stronger economic position, these moves they’ve made may be justified given the risks, but I think these decisions were highly risky and way too impulsive. It’s way too early at this point to know who’s got the upper hand and who’s made the better moves, And as we all know, sanctions take a while to kick in.


#16

Maybe Russia will get their processed chicken from China?! :rolleyes:


#17

No, Putin and his crowd will just make Russians do without; “For the Motherland!” “For Stalin!..oops…For Putin”! Nothing unusual in Russia.


#18

I am part Ukrainian. Putin does not understand the fanatical nationalism in the Ukraine and other Eastern European countries, including Lithuania. America has its hands dirty as well. They attempted to get oil from an area that resulted in the following statement from the Russians: “This is a threat to our national security.” A pipeline was to be built that would get that oil to Turkey and the Americans would sell it. Without a proper understanding of what is going on regarding all the major players in the region, this whole ‘invade Ukraine’ thing is not nonsense.

However, if Poland, Lithuania and patriot Ukrainian forces join together, likely pulling in other EU, and non-EU countries, Putin will have a lot to worry about.

en.ria.ru/world/20140303/188042051/Ruble-Dives-to-Historic-Low-Stocks-Crash-on-Ukraine-Fears.html

After the Russian occupation forces left the Ukraine, the Ukrainian people insisted on their own currency and that their children be taught Ukrainian, not Russian, in schools.

Peace,
Ed


#19

History did not start just 20 years ago.

However, if Poland, Lithuania and patriot Ukrainian forces join together, likely pulling in other EU, and non-EU countries, Putin will have a lot to worry about.

That will not happen. Right and Centrist people - are just as weary of Ukrainian nationalism as of the Sov… Russian one. While Russia is a bigger threat to Poland, people remember OUN/UPA massacres of Polish women and children and see both sides with a skeptical eye. Let’s just say Polish people don’t trust either side too much.

Poland’s main job is to secure US bases in Poland. They’re in Germany, a country which during the 1980’s Martial Law actually seemed to root for the Communist Jaruzelski Government (because of fear of loss of repayments). At that time only Britain and Reagan’s USA stood with Poland’s Solidarity Movement. Germany feels safe and does not want any US bases to move to Poland.

However involvement with Ukraine should not be Poland’s priority. It’s not a primary security issue. US permanent presence in Poland is. And since US soldiers are in Germany some of them could be permanently in Poland too. Unless of course Poles don’t deserve that while Germans do and maybe Anglo-Saxon people may sometimes think this way.


#20

Poles and Ukrainians might not be drinking buddies, but I feel pretty confident the Poles would prefer to have an independent Ukraine on their border than an expanding Russian empire.


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