Need help with my Confirmation Class


#1

Good morning to all!
I teach Confirmation at my Parish, and the interest of the students is non-exsistent. I’ve tried various activities, but they are so quiet, and don’t speak up, even to disagree. Do any of you have suggestions to get their interest? Any field trips? Topics? Books? Thanks for any help.


#2

[quote=happyrubberband]Good morning to all!
I teach Confirmation at my Parish, and the interest of the students is non-exsistent. I’ve tried various activities, but they are so quiet, and don’t speak up, even to disagree. Do any of you have suggestions to get their interest? Any field trips? Topics? Books? Thanks for any help.
[/quote]

do they realize what confirmation is??

“A sacrament in which the Holy Ghost is given to those already baptized in order to make them strong and perfect Christians and soldiers of Jesus Christ.” “New Advent Catholic Encyclopedia”

soldiers for Jesus Christ… they should be getting into a
battle frenzy… lol

:slight_smile:


#3

[quote=happyrubberband]Good morning to all!
I teach Confirmation at my Parish, and the interest of the students is non-exsistent. I’ve tried various activities, but they are so quiet, and don’t speak up, even to disagree. Do any of you have suggestions to get their interest? Any field trips? Topics? Books? Thanks for any help.
[/quote]

What size is your group?
What is the age range?
What have you already tried?


#4

I wasn’t excited with my Confirmation class either. I enjoyed going to the dentist more.

My personal peeve with the RCC is that the Sacraments that matter most (imho) are all instituted at too young of an age for children and teens to really comprehend and be actively interested in. I think it would be much better to wait until a child shows personal interest in learning more about Christ before you force them to go off to CCD and Confirmation classes.

I wish that I had the option wait, because now I’m struggling with my faith in the RCC, and feel like I wasted all these Sacraments because I didn’t really have it in my heart to go through them with a real devotion to Christ. I’m Baptized and Confirmed, but I don’t feel like it means anything anymore. :frowning:


#5

You don’t say what age they are? However the Church says that Catechesis must meet people where they are. Most young people do have questions about their Catholic Faith and do get challenges from their non-Catholic friends. Help them answer these questions and they will become more interested. Right now they as asked why do you (Catholics) worship Saints and Mary instead of Christ? They don’t know that Catholics don’t worship Mary and the Saints. They have never been taught how to respond.


#6

[quote=GodSoldier]I wasn’t excited with my Confirmation class either. I enjoyed going to the dentist more.

My personal peeve with the RCC is that the Sacraments that matter most (imho) are all instituted at too young of an age for children and teens to really comprehend and be actively interested in. I think it would be much better to wait until a child shows personal interest in learning more about Christ before you force them to go off to CCD and Confirmation classes.

I wish that I had the option wait, because now I’m struggling with my faith in the RCC, and feel like I wasted all these Sacraments because I didn’t really have it in my heart to go through them with a real devotion to Christ. I’m Baptized and Confirmed, but I don’t feel like it means anything anymore. :frowning:
[/quote]

you can reaffirm it in your heart every day…

but, i can understand what you are saying… i’m a convert…
i was baptised at 50… i’ll be confirmed this comming Easter…
i am excited… i am going thru RCIA for my second time,
and enjoying it even more… i was so ready to be a part of
the Church… it was as powerful as anything the most
evangelical protestant could imagine… :slight_smile: i know,
i had attended protestant churchs exclusively until 4 years
ago…

so, i understand how receiving the sacrements so young
could make them seem… less than they are… but just because
you have received them already, and can’t receive them again,
doesn’t mean you can’t reaffirm your devotion to them…

:slight_smile:


#7

you don’t say the age, but at whatever age I am betting they have been dragged their kicking and screaming by their parents who want them to have a coming-of-age ritual, and that neither parents or kids have a notion of the true meaning of the sacrament.

In this diocese Confirmation is at age 16, and we have two types of kids in class–those that have been coming more or less regularly to CCD and Mass (or Catholic grade school), and whose parents are practicing the faith. The other kind have not been inside a CCD class or in many cases been to Mass or confession since first communion, and don’t have a clue. Oddly enough, the second group is more hungry to learn.

What they want more than anything is truth, unvarnished, on Catholic belief, morality and practice. They are hungry for the truth. They get watered-down “culturally sensitive” teaching on tolerance and diversity in school. What they crave is the Word of God proclaimed clearly and help applying that Word to their own lives and problems. Any resource you can find to help you there, to foster a habit of regular scripture reading and prayer, is essential.

Have an anonymous question box, research their questions so you can give authorotative answers and deal with questions for part (not all) of every session. If the priest can come for these sessions that is ideal.

One of the most successful things we tried came about by accident. We had adult Catholics in need of Confirmation who could not attend Sunday classes due to work, travel etc. so we gave them the option of participating in High School classes as aides and picking up on the teaching. They have witnessed to their own struggles, reasons for not getting confirmed earlier, their own faith journeys, and the hunger they are now experiencing for the sacraments.

We have actually had HS kids confirmed in May serve as sponsors for adults confirmed at Pentecost, and recently confirmed adults returning as sponsors for HS kids. This has been very powerful and an example of how the Holy Spirit works in this whole process. We also have RCIA candidates and neophytes come to some classes and retreats and give their testimony.

a challenge they face here in Southern Baptist Land is questions from their non-Catholic friends and Catholic-bashing in peer groups, plus a lot of pressure to join youth groups at other churches. contemplationcornerpress.com has an excellent book called Rock Its a Catholic Thing written by and for teens in this situation in a Q&A format on truths of the faith. They love it and is is a great discussion starter. They sell a Confirmation Pack with this book, Rosary book (meditations with pix put together by teens), Scripture journal, and new discipleship resource based on the Sermon on the Mount, for about $15, probably group discounts available. With this and a good student bible - NAB New International Student bible from Thomas Nelson is excellent, good Q&A on various topics, you are on your way.


#8

Our diocese confirms in Grade 7, around age 12 or 13. To keep their attention and make learning fun, I create games from the information I want them to learn.

I regulary make up cards with questions on one side and answers on the other. Then we play a variety of games with these cards, from physical games like Bible Baseball where they have to answer a question instead of hitting a ball, and Ping Pong, where every time you miss the ball you have to answer a question, to card games where we lay the cards face down and the youth select someone to answer the question of their choosing. We also play X’s and O’s with the cards, where each turn requires a correct response to the question on the card.

I find these games make for good attendance and good memory retention. The youth also have fun, as there is lots of laughing and participation.


#9

Wow! What great ideas!!! Thanks to everyone that responded! My students are about hs freshman age. It’s a class of about 12. I’ve tried different things like saint trivia, watching tapes, listening to cds, asking questions. We’ve only had 3 sessions, so I’ll definitely be using some of these ideas. I have also been toying with the idea of taking them to a monastary for the mid course retreat.
Thanks again!!


#10

Happyrubberband:

I suggest a lot of personal prayer and reflection on each student first and foremost. Secondly, I’d challenge them to tough questions like: There’s 30,000 other Christian groups out there, which one is right?

Although the classes are focused on the gifts of the HS, I think a good dose of apologetics should go first in order to set the table so they can really map out what the Sacrament of Confirmation is.

A video from an episode of the Journey Home might be good, they might see what other people go through just to become Catholic and they are born in it already!

God bless you and your apostolate.

in XT.


#11

[quote=happyrubberband]Wow! What great ideas!!! Thanks to everyone that responded! My students are about hs freshman age. It’s a class of about 12. I’ve tried different things like saint trivia, watching tapes, listening to cds, asking questions. We’ve only had 3 sessions, so I’ll definitely be using some of these ideas. I have also been toying with the idea of taking them to a monastary for the mid course retreat.
Thanks again!!
[/quote]

I think you could teach class with only a newspaper and a Catechism. There are SO many current events that touch directly at the heart of Catholic teaching. The students will likely have formed opinions on these things, and not always the Catholic opinion but rather what they hear from friends, teachers, parents.

Perhaps they would engage in discussion of something that doesn’t seem “churchy” and then you smack them with what the Church says about the topic. You can tie it easily to the Ten Commandments, the Creed, the Sacraments, the Bible… sooo many options.

Maybe also look into Pillar of Fire, Pillar of Truth from Catholic Answers.


#12

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