Netherlands: Doctor administered euthanasia to protesting woman, asked family to hold her down


#1

“The woman refused a cup of coffee containing a sedative and when she struggled, the doctor asked her husband and daughter to hold her down so she could insert a drip containing the lethal injection.”

“The case is the first time since the Dutch euthanasia law was passed in 2002 that a practitioner has been formally censured.”


#2

Oh, but my no, the slope is not slippery.

Mmmm hmmmm.

And it has taken this long for someone to be censured?

Really???


#3

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#5

Sorry but all 3 are responsible and at fault.


#6

Yes, they were a team.


#7

Nice family she had there.


#8

We have not all the article. It is an absolute evil murder.

And not a first time such a case appears in a country that has legalized euthasia, Belgium, Netherlands etc…


#9

God is the giver of life and as such he alone has the right to take life. These doctors are by definition violating their oath to do no harm. Sad.


#10

No offense, but if she was truly suffering from severe dementia, etc., “she” isn’t there anymore. What’s left is a physical shell with some autonomic nervous system activity.


#11

What a horrible thing to say.
I work with folks with dementia. They are not just a mindless shell.
They are disabled. And they still have dignity.
Just because you feel uncomfortable around them doesn’t mean they deserve to die.

SMH


#12

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#13

My grandmother had dimentia. Although it is sad to see them lose their autonomy, at least they can be loved and cared for :slightly_smiling_face:

She stayed at a nice facility in Cleveland and was quite comfortable. Yeah, she didn’t recognize us but she appreciated us keeping her company and bringing her cookies :sweat_smile:


#14

On more than one occasion, I’ve had a withdrawn, barely verbal resident come out with some complex sentence that was relevant to the circumstances.

A person with dementia’s level of awareness and conversational skills can fluctuate.


#15

My grandmother would fall asleep about every 5 minutes then she’d reboot and it was a new conversation. We’d wheel her outside into the garden area so she could enjoy the sunshine :sunny::blush:

She really appreciated us bringing her shortbread cookies :cookie:


#16

But the point being, she was no less your gramma.
She was your gramma with-a-disease.


#17

That goes without saying, you and I know that; however Explain that to @Seeksadvice :confused:


#18

Sure, it’s offensive!
How can you say that?
Do you ahve already known and carry for a person with “dementia”?

They are not brain-dead, or not even in “vegetative state”.

Of course, she is always here, and deserved respect and dignity. Her life is valuable.


#19

Even if that was the case,and her family did it for compassion reasons and not because they perceived her as a burden or were trying to access her money,the doctor should never have agreed to it if the woman herself had not signed a pre-directive that she wanted euthanasia when her condition got really bad.

The doctor would have known the laws but chose to disregard them.
Whether that was due to a misguided sense of compassion,or something more sinister,the article does not offer that information.

Interestingly,it sounds like it was a female doctor too according to the article.

I know Catholics are supposed to be against euthanasia,but personally I am no always against euthanasia because things like severe Dementia can be horrible.
Sometimes a person does retain their personality,but other times,realistically they do become like a “shell”.
It is truly awful for someone to suffer like this.
At the same time though I believe it should only even be self chosen and never ever because of a family member or society (or doctors) viewing them as a burden.
That is truly horrible.

My concern,even with self chosen Dementia though,is the worry that it can set a society that is intolerant to suffering and differences and devalues people with serious illnesses .
Even (actually especially!!) if someone becomes “a shell”, they should still be surrounded by love,helped,honoured and greatly valued.


#20

JPII (Evangelium Vitae):

"Even when not motivated by a selfish refusal to be burdened with the life of someone who is suffering, euthanasia must be called a false mercy, and indeed a disturbing “perversion” of mercy. True “compassion” leads to sharing another’s pain; it does not kill the person whose suffering we cannot bear. "


#21

I understand that that is the Catholic view.
That’s why I wrote:

I fully accept that my view is not shared by the Catholic Church.

Perhaps I would change my view more if it was Catholics that were with the suffering individuals 24 hours a day and sharing with their suffering but in reality that is only usually on Sundays or other days the family is able to attend church.
Most of the time spent everyday is with paid care workers (sometimes substandard ones) in nursing homes,not with loving Catholics sharing in the suffering.
(Except occasional volunteers).
The Catholic Church rightly talks that true compassion is sharing in the person with Dementias suffering but I don’t know how often that’s really happening on a day to day basic in reality.
In reality,they are often suffering in nursing homes,while other Catholics are being preoccupied with things such as paying off their mortgages or taking their kids to extra curricular activities etc…

I know that’s not the case for everyone and they are some very loving Catholic people with loved ones with Dementia who they are with a lot,but the sad truth is there are others who don’t have as much family love or time.

Sometimes I think that I would like to volunteer to visit the people in nursing home who don’t receive enough love,but i worry that with this stupid “overboard regulation society” that they will make you jump through every hoop before allowing you to help/visit…


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