Never Been to a Latin Mass?

linenonthehedgerow.blogspot.com/2014/02/never-been-to-latin-mass.html?showComment=1393175195530

You are in for a disappointment.

I mean, I do believe that sometimes those of us who adhere to the EF Mass really ramp it up too much.

We rave and rant about how mystical, reverent and inspirational it is and then - for the first time visitor it’s so-ooo quiet.

And the priest has his back to the congregation so you feel just a little bit…er…ignored?

You came expecting the Latin, of course, but you have no idea when to stand, kneel or genuflect…and you just know that everyone is looking at you, waiting to see you make some fundamental mistake like sitting down when the rest of the congregation stand.

You come away bewildered and asking yourself what all the fuss was about.

Next week it’ll be back to the jolly old Ordinary Form, so much easier, and it’s all in English (unless you happen to go to a Tagalog/Polish/Chinese/Urdu/Swahili Mass).

So let’s dispel some myths.

First, don’t feel unwanted just because there are no greeters on hand to give you a leery smile and an even leerier hug before you enter the church.

“I’m the parish greeter, but they won’t have me at the Latin Masses!”

We at the traditional end of the Faith just happen to believe that you are grown up and should be treated like one, we are confident that you can find a pew in the church without some creep good soul guiding you to your seat.

Next, don’t worry about everyone watching you - we are all so intently devout (ahem) that we would not notice if Noddy and Big Ears marched in to Mass.

And as for sitting, kneeling and standing…do nothing until you feel that you know what is what - and that may take quite a few visits.

Just sit and watch and pray.
You don’t even have to follow the prayers of the Mass, you may pray to yourself or just meditate and soak up all that is taking place.

But, if you feel that the above advice is just a bit too laid back, here are a few key essentials that you may like to observe:-

  1. Genuflect before entering your pew and, again on leaving when Mass has finished (not when you go up to receive Holy Communion or return).

  2. Wear a mantilla, hat or scarf (if you are a woman) and if you wish to do so - it’s a personal choice and no one will condemn you for going bareheaded.

  3. Receive Holy Communion kneeling (if you are able, by all means stand if you are infirm) and by mouth. If you have not done this before just close your eyes and open your mouth reasonably wide with your tongue resting on your lower lip. The priest is adept at placing the Host gently on your tongue.

And that’s just about it, really.

But don’t expect to love the old Mass immediately. It takes time to establish itself in the hearts, minds and souls of those who have not experienced reverence, piety and peace in church before.

But there is one other effect from attending a Latin Mass that our old priest always emphasized when he sat round the dining table after a meal.

“The Latin Mass” he would say: “Brings special graces to those who attend”

And he was right.

I am not sure what your point is. I haven’t been to a Latin Mass because my husband who grew up with it, did not like it and wants nothing to do with it. I am so turned off by the superiority attitudes of it’s promoters that I am not sure either. There isn’t any extra special graces to go to EF Mass over the OF Mass, it is the same Jesus isn’t it? Beside that, I do genuflect when going into the pew as well as coming out. My question to you would be, how is going to a EF Mass making you a better Catholic the rest of the week? does it make you more loving, understanding, more kind and more tolerant/

:thumbsup:

To be fair, I don’t think the OP wrote this; this is a blog post that he has kindly (sic) provided for our reading pleasure.

I wish I had the latin mass available to me!

I don’t.

Instead, we have a very reverent OF Mass that in which the Propers and Ordinary are in Latin Gregorian chant with French plainchant for the rest. Beautiful enough and reverent enough as far as I’m concerned.

Why on earth label greeters as “creep good souls” with “leery smiles” and “even leerier hugs”?

These are awful things to say about friendly Christian people who want to reach out and welcome people to church. Shame on the blogger for name-calling. Apparently the blogger’s religion is not teaching him/her to be kind.

OP, it’s OK to prefer silence and anonymity in church, and to avoid human touch and contact.

But you need to be aware that there are so many MANY lonely people who have little contact during the week with other Christians due to income, job situation, living situation, age, at home with very young children, etc.

These people truly like having a friendly person say, “Good morning, Welcome!” and shake their hands.

I agree that a hug is probably going too far unless the people know each other. But you don’t know the situations that others come from, and it’s very likely that a lot of those hugs are given between people who DO know each other, or at least know the situation. After my dad died, a LOT of people in my parish gave me a hug, and I appreciated that.

Like it or not, OP, one of the main reasons cited by those who LEAVE the Catholic Church is a lack of friendliness.

You can deny this all you want and try to put a “traditional spin” on the surveys and claim that these people really don’t want friendliness, they want “something else” (e.g., more incense, silence in the Mass, chant instead of piano music, etc.).

But the facts are the facts–over and over, surveys state that people leave the Catholic Church (and Protestant churches as well) because of a LACK OF FRIENDLINESS.

Yes, I understand that to you, friendliness might mean something different than a smile and a welcome handshake. I agree that friendliness goes much deeper than that. ** But friendliness has to start somewhere, and a good place for it to start is with a smile and a word or gesture of greeting. **

I occasionally attend Latin Mass in my city, and I find that the people are very friendly and show that friendliness by smiling at me, shaking hands, and whispering, “Welcome.”

That sounds great to me! :slight_smile:

I do feel blessed :slight_smile:

It’s a Benedictine abbey of the Solesmes Congregation. Liturgy is their “thing” as it were.

A lot of people hearing just a few words in Latin get offended, especially Gregorian chant, so you get extra credit. :thumbsup:

“Muscular Christianity”, perhaps? :stuck_out_tongue:

But you need to be aware that there are so many MANY lonely people who have little contact during the week with other Christians due to income, job situation, living situation, age, at home with very young children, etc.

These people truly like having a friendly person say, “Good morning, Welcome!” and shake their hands.

True. A random act of kindness can go a long way! :slight_smile:

I agree that a hug is probably going too far unless the people know each other.

No debate here! :slight_smile:

But you don’t know the situations that others come from, and it’s very likely that a lot of those hugs are given between people who DO know each other, or at least know the situation. After my dad died, a LOT of people in my parish gave me a hug, and I appreciated that.

Sorry to hear about that. May he rest in peace. :slight_smile:

Like it or not, OP, one of the main reasons cited by those who LEAVE the Catholic Church is a lack of friendliness.

Very true.

Love for the Traditional Mass does not excuse some of the language that this blogger does. (And if, like me, you get your hackles raised easily, please don’t read the article on the OF Mass on that site. “Troll” doesn’t begin to describe it. :()

Well, I am sure that there are some. But we can also say that there are some who are very extreme in their support of the Traditional Latin Mass that they are not the most charitable people either towards those who do not do as they do. Is that fair, to judge the whole crowd based on the actions of some? There will always be people on both sides who do not set the best example. I think the best way to attract people to the EF is by example of what effect the EF is having on you and how you grow in love toward your neighbor.

How do you know there are “special” graces at the EF, with the implication that these graces cannot be received at the OF? I am one who loves the TLM, but like others, I don’t care for this kind of elitism. The graces we receive, no matter which rite we observe, are dependent on us, on our own spiritual state. The Word of God tells us that God looks on a humble and contrite heart, not the form of Mass we attend.

I agree with you completely, but: :popcorn:

Those of you who are upset at this phrase special graces: how, exactly, do you understand that term?

I just complimented someone who had just put down the EF. How is that not being charitable, if that’s what you’re implying? Just trying to find some common ground here.

You are trying to take my words as personally directed to you and they were not.

Why does one valid form of the Mass have “special” graces over another valid form of the Mass? Isn’t Christ present in both Masses? Don’t you believe that people who attend the OF receive as many graces as those who attend the EF?

Fortunately most people at the abbey go there specifically to hear Latin and Gregorian chant. You have to go out of your way to go there (it’s a 35 minute drive for me but worth every minute as it’s through splendid Appalachian scenery).

Our schola sang (Gregorian chant) at a parish Mass at a Saturday evening Mass in Sherbrooke, QC on Sunday. We were very well received, especially by the priest who is a big fan. Some parishes don’t want anything to do with us. Oddly we seem to get a better reception at younger parishes (though this one was an older demographic).

We even have a “groupie”, a provincial policeman who when off duty always makes sure he attends Mass at the parish we’re singing at (we rotate to a different parish and sing once a month). I seem to recall he even came in uniform once, after or before a shift.

I haven’t been to a Latin Mass, but I used to attend an Orthodox (OCA) church with some friends. Hopefully that prepared me a little for when I visit the FSSP parish in my city.

Claiming that one form of the Mass imparts “special graces” that the other does not is against Church teaching and forum rules.

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