New Advent Catholic Encyclopedia is too cerebral for me


#1

I’d like to learn more about catholic history but I am finding the Catholic Encyclopedia difficult to follow although it’s very thorough. Would someone know of any other catholic history online that would be easier for me to follow?


#2

[quote=Loboto-Me]I’d like to learn more about catholic history but I am finding the Catholic Encyclopedia difficult to follow although it’s very thorough. Would someone know of any other catholic history online that would be easier for me to follow?
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Maybe you would be interested in these Courses… Very good and they are free. Simple to use and a great help all around.

amm.org/chss.htm


#3

These seem like great courses, I’ll look into them.

I guess I’ll ask someone here, what was the reason behind burning and scattering John Wycliffe’s bones? Why did the Pope at that time want to do that to a heretic? I don’t care one way or another, but I’m in conversation with someone who is upset about this and is trying to use this as a reason to mistrust Catholics.


#4

[quote=Loboto-Me]These seem like great courses, I’ll look into them.

I guess I’ll ask someone here, what was the reason behind burning and scattering John Wycliffe’s bones? Why did the Pope at that time want to do that to a heretic? I don’t care one way or another, but I’m in conversation with someone who is upset about this and is trying to use this as a reason to mistrust Catholics.
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Likely to prevent the veneration of his relics by his followers… anyone with a better idea?


#5

[quote=Loboto-Me]These seem like great courses, I’ll look into them.

I guess I’ll ask someone here, what was the reason behind burning and scattering John Wycliffe’s bones? Why did the Pope at that time want to do that to a heretic? I don’t care one way or another, but I’m in conversation with someone who is upset about this and is trying to use this as a reason to mistrust Catholics.
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The reason is that the Pope is capable of sinning, of course. Such attacks do not bother me at all. It is unfortunate and I wish they never happened, but the Pope is not impeccable. He is only infallible when preaching Ex Cathedra. What does a Pope’s personal sin have to do with Catholicism? Is this person under the impression that clerics and even the apostles themselves could not sin?


#6

[quote=Loboto-Me]I’d like to learn more about catholic history but I am finding the Catholic Encyclopedia difficult to follow although it’s very thorough. Would someone know of any other catholic history online that would be easier for me to follow?
[/quote]

**The Catholic Encyclopedia is the best. It’s not too cerebral, I don’t know what you mean by too cerebral, sorry. **


#7

Roman,

I think you’re right, they’re under that impression. I’ve tried showing bible verses to the contrary but to no avail. I think I may have to repeat myself once more with those verses.

By cerebral I mean that I can’t seem to “follow” it. I’m jumping all over the place trying to put the stories together (I have A.D.D) because I can’t understand some of the wording. I’m not a “quick study” and the style of speech and wording in the Encyclopedia isn’t helping me get any “quicker” :wink:


#8

“Westminster and Canterbury combined to put pressure on the still reluctant university authorities. A number of prominent Wyclifites were forced to make retractations (cf. LOLLARDS), but nothing seems to have been demanded from the leader of the movement except a promise not to preach. He retired to Lutterworth and, though he continued to write voluminously both in Latin and English, remained there undisturbed till his death. He was probably cited to Rome but he was too infirm to obey. Indeed he was probably paralyzed during the last two years of his life. A second stroke came in 1384 while he was hearing Mass in his church, and three days later he died. He was buried at Lutterworth, but the Council of Constance in 1415 ordered his remains to be taken up and cast out. This was done in 1428.” -Catholic Encyclopedia, John Wyclif

“In the eighth session it was question of Wyclif, whose writings had already been condemned at the Council of Rome (1412-13) under John XXIII. In this session forty-five propositions of Wyclif, already condemned by the universities of Paris and Prague, were censured as heretical, and in a later session another long list of 260 errors. All his writings were ordered to be burned and his body was condemned to be dug up and cast out of consecrated ground (this was not done until 1428 under Bishop Robert Fleming of Lincoln).”-Catholic Encyclopedia, Council of Constance, section III. The Repression of Heresy

According to the Catholic Encyclopedia, Wyclif died in 1384, but he was not condemned until the Council of Rome which was in 1412-1413. So, this means he recieved proper burrial rites through the Church when he shouldn’t have. Therefore the Council of Constance in 1428 ordered his body to be dug up and cast out. It also ordered that his heretical writings be burned. There is no indication that his body was burned up and scattered. That’s an exaggeration. So, I take back my previous post, this was not a sin, this was based on the fact that the Church is not supposed to burry heretics. This was not ordered by the Pope but by a Council in communion with the Pope.


#9

See? You read all of that and figured out a possiblity of why his bones would have been exhumed. That’s not something that’s easy for me to do. Thank you so much for giving me the simple version :slight_smile:

As for his bones being burned and scattered, I googled his name and many of the sites I came up with say that that is what happened to them.


#10

[quote=Loboto-Me]See? You read all of that and figured out a possiblity of why his bones would have been exhumed. That’s not something that’s easy for me to do. Thank you so much for giving me the simple version :slight_smile:

As for his bones being burned and scattered, I googled his name and many of the sites I came up with say that that is what happened to them.
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Well, if that was the case, then that was to prevent proper burrial and also to prevent the heretics from venerating the body or giving it sometype of honor that he didn’t deserve.


#11

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