New Age healing for an psychotic Catholic?


#1

I told my cousin who has a degree in psychology that I have obsessive compulsive disorder because she told me that I was being consumed by my religion. She used to be Catholic but is New Age now… She said that psychologists treat the mind only but science has shown that memories are ingrained in the body too and unless you treat the body, the brokeness will remain. She said its all about God and angels and love. She wants to do some massage on me, with clinging bells that apparently open up my energy channels hahahaha and release the blockages. I don’t know if there is reiki involved but she has done courses but isn’t at the level of where she can charge money (how ridiculous, that doesn’t make sense) haha but yeah, I’m a little unsure about what to do. I’m so desperate for healing that I’m willing to try everything. But I’m also very Catholic and don’t want to do it if it is occult like and sinful. Apparently we are allowed to use alternative healing techniques as long as we don’t get involved in the spirituality of it…:shrug:


#2

It is true that patterns exist for the body, but they are patterns that exist in the neural pathways of the brain.

It is how an athlete can improve. With repetitive practice eventually the neural pathways are created and the person will say something along the lines of what was once difficult, is now second nature.


#3

Stay away from any and all New Age stuff…no matter how benign it appears.


#4

I would be more concerned that someone who is not licensed as a psychotherapist or other practioner is claiming to offer healing for a serious condition, mental, psychological, physical, or otherwise. Just having a degree in a subject does not qualify one to give treatment. Some things like massage, accupuncture etc. can be beneficial in several ways, but attempted by someone who does not have the proper training can do real damage. Just because it is not a therapy from the western medical tradition does not make it automatically new age, and just because some proponents of “new age” spiritualities also happen to promote some of these alternative medical therapies does not make them wrong, bad or useless. I would be very wary of anyone who claims to treat serious mental health issues without any credentials.


#5

To the OP, I’d approach it all with a healthy dose skepticism. A degree is no indication of competency or integrity. I’ve known Dr.s who are seriously lacking in both. And neither is the counter-culture to reject modern medicine an indication of competency or integrity. There is not a shortage of quackery in the world.

There are people in both groups who prey on the sick, and, there are people in both groups who have a real talent for healing and a desire to cause no harm. For someone with psychological issues, I’d be wary of causing more harm to the person, and wouldn’t accept or offer just any old treatment that blows in.


#6

I would stay away from this… and I don’t think it can really heal anyone. (except perhaps by deception, leading the person into error)


#7

She wants to do some massage on me, with clinging bells that apparently open up my energy channels hahahaha and release the blockages. I don’t know if there is reiki involved but she has done courses but isn’t at the level of where she can charge money (how ridiculous, that doesn’t make sense) haha but yeah, I’m a little unsure about what to do.

Here is something for you to think about. New Age and New Thought both have a basis in the heretical view that God is not a person but some kind of “energy.” They also put forth the idea that because some of this energy (God) resides in you, you - if they can “unclog” your pipes, spiritual, mental, or physical - are free to tap into this energy and use it to your own benefit and gain, in this case, healing.

So stop and think about that a second. If you can just get past some kind of “block,” you are not at God’s service, He is at YOUR service, just like the genie in Aladdin’s lamp, only you get more than 3 wishes. Is that consistent with your beliefs?

That is what you are in for. Could be bells, another popular one is “singing bowls,” drum circles, even “ancient Egyptian rods.” Snake oil comes in many bottles with many different labels, but it’s still snake oil. For some reason, many psychiatrists love NA/NT stuff because it plays to the strength of their concepts of the human mind, as though psychology and spirituality are the same train on the same track going to the same place. The source of these liberating energies is always some nebulous, external spirit force that they very anxiously slap the label of God upon to lend it validity, but nowhere will it ever conform to anything an established religion ever taught you about God. Nowhere in any religion (except theirs) can the power of God be summoned on demand by even the highest person in the religious hierarchy. Knowing that, do you think God will respond to bells being rung in concert with message by an un-certified, un-sanctified individual just because they want to help?

Cough up the $50 and go to a licensed masseuse, bring a relaxing music CD and headphones, and skip the bells. You’ll get every benefit without compromising your beliefs.


#8

NO… don’t do it. Treat your OCD with your psychotherapist. She is right that your body needs treatment as well. Sick to a registered massage therapist who treats the body and makes no claims to unblocking any spiritual gateways etc. Massage is great for circulation, it releases endorphins (happy hormones) and releases stress as well as toxins. I also recommend exercise and proper nutrition.

From a spiritual POV. Avail yourself of the sacraments, most importantly Penance and Eucharist. Go to confession often and see if you can talk to your pastor about spiritual deliverance. That will help too. Constant prayer, Eucharistic Adoration, will help you out.

Stay away from New Age as it is dangerous.

JESUS CHRIST THE BEARER OF THE WATER OF LIFE: A Christian reflection on the “New Age”

Seven Steps to Self-Deliverance

Another great resource on deliverance is a book called Unbound by Neal Lozano…

God Bless.


#9

Anything that uses language such as “energy” and “chackras”…stay away from. That is definitely “New Age” and can initiate many problems.


#10

I come from an age-old very well known Catholic family - in fact, my family connections with the church go back to Roman times here in the Europe.

I started experiencing severe heart problems a few years ago and was put on medication. But it didn’t solve the underlying problems. In fact, I thought I was dying. Couldn’t work - could barely live, etc.

After trying foot massage, which helped a bit, I ended up giving Reiki a go - and I haven’t had any problems for a long time now. I could feel the powerful energy and the healing. I am attuned now and can send energy to myself.

I’m not sure that something like the Reiki I experienced, which is purely focussed on healing, is harmful. Spiritually, I am what I have always been - a Catholic. And that will never change.


#11

I suggest to anyone who has praises for Reiki to read the book “Ransomed from Darkness” by Moira Noonan.

Reiki was one of the ways she entered into new age practices. She had been in an accident and was suffering physically and she went to a Reiki practitioner and said it helped. Then she began to take instructions in how to become a Reiki healer. It involved having a spirit guide. Through that she began interest in many other new age practices, and she was tormented by the presence of evil.

Thanks be to God and the intercession of Our Lady, she got away from it all. She describes a priest who helped her, and it took two days, a total of 14 hours, for her confession in all her involvements, and exorcism.


#12

The book sounds interesting. My experience of Reiki definitely didn’t involve spirit guides or anything else of that nature. I wasn’t asked to ‘believe’ - though I guess care does have to be taken in your choice of healer.

I’m not even sure whether Reiki should be seen as New Age really - it was founded by Usui Mikao, a lay Tendai priest, who died in 1926. My experience has been completely positive.


#13

Reiki is Japanese witchcraft. Its Buddhist. I’d rather stay away from it, no matter how tempting it sounds. Its a counterfeit of laying on of hands. It might work but just because it works does not mean that its holy and approved of by Jesus, our God of healing.:slight_smile:


#14

Avoid Reiki! It is New Age. I used to want to be involved. Read up on the practice. Watched people doing a “reiki” chain. (They all passed energy from one to the other- it was completely G rated.) There is so much creepiness in Reikie. I’m sure your psychiatrist can help you find effective meds and therapy!


#15

I really don’t think a psychiatrist would be much help in curing a diagnosed physical defect of the heart. I was put on medication, which made me feel dreadful and actually made the symptoms worse.

There were undoubtedly pre-Christian Eastern influences on some of my forefathers - Christian holy men who lived as hermits within the Celtic Christian tradition.

In my view, the Reiki I experienced is yet another Eastern tradition / practice, like asceticism, which could be of great benefit to many of us. And, seeing that it pre-dates the New Age movement of the 60s, and was totally devoid of anything spiritual in my experience, I’m not sure whether it should even be called ‘New Age’. Though I guess many New Age types would naturally be drawn to it.


#16

Here is a site that may be informative to you:

cuf.org/faithfacts/details_view.asp?ffID=200

Incidentally, it is my understanding that “spirit guides” are not made evident by the Reiki practitioner. They don’t boast about this – it is possible they aren’t totally aware of the evil involved and believe that they are doing good – just like Moira Noonan when she started out in it. The term “new age” is an umbrella term used for spiritual seeking outside of Christianity. No, there is nothing new about it. :slight_smile:
They perform the reiki calling upon the energy of the universe. It is the use of occult powers, and contradictory to Christianity.


#17

OP specifically referred to a mental health condition. In any case with something as grave as that, or a chronic severe physical challenge like heart disease, it is hardly wise to abandon conventional medicine for unlicensed healers of any ilk. We cannot get into medical advice on this forum, but if someone feels the current treatment is not working they need to communicate with their doctor before randomly dipping in to alternative therapies offered by practioners with no proven licensing or competence.


#18

I received broad advice and did in fact take things very carefully, monitoring progress. And still am self-monitoring with various interesting devices. Two of my immediate family work as doctors, so that helped :-).

I’m still not convinced Reiki is a problem. Having just scanned the internet, I found several nuns practicing Reiki and even a Jesuit priest who is a ‘Zen Roshi’. Surely ‘action’ would be taken if these Eastern practices were seen as such a threat?

This really isn’t such an issue on this side of the pond, though I’ll ask the priest again on Sunday - he seemed very OK with things when I explained I was having treatment. Perhaps US Catholics feel less rooted in their core beliefs. You know, my Catholic family lineage (priests, monks, holy men, key supporters of the faith) goes back to Roman times in my locality, so I don’t feel my Catholicism is threatened in any way.


#19

Actually, it is a problem that Catholic nuns are doing reiki. There are Catholic nuns holding Reiki classes in the US.

For some of us, we avoid reiki because we believe it conflicts with our Catholic beliefs. Some of us don’t like the idea of “healing” energy or using “spirit guides”. Read The Everything Guide to Reiki. It convinced me to walk away.


#20

Heart problem = cardiologist.


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