New age medicine


#1

I am looking for some links to articles that debunk new age medicinal techniques. I know someone who is being drawn into this type of gnosticism beacause of her health problems. Of particular interest would be information on medical intuitives, holistic medicine, universal life force, universal energy, energy medicine, and vibrational medicine. Any assistance would be appreciated.


#2

[quote=Mickey]I am looking for some links to articles that debunk new age medicinal techniques. I know someone who is being drawn into this type of gnosticism beacause of her health problems. Of particular interest would be information on medical intuitives, holistic medicine, universal life force, universal energy, energy medicine, and vibrational medicine. Any assistance would be appreciated.
[/quote]

I’m glad you didn’t mention acupuncture, because that has some pretty reputable evidence behind it.


#3

[quote=Mickey]I am looking for some links to articles that debunk new age medicinal techniques. I know someone who is being drawn into this type of gnosticism beacause of her health problems. Of particular interest would be information on medical intuitives, holistic medicine, universal life force, universal energy, energy medicine, and vibrational medicine. Any assistance would be appreciated.
[/quote]

Don’t be so quick to discount anything that is merely associated with so-called “new age medicine”. “Energy medicine,” depending on the “energy” involved, does have an effect in healing: check out this from the NIH’s institute on complementary and alternative healing.

Acupuncture, which is based (supposedly) on energy, has received some very serious attention. Here’s an excerpt from the NIH:

According to the NIH Consensus Statement on Acupuncture, there have been many studies on acupuncture’s potential usefulness, but results have been mixed because of complexities with study design and size, as well as difficulties with choosing and using [/font]placebos or sham acupuncture. However, promising results have emerged, showing efficacy of acupuncture, for example, in adult postoperative and chemotherapy nausea and vomiting and in postoperative dental pain. There are other situations–such as addiction, stroke rehabilitation, headache, menstrual cramps, tennis elbow, [/font]fibromyalgia, myofascial pain, osteoarthritis, low-back pain, carpal tunnel syndrome, and asthma–in which acupuncture may be useful as an adjunct treatment or an acceptable alternative or be included in a comprehensive management program. An NCCAM-funded study recently showed that acupuncture provides pain relief, improves function for people with osteoarthritis of the knee, and serves as an effective complement to standard care.[/font]7 Further research is likely to uncover additional areas where acupuncture interventions will be useful.[/font]8


#4

Mickey,
Despite Ahimsa’s defense of acupuncture which, IMO, is not the kind of New Age “healing” you’re talking about anyway, try the link below.
Clare McGrath-Merkle was heavily into New Age healing until a reversion to Catholocism. I heard her interview on CA Live. She knows her stuff. You might even check the archives, I think it was just last week.

crossveil.org/

Hope this helps.


#5

[quote=Strider]Mickey,
Despite Ahimsa’s defense of acupuncture which, IMO, is not the kind of New Age “healing” you’re talking about anyway, try the link below.
Clare McGrath-Merkle was heavily into New Age healing until a reversion to Catholocism. I heard her interview on CA Live. She knows her stuff. You might even check the archives, I think it was just last week.

crossveil.org/

Hope this helps.
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Thank you Strider. You are correct. Acupunture is not the concern here (although I do not condone it’s use). I will check your link.


#6

Yoga has been studied and shown to improve health. In particular, studies of blood pressure have demonstrated that meditation lowers BP.


#7

[quote=Mickey]I am looking for some links to articles that debunk new age medicinal techniques. I know someone who is being drawn into this type of gnosticism beacause of her health problems. Of particular interest would be information on medical intuitives, holistic medicine, universal life force, universal energy, energy medicine, and vibrational medicine. Any assistance would be appreciated.
[/quote]

Yet, acupuncture is part of “energy medicine”, as the links to the NIH show. It seems to me that terms like “holistic medicine”, “universal energy” (which is another name for “chi”, the basis of the Chinese understanding for how acupuncture works), and “vibrational medicine” are actually quite mainstream (at least in terms of the NIH links’ terminologies). There is nothing “gnostic” about them at all.


#8

[quote=Mickey]Thank you Strider. You are correct. Acupunture is not the concern here (although I do not condone it’s use). I will check your link.
[/quote]

Are you one of those folks that believe a pill, surgery or something else prescribed by a doctor is the only RIGHT way to go?


#9

Health wise – daily habits: exercise (yoga, walking, weights, dance), thee cups of green tea each day, eat plenty of green vegetables, vitamins, sunlight a must, work and play in moderation, happy thoughts, a decent amount of sleep, quarterly dentle cleaning, and never-never-ever forget the yearly physical examination by a professional doctor. :thumbsup:


#10

[quote=Ortho]Yoga has been studied and shown to improve health. In particular, studies of blood pressure have demonstrated that meditation lowers BP.
[/quote]

Yoga, if used exclusively for exercise, is perfectly acceptable for Catholics. There is, however, a mystic, Eastern dimention to Yoga, TM, and other Eastern comtempletive methods that are not benign and are counter to Catholic teaching.

Karin,
I can’t answer for Mickey, but for myself, no, I believe that there are herbal concoctions that can be beneficial to health.
The question, though, was about Eastern healing practices, particularly “energy” medecine.
These are inimical to Catholic teaching, but have become popular with many Catholics, even uninformed or dissenting clergy.
If you’re interested, visit the link I provided. There is a lot of good information there.


#11

[quote=wildleafblower]Health wise – daily habits: exercise (yoga, walking, weights, dance), thee cups of green tea each day, eat plenty of green vegetables, vitamins, sunlight a must, work and play in moderation, happy thoughts, a decent amount of sleep, quarterly dentle cleaning, and never-never-ever forget the yearly physical examination by a professional doctor. :thumbsup:
[/quote]

Green tea and yoga.
Is that the new age version of green eggs and ham?:smiley:


#12

[quote=Strider]Yoga, if used exclusively for exercise, is perfectly acceptable for Catholics. There is, however, a mystic, Eastern dimention to Yoga, TM, and other Eastern comtempletive methods that are not benign and are counter to Catholic teaching.

Karin,
I can’t answer for Mickey, but for myself, no, I believe that there are herbal concoctions that can be beneficial to health.
The question, though, was about Eastern healing practices, particularly “energy” medecine.
These are inimical to Catholic teaching, but have become popular with many Catholics, even uninformed or dissenting clergy.
If you’re interested, visit the link I provided. There is a lot of good information there.
[/quote]

There may be Eastern aspects to yoga, but yogic meditation still lowers blood pressure.


#13

I believe the Lancet published a fairly scathing critique of homeopathy sometime recently. And that’s not even necessary, really; a chemist could tell you that homeopathy is a load of hooey.


#14

[quote=EnterTheBowser]I believe the Lancet published a fairly scathing critique of homeopathy sometime recently. And that’s not even necessary, really; a chemist could tell you that homeopathy is a load of hooey.
[/quote]

NIH notes homeopathy’s lack of therapeutic efficacy:

Homeopathy
One Western approach with implications for energy medicine is homeopathy… Homeopathic medicine is based on the principle of similars, and remedies are often prescribed in high dilutions. In most cases, the dilution may not contain any molecules of the original agents at all. As a consequence, homoeopathic remedies, at least when applied in high dilutions, cannot act by pharmacological means. Theories for a potential mechanism of action invoke the homeopathic solution, therefore, postulating that information is stored in the dilution process by physical means. Other than a study reported by the Benveniste laboratory17 and other smaller studies, this hypothesis has not been supported by scientific research. There have been numerous clinical studies of homeopathic approaches, but systematic reviews point out the overall poor quality and inconsistency of these studies.18


#15

[quote=Ortho]There may be Eastern aspects to yoga, but yogic meditation still lowers blood pressure.
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So does Eucharistic adoration.


#16

[quote=Strider]So does Eucharistic adoration.
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Has that been put to a test?

What is involved in Eucharistic Adoration? Is it meditation? What does one do? It may be very similar to Eastern meditation.


#17

[quote=Karin]Are you one of those folks that believe a pill, surgery or something else prescribed by a doctor is the only RIGHT way to go?
[/quote]

“One of those folks” :hmmm: Well let’s see.

I don’t believe in yoga as a spritual practice (only excersice). I don’t buy into reikki, enneagram, vibrational medicine, holistic medicine, homeopathy, psychic healing, and things of this nature. I’m not sure about accupunture. I believe in The Holy Trinity along with a healthy diet, excersice and traditional medicine. Does that make me “one of those folks”?


#18

[quote=Mickey]I am looking for some links to articles that debunk new age medicinal techniques. I know someone who is being drawn into this type of gnosticism beacause of her health problems. Of particular interest would be information on medical intuitives, holistic medicine, universal life force, universal energy, energy medicine, and vibrational medicine. Any assistance would be appreciated.
[/quote]

Why are you trying to debunk? If it provides a benefit to somebody, so what?


#19

[quote=mikew262]Why are you trying to debunk? If it provides a benefit to somebody, so what?
[/quote]

I do not think it would be possible to prove that new-age practices are beneficial.


#20

[quote=Mickey]I do not think it would be possible to prove that new-age practices are beneficial.
[/quote]

Or rather, more beneficial than a placebo.


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