New Game(?) - Count the sins on TV

I’ve been thinking about this for a while and so I decided to see what others thought…

As Christians, as Parents and Grandparents, as Teachers, we are all concerned about what is on television these days.
Yet, in many cases we really don’t want to completely give up the boob-tube because there is the occasional good thing on, or we use it for relaxation etc…

Then I got to thinking…How could we turn the negative into a positive?
Suppose we use the programs to illustrate and teach. I was thinking it might work something like this.
Make a list of the ten commandments.
Watch a show - maybe even record it. (can be anything from drama to comedy to cartoons)
Each time someone commits a sin, put a checkmark next to the commandment.
At the conclusion of the show…jot down if the “moral” was a good one or a bad one. In other words what was taught.
Turn the TV off, and compare notes on the number and types of sins…
Talk about it… does everyone have the same counts? Where are the differences? etc…
Maybe even go back and review a portion ofthe program to discuss…

It seems that this could be used in the home, in the classroom, bible study, pretty much anywhere that people wish to see and talk about sin in “real life”.

Thoughts? Ideas? Modifications? critiques?

Peace
James

Neat idea… but I think I’m going to have to pass.

I usually don’t turn on shows that I can’t even watch the previews for.

Some of the commercials for these shows are so bad that I have to watch TV with

my hand on either the MUTE button or the JUMP button to switch the channel.

When I see these ads I usually say out load… “Another great family time show”

of course it is said with as much sarcasm as to not confuse. Another great saying of mine

is “Oh Brother, more network SLUDGE”

Again I think this is a great idea and the list would take up many sheets of paper

but in order to do that would mean that I would have to watch the SLUDGE. :eek:

Paul

I gave up TV years ago, not for the shows, but for the COMERICALS.

I could deal with TV in the future now that DVR is popular, but never in the main room of my home.

Playing count the sins is rather judgmental…

That being said in college my professor discussed ethics with movies like the green mile and slingblade. Things like culpibility, etc, were discussed. It was lead by a wonderful ethics professor. I would be careful to lead discussions that could go into territory that you are not solid in.

Phineas and Ferb is a completly clean show. So is Fetch. So what, i watch cartoons.:):smiley:

I disagree. Looking at a program and recognizing that a person is lying, or coveting or being envious, or taking gods name in vein is hardly judgemental - particularly when the characters are fictional and only reading lines given to them by the shows writers and producers.

That being said in college my professor discussed ethics with movies like the green mile and slingblade. Things like culpibility, etc, were discussed. It was lead by a wonderful ethics professor. I would be careful to lead discussions that could go into territory that you are not solid in.

You bring in a good point here by mentioning “college”. Certainly there would need to be care taken to see that the program selected be somewhat age appropriate…
But given that kids are being exposed at younger ages to more mature subjects…The game could afford an opportunity for parents and kids to enter into some serious and helpful dialogue.

Peace
James

Hey, where’s Perry…oh there he is:D yeah, my kids like Phineas and Ferb too! Not a bad show at all.

Then I got to thinking…How could we turn the negative into a positive?
Suppose we use the programs to illustrate and teach. I was thinking it might work something like this.
Make a list of the ten commandments.
Watch a show - maybe even record it. (can be anything from drama to comedy to cartoons)
Each time someone commits a sin, put a checkmark next to the commandment.
At the conclusion of the show…jot down if the “moral” was a good one or a bad one. In other words what was taught.
Turn the TV off, and compare notes on the number and types of sins…
Talk about it… does everyone have the same counts? Where are the differences? etc…
Maybe even go back and review a portion ofthe program to discuss…

I like the idea of watching a show and keeping record of the sins commited. I think I’ll try that tonight! I’ll let you know what I come up with!

It is an interesting idea, but I am also going to have to agree with purplesunshine. It would be very judgmental. If you start looking for the sins of people on TV what would stop you from doing that in “real life.” Especially if it is a younger child you are teaching to do this. In my humble opinion, that could be very harmful and is not a good idea.

Remember today’s Gospel reading - “Let the one among you who is without sin
be the first to throw a stone."

Christ wants us to focus on the positive, the loving! Not the negative and sinful aspects of others.

God bless.

We love, love, love Phineas and Ferb. The most original show in the whole, tri-state area!!!

If you want better programing on TV, the LAST thing you should do is watch shows that are bad. The more people that watch a show, the more the ad time goes for, the longer such show will be on TV and the more shows like it that will be made. If no one watched the ****** shows they would go away.

Watching them to count the sins, still counts in the people watching a show number.

Don’t feed the beast…starve it.

You know what I do? It’s simple, fun and addicting.

Ignore that rubbish on television. Read a book, change the channel, turn the TV off, paint a picture, listen to music-it’s a beautiful world out there. Why get wrapped up in all the “sinfullness” and misery out there? Is that how you want to spend your time? Sure, it might make you feel morally superior, but you’ll lose friends quickly with that “count the sin” attitude. You may say you don’t care about how people think (It’s a lie-99 percent of people actually do care how they are viewed) and even if you “don’t care what people think” do you care about their souls? No one listens to an old grump who just complains all the time.

When I was younger, I loved West Side Story.

I was so worried about the fates of:

Bernardo, it was implied that he and Anita had premarital relations and he killed Riff right before he died.

Tony…he killed Bernardo, and had premarital relations with Maria

The only one who’s fate didn’t worry me so much was Riff, because he was killed first (I didn’t know about any other mortal sins he might have)

I love that musical.

I don’t plan on starting to watch "bad’ shows, just maybe paying a little more attention to the shows I do watch; picking out the more sinful parts of the show and addressing that. I think sometimes we get so used to watching the same show that we block out some of less quality parts or we let them slid because we find the program funny/entertaining. I’m not doing it to judge anyone, just making myself a little more aware of what I really am watching!

Me too…as an adult I can watch without being anxious for the souls of fictional characters. :smiley:

True. I think one of the things we need to realize here is that fiction is fiction. Not that I’m saying that justifies some of the junk Hollywood considers entertainment. However, many of the Greatest works of literature do contain immoral behavior, even the Bible contains stories that show people behaving in immoral ways.

I am not going to worry about the immoral behavior of a fictious character that doesn’t exist in the real world and therefore cannot go to either heaven or hell.

Also I maintain the best way to raise the standards of TV is to NOT watch bad shows.

Thanks for the interesting replies everyone…

I agree that ultimately the best solution is to not watch most of what is put on TV. Even many of the supposedly “moral” shows contain much that we as Catholics should shun.

happymommy, I look forward to what you come up with tonight.

The one response I didn’t really expect and was frankly surprised by was the ones about it being “judgemental”. I can’t really get my mind around this idea…First of all because we are talking about fictional stories and using those fictional stories as a way to teach. I see no problem with assessing the beliefs, actions and decisions of fictional characters to help children and young adults make better decisions in the “real world”

Matt_707 expressed concern about taking the judgemental attitude out into the real world and I suppose that could potentially be a problem…But then again, isn’t one of the problems with the world the fact that we don’t express our displeasure at others sins? I guess I’m unclear on what the “judgemental attitude” would be that is harmful…unless you mean going around with a “holier than thou” attitude which I agree would be non-productive.

Anyway - The idea was just a thought. Thanks for the feedback and feel free to kick in more.

Peace
James

Cant be worse then the drinking game my friends and I played, watchign the English version of Naruto and takign a shot everytime we heard ‘believe it!’…we didint get past episode 4 :blush:

Aside from the obvious observation that this might come off as too judgmental and whiny, it also has holes when analyzing actions within a certain context.

For instance, what if you turn on the TV and already you see a scene where a guy shoots right through a hostage to kill the hostage taker behind her? Initially you might instantly label it a sin but then later on you heard from a friend, who watched the whole episode, that the girl actually permitted the guy to shoot right through her.

The English dub is BLASPHEMY. Nuff said.

You beat me to it, I was going to suggest making it into a drinking game but I think I’d be recommending alcohol poisoning within the first half hour, TV being what it is today.

:rolleyes:

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