New Jerusalem Bible Revision


#1

Hi all, just have a question to ask!

My favourite Bible translation is the New Jerusalem Bible, mainly just because I like how things are phrased, its kind of more.. poetic, or something! Anywhooo, I don't like the use of "Yahweh" in the Old Testament and read something online that the NJB might be being revised to replace "Yahweh" with "Lord/God". Is there any truth in this? Any information appreciated!

God bless :)


#2

The CTS New Catholic Bible is the version that is used for the lectionary in many parts of the world. It is the 1966 Jerusalem Bible (not the "new" version) with a few modifications:

Grail Psalms (these are used for the lectionary in the UK).
The Holy Name is replaced with LORD (exactly what you're looking for, here).

It's available on Amazon if you can't order directly from the Catholic Truth Society.


#3

The CTS New Catholic Bible the 1966 Jerusalem Bible are much better than the NJB. I don't use NJB. I have a Jerusalem Bible whole Bible and a Jerusalem Bible New Testament.

When buying from Amazon.com, enter Amazon through the link on the right at csntm.org/, then the Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts will be given a portion of Your purchase at no cost for You:QUOTE=SonCatcher;10415238]It's available on Amazon if you can't order directly from the Catholic Truth Society.


#4

I’m not really interested in other Bibles, I have the CTS bible amongst others. I’m just looking for info. on the supposed revision of the New Jerusalem Bible. Thanks for your input though :slight_smile:


#5

There is no planned revision of the NJB:

[quote="sealabeag, post:4, topic:316543"]
I'm just looking for info. on the supposed revision of the New Jerusalem Bible.

[/quote]


#6

Okay thanks


#7

Hello. The answer to your query is that the revision is in progress and some parts of the English translation are completed. However, the publishers, Darton, Longman & Todd, are not at all confident that the English edition will ever be published because the Catholic Church in England has decided to adopt the English Standard Version (ESV) as the translation to replace the Jerusalem Bible in the liturgy. This decision may well be duplicated in other English-speaking countries (I can't speak for the USA). It's a question of commercial viability.

That's my latest understanding of the situation but if I hear anything different I will post another message on this thread.

My own feeling about the current NJB is that it is, in some ways, more accurate than the JB, but when I use it for a while I always end up disappointed with some of the choices. For instance, 'Upright/ness' instead of 'Righteous/ness' was quite an unnecessary change. The avoidance of the male gender is not as serious as in the NRSV, but still ends up with some tortuous phraseology, such as in Proverbs and in many other places. The JB has its faults ('happy' in place of 'blessed' was a big mistake) and it's a bit rough and clumsy in places but so is the NJB. For instance, 1 Cor 10.13 - 'put up with it' (!) instead of 'endure', and in the Magnificat, Mary is 'humiliated'. The footnotes in the standard edition of the NJB are outrageously sceptical in places, which says more for the intellectual arrogance of the commentators than the integrity of God's word. According to these sceptics, the Magnificat and the Benedictus were not actually uttered by Mary and Zechariah but conveniently inserted into the narrative by Luke as appropriate pronouncements. The fact that the Bible deems the Benedictus as a prophecy seems to have escaped the commentator's attention. I think I will stick to the JB!


#8

I wouldn't classify CTS as another Bible since it** is** the Jerusalem Bible (excepting the Psalms). It has the same benefits of being a literary translation as the NJB.

You have already made up your mind, however. :shrug:


#9

[quote="sealabeag, post:4, topic:316543"]
I'm not really interested in other Bibles, I have the CTS bible amongst others. I'm just looking for info. on the supposed revision of the New Jerusalem Bible. Thanks for your input though :)

[/quote]

Here is a link to the revised NJB project that is called:** 'The Bible in its Traditions'**;
www.bibest.org


#10

I once thought I heard that a Third Edition of the New Jerusalem bible had been completed in French.

Does anyone know if it will be translated into English?

It would be a revision of the New Jerusalem bible.

I don't know what changes they would seek to make in the Third edition.

What I've always heard is that the New Jerusalem Bible is more literal and less dynamic than the Jerusalem bible but that it has much more inclusive language than the Jerusalem bible.

What would be great would be the New Jerusalem bible with all the inclusive language taken out with the New Grail Psalms and the use of the word "Lord" instead of the Jewish name for God in the Old Testament.

Too bad we couldn't have a translation like that--with "Hail Mary Full of grace" and in Isaiah 7:14--"A virgin will conceive".

It's obvious to me that it wouldn't take a lot to greatly improve MANY translations--a lot of the people who post here if they had a magic wand could solve what seems to be so wrong about many modern translations.

I think we would have better translations if the USCCB could make money off of any approved translation in the United States--then they wouldn't be always pushing the NAB.

But everyone pray that the next and hopefully Last attempt at revising the NAB will turn out right.


#11

[quote="SonCatcher, post:8, topic:316543"]
I wouldn't classify CTS as another Bible since it** is** the Jerusalem Bible (excepting the Psalms). It has the same benefits of being a literary translation as the NJB.

You have already made up your mind, however. :shrug:

[/quote]

It can't possibly be the exact same excepting the Psalms, as I was comparing them last night and the wording in the CTS Bible is different. Thanks anywho! :)


#12

Great!

Not so great…

Agreed, it really annoys me sometimes. The editors notes before many of the OT books refer to many things as fictional which I don’t agree with at all.

Anyway thanks so much for your help, I might try out the JB and see how I like it, and just wait and see if anything comes of a revised NJB! :slight_smile:


#13

I will be talking to the commissioning editor at Darton, Longman & Todd on Monday so I hope to get a definitive answer on the revision of the NJB - i.e. is it to be published or not?

The CTS Catholic Bible is a nice little edition, incorporating the JB and the Grail Psalms.

The down side to this edition is that some of the footnotes are unsound. For instance, doubt is cast on the miraculous prison escapes of Peter and Paul in the Acts of the Apostles. The events are described as comical and improbable. Once commentators start down this road, of doubting the veracity of selected passages in Holy Scripture, where does it end? Who are they to pick and choose? It's a great pity because this is a nicely-produced edition that matches the readings in the Mass liturgy, and there are some useful appendices.

I count myself lucky that I have the full edition of the JB (the American edition published by Doubleday) with all the notes. This has been out of print for about twenty years, having been superceded by the NJB. The JB has its faults but I find it to be the most inspiring translation of the Bible. For me the Word of God leaps up from the pages. Everyone has their own preference.


#14

I read the JB and occasionally reference the NJB. I had high hopes when I ordered the CTS bible. I got mine (standard size) and the print is so small, I can't read it for any period of time.


#15

I'm the same with my use of the JB. I sometimes refer to the NJB for an alternative rendering or clarification. The footnotes in the standard edition of the NJB are often more detailed but you need to exercise caution, for the reasons stated in one of my previous threads.

The compact edition of the CTS Bible has tiny print - too small in my opinion. The regular edition has the right print size but it's a bit feint, unlike the JB and NJB, where the print size is good, clear and black, even in the pocket edition of the NJB. In the end it all depends on the state of one's eyesight!


#16

CTS has recently published some new editions of their CTS Bible:
ctsbooks.org/scripture-2


#17

[quote="SonCatcher, post:8, topic:316543"]
I wouldn't classify CTS as another Bible since it** is** the Jerusalem Bible (excepting the Psalms). It has the same benefits of being a literary translation as the NJB.

You have already made up your mind, however. :shrug:

[/quote]

From the CTS website on the differences between their old and new editions"

What’s New in the New Catholic Bible **Alongside the Jerusalem and Grail translations authorised by the Vatican for use in the Liturgy:
[LIST]
*]New specially commissioned introductions, one for each book, giving the biblical and historical context
*]New specially commissioned liturgical introductions placing each book of the Bible in the Church’s liturgical year
*]New footnotes following the latest scholarship
*]New marginal references helping you get the most out of each passage.
*]New layout – using clear and modern fonts in easy-to-read single-column format
*]
New text alterations, replacing the word ‘Yahweh’ with ‘the LORD’ as requested by Benedict XVI for all new Bibles
**
*]New directories of references for readings used in the Mass and the Liturgy of the Hours, including the fuller two-year cycle for the Breviary.
[/LIST]

As to the NJB, it is a new translation of the original. The 1966 was a translation of the French Bible de Jerusalem. I wish the CTS Bible were available here in the US.


#18

After contacting DLT, I can confirm that there are no plans to revise the JB or NJB. The NJB is selling well in many English-speaking countries, and the Popular Edition of the JB is still in print.

The 'Bible in its Traditions' is an ongoing project conducted by the same source as the original Jerusalem Bible, the Ecole Biblique, but perhaps not an actual revision of the JB/NJB.


#19

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