new missal

So I got my own missal and figured out what Sunday it is and could not follow the mass. It was on EWTN. I thought it would be easier than I found it to be.:hmmm: But something went wrong because we weren’t matching up. I was using the St. Joseph that my mom sent me and I have obtained a Daily Roman Missal that should be here this week. I need to know what I’m doing when I get to the church. It’s embarrassing to be so ignorant. Any help is appreciated. am scouring the web now for a site or two. Hope everyone has had an awesome day.

I subscribed to the magnificat magazine for a year, it was really helpful. I still got lost during Eucharistic prayer, except at one parish where it was announced which one they were using. I attend a different, Eastern Catholic liturgy now which has an easier to follow service book.

us.magnificat.net/home/discover

Your best bet is to just go, and learn by doing. Nobody will care if you know what you’re doing or not…most likely nobody will even notice. If it makes you feel more comfortable, watch daily mass on EWTN or another Catholic channel, and you’all quickly figure out the basic structure and when to kneel, stand, or sit. And there’s only few different responses you give…which you’ll pick up easy enough.

For me, the only thing I do is read the reading before mass, and then just go with it. You’ll figure it out, don’t worry too much. Like I said, nobody will notice if you get a little lost, so nothing to be embarrassed about.

“Magnificat” and “Give is this Day” are both good subscription magazines that many people find simpler to use than the missal. Both contain the Order of the Mass, the readings, morning and evening prayers, and some spiritual reading…for every day of the month, not just Sundays.

The priests on EWTN like to say many of the Mass prayers in Latin. Was that the problem?

Some of the wording of the Mass was changed in many places about seven years ago. Was the Sunday missal you were using up-to-date?

Could you be more specific:

  1. Are you asking about Sundays or weekdays (or both)?

  2. What parts didn’t “match”? (readings, collect [opening prayer], Eucharistic Prayer, etc.)

The Sundays vs. Weekdays question matters because (for the most part) Sunday Masses will be the same from one location to another. In contrast, weekday Masses have many options as far as the calendar is concerned.

One thing I suggest to those who are new at this is to keep it simple. Ask your local parish for a wall calendar—instead of using online tables or guides. That will help you keep track of what Sunday or week is current.

WOW I am so blessed to have all this encouragement. I will look up the calendar, it was a Sunday missal but I think there’s a difference in Vatican ll and Roman missal accordance. I get mixed up a little flipping pages so I’ll book mark more and spend more prep time. Will definitely be looking unto the magazine and I have to say I’m liking all the readings in the missal. Even though it’s a bit foreign by the time I get back home again my folks are going to fall over when I can tell them why they genuflect! God bless you all for your help. Ilike the nun lady on EWTN. She’s like having a grandma again. There is something very special about the missal. Not like my Bible but I made a cover for it so I can read it on breaks at work and not mess it up. Don’t know what it is but I prize it.

That might be a different issue…

There are (basically, at least for our purposes today)* 2 English language versions of the Mass, because the translation changed in 2011. If the book itself was printed before 2011 it will have the outdated (and obsolete) translation.

The easiest way to tell is to look at the opening of the Mass. After the priest says “The Lord be with you”, if it says “And also with you” it’s an obsolete printing. If it says “And with your spirit” it’s current.


  • yes, I am intentionally ignoring such things as the “interim translation” because they have no bearing on the topic at hand.

I would suggest, if you are new to Catholic masses, to just use the missal that most parishes have in the pews. They are easy to use and to follow. Now, for weekday masses, they normally don’t have the readings. For that, use the iMissal app on your smart phone. It works, choose the current day from the calendar and it opens up on the readings. Now that I think about it, it will display the entire mass.

I appreciate all the input. I think I figured out how to keep track of the days. Downloaded an app and match it to the book. but there are some questions I am going to put up about abbreviations and symbols.

the V with a slash in it (priest?) The R?

pray for, turn to, “N.” (is that the name of someone or one of the Gospels?)

What is a proper of saints?

I pretty much have ordinary time down what is “solemnities”

What are prefaces?

How do you know what prayers the priest is going to read? There seem to be options.

I am fascinated and in love with this little book.

What is an antiphon?

What are solemn blessings? Votive masses?

Does anyone want to do google hangouts? we can set up a time and I’ll meet you with my missal! God bless!

the R\ means that the people respond the V\ is for the priest the N\ means praying for the U.S. , the pope ,Holy See etc. hopefully this helps😀

Hi learning2b! Here are some points that might help, have taken some of the things in quotes from various Catholic sites:

the V with a slash in it (priest?) The R?
These stand for “Versicle” (“a short sentence spoken or chanted by a priest”) and “Response” (what the people answer).

pray for, turn to, “N.” (is that the name of someone or one of the Gospels?)
Yes, it basically means “insert appropriate name here” because the names can change. Ex: “We pray for our bishop, N.” (In my diocese, our bishop just retired so we have gone from Paul to Michael).

What is a proper of saints?
The proper is “a part of the Christian liturgy that varies according to the date, either representing an observance within the liturgical year, or of a particular saint or significant event.” So if the Priest celebrating a particular saint that day at Mass, various prayers are changed to reflect that. Ex: February 21 is the feast day of Saint Peter Damian, so the Priest might use an opening prayer like this:
"Grant, we pray, almighty God, that we may so follow the teaching and example of the Bishop Saint Peter Damian, that, putting nothing before Christ and always ardent in the service of your Church, we may be led to the joys of eternal light. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen."

I pretty much have ordinary time down what is “solemnities”
The Church commemorates various important events throughout the liturgical year; solemnities denote the most important ones. Sundays and Holy Days of Obligation are solemnities. Some examples: Sacred Heart of Jesus, Saints Peter and Paul, Saint Joseph…Feast days are another “step down” on the scale, and then you have Memorials (which can be optional or obligatory).

What are prefaces?
The Preface is the prayers the Priest says before we all sing the “Holy, Holy, Holy.” It generally changes according to the season that we’re in (i.e., Advent, Lent, Easter, Ordinary Time, etc.). When the Priest says “Let us give thanks to the Lord our God” and we say “It is right and just,” he then continues with the Preface saying, "It is truly right and just…"

How do you know what prayers the priest is going to read? There seem to be options.
**Which prayers are you referring to? All of the opening and closing prayers change according to the day. As for the Eucharistic Prayer, the priest can generally choose which one he will use, although there are guidelines:
Eucharistic Prayer 1 (or “Roman Canon”), appropriate on major feasts/saint’s days
Eucharistic Prayer 2, shortest, often used in daily Masses
Eucharistic Prayer 3, preferred on Sundays
Eucharistic Prayer 4, longer, "gives a fuller summary of salvation history.” **

I am fascinated and in love with this little book.
:thumbsup:

What is an antiphon?
**An antiphon is “one or more psalm verses or sentences from Holy Scripture,” that can be sung or merely recited. For example, if you are attending Mass on a weekday, the people might recite the Communion Antiphon before going up to take Communion (as opposed to a Sunday Mass when you generally have a choir/cantor singing a hymn).
**

What are solemn blessings? Votive masses?
**A solemn blessing might be said by the Priest at the conclusion of a Mass on a special occasion. It’s done right before we are dismissed. The Priest will say “The Lord be with you” and we say “And with your spirit.” Then the priest says “Bow your head and pray for God’s blessing.” The solemn blessing is then given in three parts, with the people saying “Amen” after each. Ex:
Easter Sunday Solemn Blessing
Priest: May almighty God bless you on this solemn feast of Easter, and may he protect you against all sin.
People: Amen.
Priest: Through the resurrection of his Son, God has granted us healing. May he fulfill his promises, and bless you with eternal life.
People: Amen.
Priest: You have mourned for Christ’s sufferings; now you celebrate the joy of his resurrection. May you come with joy to the feast which lasts for ever.
People: Amen.
Priest: May almighty God bless you, the Father, and the Son, and the Holy Spirit.
People: Amen.

A Votive Mass is a Mass celebrated “in honor of some mystery of the faith, or the Blessed Virgin, or of a saint or all the saints, but not in the liturgical calendar for that day.”**

Perhaps others can jump in where I might have misspoke or not have been clear?

Thanks Colleen!

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