New Morality Clause Ends One Teacher's Career at Fatima school in Louisiana

A gay art teacher at Our Lady of Fatima School in Louisiana, when confronted with the new morality clause in his contract, which specifically bars teachers from homosexual activity, says he will not sign, and he put out a written statement about his refusal and the end of his job there. The Diocese of Lafayette in Louisiana, USA, just added this clause in the contracts for all the teachers in its Catholic schools. It is not known how many, or if, other teachers would not sign. This teacher says he doesn’t agree with the new clause, but accepts the position of the Diocese.
see www.katc.com/news/new-morality-clause-ends-one-teacher-s-career-at-fatima/

Fortunately, this is not the end of the teacher’s career.

It is very difficult to try to lead our children with a “do as I say, not as I do” practice, and if we are trying to instill Catholic moral values in them in our schools, it only makes sense that we try to set the best examples. At least as far and best as we know and can.

Having an active homosexual as teacher makes for tricky situations. If he/she is open about his/her lifestyle, what would he/she do when the issue of Catholic moral values arises? What about school functions when usually teachers and parents are accompanied by their spouses or dates?

That clause makes sense.

First of all the he is a she, and she did not sign because as a matter of conscience she could not. For that I commend the teacher. I recommend that anyone following this thread read the article contained at the link posted by mdgspencer.

From the article comes this quote:

“I would hate to think we would ever not renew the contract of a teacher who is an outstanding teacher because of something to do with her personal life,” Russo said.

Jaci Russo is the president of Our Lady of Fatima Advisory Council – the equivalent of a school board.

Fair enough Ms Russo. Now, what if an outstanding teacher has felony convictions, or is a pedophile, or views child porn in the privacy of their own home, or uses crack cocaine, or smokes marijuana in the privacy of their own home during weekend parties, etc.? What does the school board do in those cases?

I think y’all get the point.

My child had a teacher in 3rd grade who was not even Catholic at a Catholic school! So I thought, hum . . .maybe my kid made a mistake . . . but sure enough, the teacher told the children that she “use to be Lutheran and then became Methodist.” My kid asked, “So when did you become Catholic?” The teacher said they were “basically the same” and my daughter said, “Oh no they are not! Why do you think we come to a Catholic school instead of a Methodist school?” She got sent to the principal and I was called. Of course, I took the side of my child. Non-Catholics should not be teaching religion in Catholic schools and that includes members of other faith traditions as well as those who show by their lifestyle that they are not living in accord with the Faith.

The problem is that most active homosexuals do not want to go about their lifestyle in the privacy of their bedrooms/homes. It is more often than not an “in your face” attitude.

If a teacher was non repentant of his/her public known addiction (drugs, porn, alcohol, gambling) or was non-chalant about his/her two spouses or crminal record, I am sure similar measures would take place.

There is no such thing as private sin.

Non-Catholics should not be teaching religion in Catholic schools and that includes members of other faith traditions as well as those who show by their lifestyle that they are not living in accord with the Faith.

I agree. We need consistency!

However, activities such as being a pedophile, viewing child porn, or using crack cocaine may pose a danger to the children she is teaching, whereas same-sex relations with an adult most likely would not unless she talks about her sex life in class.

Not true. You can use that rationalization for every other thing you mention: “as long as she is not high/smoking crack in front of the children… As long as she os not looking at porn in front of the children…” Please note that I am not comparing these things to one another but using your rationalization to justify them.

I disagree because even if she is watching child porn or smoking crack only at home, she is still coming to school with a mindset bent on having sex with or being stimulated by children and perhaps physically and emotionally high as well, or at least with a somewhat different brain chemistry. In the case of having sex at home, that behavior can stay at home unless, as I said, she is teaching her students about the joy of homosexuality, advocating for it, or talking to them about her personal sex life.

So, you would only ask her to leave her “homosexual mindset” at home? I would be very curious as to how many active homosexuals would not be offended (and even outraged) by this…

Living a homosexual lifestyle does not advocate for the moral values that we want to instill in our children in our Catholic schools.

Yes, it used to be commonly understood certain moral turpitudes exuded one from many positions especially ones that involved children.

What is meant by a homosexual mindset? Is there a divorced mindset as well, and should divorced people also be fired? The point I’m making is that she is not necessarily instilling homosexual moral values in her students so long as she does not discuss the topic of homosexuality with them and advocate in favor of it. But if she is a drug addict or obsessed with child porn, those kinds of behavior are likely affecting her interactions with her students. BTW, I do not oppose the policy of the school, whether or not it is internally consistent, since this is a private Catholic institution and therefore can set whatever moral guidelines it wishes within reason.

In the case of homosexuality only because it was once–and still is, by some–wrongly believed that homosexuals molest children.

While I am certainly not glad about anyone losing their job, particularly with the economy being in the shape that it is, I am glad to see more diocese taking these steps. Parents, particularly with the amount money it costs, have the right to expect an authentically Catholic environment for their children at Catholic schools. And while I don’t believe it is reasonable to expect all of the teachers to be saints (we are all sinners after all), Catholic schools should not be in the habit of employing those who are in open dissent from Church teaching on Faith and Morals.

New morality clause ends teacher’s job at Catholic school
katc.com/news/new-morality-clause-ends-one-teacher-s-career-at-fatima/

Catholic church removes ‘married’ gay man as confirmation teacher, lector
lifesitenews.com/news/catholic-church-removes-39married39-gay-man-as-confirmation-teacher-lector?utm_source=LifeSiteNews.com+Daily+Newsletter&utm_campaign=5313462b23-LifeSiteNews_com_US_Headlines_04_04_2013&utm_medium=email

I greatly empathize with these two teachers who will no longer be serving in positions of leadership, one at a Catholic school, and one at a Catholic parish. Due to media coverage, they have lost their privacy. Thousands of their fellow Americans know about their rejection of at least some part of Catholic doctrine and about their sexual orientation and lifestyles (not that we will remember their names though).

That being said, it is absolutely essential that they be not be allowed to serve in any leadership position in the Catholic Church. I wish more bishops, pastors and Catholic school administrators would have the will to do what is right by requiring that teachers and other Catholic leaders understand, accept, teach, and live by example the faith and morals as established through the ages by the Magisterium of the Catholic Church.

No matter how outstanding their skills are, or how well-liked they are, teachers should not be entitled to serve as any kind of leader or role model, if they cannot accept the teachings of the Church. Their positions are not for them; the positions exist primarily to help bring souls to heaven; the subject matter (art, English, etc.) is secondary. Even for an art teacher at a Catholic school, the mission of the Church far outweighs the importance of teaching art. Far too many Catholics who have attended Catholic schools have been poorly indoctrinated in the faith because they have become confused, disillusioned, or influenced by the false or distorted teachings they have received, and/or by the poor modeling of the faith. The subtle message they have received loud and clear is that Truth as claimed by the Catholic Church does not really matter all that much.

Religious education teachers, youth leaders, liturgical ministers and other parish leaders, cause HARM to the Church when they cohabitate, when they teach that contraception and abortion are okay, when they are actively homosexual, when they disagree about male-only ordination, when they say Catholics missing Sunday Mass is not a sin, and so forth. Pastors, school administrators and bishops who allow this are in effect condoning this, whether they consciously intend to condone it or not.

I think many of us Catholics are weary of pleading with our pastors, Catholic school administrators and bishops to require teachers and other leaders to pass on what is true by word and by example. They are either afraid to “offend” people, or they are in denial about the harmful effects of heterodoxy within the Church leadership, especially to the souls of our youth.

Perhaps U.S. Catholics can beg the leaders within the U.S. bishops’ conference to exhort their fellow bishops to take this issue more seriously, and to use the authority of their positions to protect the faith? Maybe hearing from dozens, or hundreds, of us concerned Catholics might help to sway them. Here is the contact information for Cardinal Dolan (President, USCCB), Bishop Rhoades (Chairman, USCCB Committee on Laity, Marriage, Family Life and Youth), and Archbishop Cordileone (Chairman, USCCB Subcommittee for the Promotion and Defense of Marriage).

His Excellency Cardinal Timothy Michael Dolan
President, U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB)
Archbishop, Archdiocese of New York
1011 First Ave., New York, NY 10022-4134
Telephone: 212-371-1000
Fax: 212-826-6020; 212-826-8379
Email: archbishop.dolan@archny.org

Most Reverend Kevin C. Rhoades
Chairman, USCCB Committee on Laity, Marriage, Family Life and Youth
Bishop, Diocese of Ft. Wayne-South Bend
915 South Clinton
P.O. Box 390
Fort Wayne, Indiana 46801
Phone: 260-422-4611
Fax: 260-969-9145
USCCB Email: Contact staff at laity@usccb.org or 202-541-3040

Most Reverend Salvatore Cordileone
Chairman, USCCB Subcommittee for the Promotion and Defense of Marriage
Archbishop, Archdiocese of San Francisco
One Peter Yorke Way
San Francisco 94109
Phone: 415-614-5500
Fax 415-614-5601
info@sfarchdiocese.org
USCCB Email: Contact staff at defenseofmarriage@usccb.org or 202-541-3413

I would tend to agree. Religion is a deep and tricky subject that at a 3rd grade level will usually demand the teacher sharing some of his personal understanding of various topics. So while college students should be able to handle a non-Catholic occasionally explaining his own understanding while teaching a a religious subject, it’s probably a bad idea for younger students.

Having said that, I see no problem having non-Catholics teach non-religious classes. They simply must refrain from editorial remarks such as your daughter’s teacher made.

from Digitonomy:

I would tend to agree. Religion is a deep and tricky subject that at a 3rd grade level will usually demand the teacher sharing some of his personal understanding of various topics. So while college students should be able to handle a non-Catholic occasionally explaining his own understanding while teaching a a religious subject, it’s probably a bad idea for younger students.

Having said that, I see no problem having non-Catholics teach non-religious classes. They simply must refrain from editorial remarks such as your daughter’s teacher made.

Digitonomy, religion should be simple, and not be deep and tricky, for Catholic students in a Catholic school or parish religious education program.

Third grader in grocery store with mother: “Mom, there’s Mrs. B, my English teacher! I love her. She’s nice to us. See that lady, who’s holding her hands? They just got married! Mom, Mr. Jones told us in religion class that a woman has to marry a man. Why did Mrs. B get married to a lady?”

Catholic students deserve to WITNESS the faith being LIVED by their teachers.

I only used the word “mindset” because it was in your own previous post.

We all have our ideas and attitudes regarding homosexuality, divorce, drugs, etc. Especially if we are involved in them (or have been somehow affected by them).

I have close friends and family relatives who are active homosexuals. I have learned two things:

  1. That they deserve a compassion I had no clue about (not pity, true compassion) and they strive to loved, respected and accepted. Which they absolutely have a right to.

  2. That the homosexual behavior, at least when they first “come out” does seem to engulf their minds. It blinds them. And most of the ones I know would be at least a bit taken aback if told to come and teach but leave your homosexuality at home. The implication (and the reality) is that there is something wrong with it and they should not talk about it. I have yet to meet an active homosexual who is ok with being told that homosexuality is wrong or should be kept “in the closet”.

Having an active homosexual as a teacher in a Catholic school is a true conflict waiting to happen even is she would agree to not say anything “pro-gay” in the classroom.

Absolutely!

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