New Video Game Teaches Our Kids to Kill Police Officers


#1

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								An ultra-violent video game known as *25 to Life* has been released by the video giant Eidos.  **In this game, marketed to our children, players can assume the role of a gang member who is encouraged to execute drive-by shootings of police officers and to use civilians as human shields.**

Eidos considers this new game entertainment. To celebrate the killing of police officers as entertainment is a sick concept. No matter, Eidos is making money.

Take Action

One of the major outlets selling 25 to Life is Best Buy. Send an email to Best Buy asking them to discontinue carrying 25 to Life.

When you send your email to Best Buy, you will automatically be added to a list of participants thanking police officers for being willing to lay their lives on the line every day to protect us. We will present the petitions to the National Association for Police Officers headquartered in Washington.

Finally, take one further step. It is a little extra work, but it is small in return for what our police officers do for us. If you buy or rent videos, please call your video store and ask them if they have the game 25 to Life in stock. If they say yes, politely tell them you will not be renting videos from them in the future. If they say no, thank them for not stocking 25 to Life.

							  									** 										 											[[/font]]("http://www.onemilliondads.com/TakeAction.asp?id=250")** 										 									

							
							 									 										[font=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif][size=2] 											**NOTE:** If you see a commercial or	program which is offensive, [**email us the information**]("http://onemilliondads.com/ComplaintForm.asp"). 											Many of you have done this, and it is very helpful. 										[/size][/font]

#2

I wouldn’t recommend boycotting any store just for selling something you don’t agree with. Not everyone shares your (our) views on life. If someone wants to play that video game, it’s well within their rights. If someone lets their children play that game, then that’s their problem. They wouldn’t be good parents regardless of what video games are available.

Personally, I like a lot of things that I would never allow my children to take part in. When they get old enough, it’ll be their decision, and I have to hope that I gave them the guidence to understand right from wrong and make the right decisions.

History has shown over and over again that removing something that might have a negative effect on some people does not stop negative behavior.

Best Buy sells a lot of things that are not bad. Actually, material things cannot really be bad, it’s people that are bad.


#3

My kids love video games where they get to blow things up.

The oldest boy, a staunch, practicing Catholic, 19 years old, going to engineering school full time, graduated with many honors from Catholic high school and still hangs around the valedictorian of his class from two years ago, and working two jobs.

He wants to come home to a video game and blow some stuff up after all. It doesn’t teach him to blow things up. It may help release him of the desire to blow up actual people and buildings, though.

There is a new one coming that he pointed out to me that he will probably want to get. This way he gets to destroy things, and it’s based on a Protestant heresy so that makes it even more fun, as the player battles with the forces of the antichrist.

Video game lovers, here is a link to more information:

Left Behind: Eternal Forces

An excerpt from the article:

Newsweek

March 6, 2006 issue - Praise the Lord and pass the ammunition: Christians are finally getting a high-caliber shoot-'em-up videogame of their own. Due out on PCs in the second half of 2006, Left Behind: Eternal Forces is the first game adapted from the blockbuster books by Tim LaHaye and Jerry Jenkins. Gamers familiar with the largely uninspiring and unprofitable history of Christian videogames will quickly notice two differences in Forces: the top-shelf design, which offers an eerily authentic reproduction of the game’s Manhattan setting, and a level of violence reminiscent of Grand Theft Auto. The game revolves around New Yorkers who are “left behind” after the rapture. Players scour the streets for converts, training them into a work force to feed, shelter and join a paramilitary resistance against the growing forces of the Antichrist.

Alan


#4

No offense Buffalo, but if you look at the side of the box, theirs a rating on it. These ratings were put there so that parents would see what was in the video game and actively decide whether or not to let their children play them. Sure its violent, but its the parents responsibility. If they want to allow their children to play it, that’s their choice. You may not agree, but they have the right to do so.

Also, my husband has been playing “violent” video games for years, I see no psychological problems that have arisen from it. He puts it this way “what would you rather me do? Get mad and punch every dumb customer that comes in, or keep it in, and do some destruction to characters in a computer game? They both work equally and the same, but one is real and one is not”.


#5

[quote=sarcophagus]No offense Buffalo, but if you look at the side of the box, theirs a rating on it. These ratings were put there so that parents would see what was in the video game and actively decide whether or not to let their children play them. Sure its violent, but its the parents responsibility. If they want to allow their children to play it, that’s their choice. You may not agree, but they have the right to do so.

Also, my husband has been playing “violent” video games for years, I see no psychological problems that have arisen from it. He puts it this way “what would you rather me do? Get mad and punch every dumb customer that comes in, or keep it in, and do some destruction to characters in a computer game? They both work equally and the same, but one is real and one is not”.
[/quote]

There are better games and uses of time that serve us better.

Sorry about your husband. Maybe a punching bag in the basement would help. :smiley:


#6

[quote=AlanFromWichita]My kids love video games where they get to blow things up.

The oldest boy, a staunch, practicing Catholic, 19 years old, going to engineering school full time, graduated with many honors from Catholic high school and still hangs around the valedictorian of his class from two years ago, and working two jobs.

He wants to come home to a video game and blow some stuff up after all. It doesn’t teach him to blow things up. It may help release him of the desire to blow up actual people and buildings, though.

There is a new one coming that he pointed out to me that he will probably want to get. This way he gets to destroy things, and it’s based on a Protestant heresy so that makes it even more fun, as the player battles with the forces of the antichrist.

Video game lovers, here is a link to more information:

Left Behind: Eternal Forces

An excerpt from the article:

Alan
[/quote]

Awesome, I’m going to check out this game as well.


#7

One game I love to play is Age of Empires II. I often play the Spaniards and battle the Mayans and Incas. First, I send in a horde of missionaries to convert who I can. Then, I send in the conquistadors to finish off the rest. Loads of fun :smiley: I also like playing the Byzantines or some other European power and wiping out the Turks.

I think it would be cool if they made an Inquisition game, where you have to hunt down heretics, interrogate them, and turn them over to the state for execution. I see these as good tools for teachings kids history.


#8

I find the game Grand Theft Auto enjoyable and that game promotes the killing of police officers as well.


#9

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