New wipers for auto safety


#1

My worn out auto windshield wipers were unable to clear snow and ice from my windshield, resulting in very poor visibility in today’s Minnesota snowstorm.

The kindly man at the auto parts store put on new wiper blades for me. It made a world of difference in my view of the eoad.

For safety’s sake, if you are in the snow and ice belt, make sure you have well functioning windshield wipers. It could help you avoid an accident.


#2

This is good advice for all of us (even those, like me, who don't live in icy/snowy areas) ... because even rain can be a hazard if you can't see well enough! :sad_yes:

I was told that the best policy is to change blades every year, early in the fall, before the snow starts (or before the rainy season starts here in CA).

Thanks for reminding us, MM :)


#3

Smart move. I'd also like to add this plea to other motorists especially in the snowy areas of the country: Before pulling out, while your car is warming up, take the time and care to remove ice and snow from ALL your windows, mirrors, and lights as well as the top of the car, the hood, and the lid of the trunk. It's also a good idea to pull those wipers up and remove the accumulation of ice and snow underneath them. Doing this will also make those wipers last longer and wipe cleaner!

So often, I see cars with a small patch cleared on the windshield in front of the driver and snow-laden side windows, side view mirrors, and back windows, not to mention the snow drifts on hoods and trunk lids obscuring their vision. Not removing the accumulation from your tail lights and back window makes it difficult or impossible for a following driver to see whether you've applied the brakes as well! Now, wouldn't one feel really stupid if one got rear-ended because they did not take the time and care to just take the snow mountain off their car?

Maybe the one foot by two feet windshield clearance works for army tanks, but a tank driver actually has a periscope which allows him to see 360 degrees. That kind of patch to look out of in a car just doesn't work!

Also, having just survived the great Thruway jam up (I was stuck on the NYS Thruway near Buffalo, NY for eighteen hours this past Wednesday night) make sure that you have the following items in your car's trunk: A shovel, a blanket, gloves, a warm hat, some salt or sand, road flares, fresh drinking water, and some convenient nonperishable food (energy bars or those foil-packed tuna packages work well.) If you are stuck and are running low on gas, turn the car on for ten minutes or so each hour to warm it up. And make sure that you clear snow accumulation away from the exhaust pipe!

Thanks for the winter driving safety reminder!


#4

Absolutely! Keep the reservoir filled with wiper fluid, too. It goes fast when there’s a muddy film to clear all the time. The other thing is to clean your windshield and other windows inside and out. Glare from a low sun on a dirty window can blind you as much if the windows were totally fogged over.

If you’ve been travelling on a slushy road, it also helps to clean the headlights and tail lights when you finally take a pit stop. They can get so dirty that the headlights illuminate far less and all of the lights are far less visible to other drivers.


#5

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