New York Schools should observe Mueslim Holidays

religion.blogs.cnn.com/2010/07/01/my-take-new-yorks-schools-should-observe-muslim-holidays/

So, we celebrate Kwanzaa. A holiday INVENTED by a felon black supremacist from Malcom X's camp.

((side note: Could you imagine kids being forced to acknowledge, celebrate, and make little trinkets at school for a KKK holiday?? :rolleyes:))

And yes, we get Christmas off, but its not CHRISTMAS, its 'Winter Break', and its all about Santa....

Why do we get the short end of the stick???? Dude I am SOOOO pushing back on all this stuff man I am just DONE with the PC...

First off ALL holidays are invented. Second, The schools are not closed for Kwanza, it just happens to take place during the Christmas or Midwinter break (whatever you want to call it) and Third Mayor Michael Bloomberg has decided that the holidays won’t be added to the public school calendar.

Oh well thank you for letting me know this situation has already been addressed by Bloomberg, however this article was written the day after, and this group is still pressing the issue, so I’m not so convinced its over and done with.

And no, they **dont **take a day off for Kwanzaa, but they do sit there, learn about it, and make little crafts and art stuff. (Like I had said).

And, like I mentioned, it is offensive to me, as a white woman, for my kid to learn this garbage. If it was TRULY some african holiday, then fine, but if black kids had to make paper mache’ white candled ornaments of some sort for some KKK holiday made up by the Klan leader, well I’m sure then the african american community would understand my disdain.

Thanks for the exercise in using the ‘bold’ feature. :rolleyes:

Actually, I was looking on the NYC Public School Calendar, found here:

http://schools.nyc.gov/Common/Templates/MainTemplate/CommonMainTemplate.aspx?NRMODE=Published&NRNODEGUID={A3B56BCE-D6E5-44F7-8ACA-A7C1918AFF69}&NRORIGINALURL=%2FCalendar%2Fdefault.htm&NRCACHEHINT=Guest

It does state that Sept 13th Rosh Hashanah (schools closed),However when one moves to Dec it states it like this: Winter Recess (including Christmas and New Year’s Day) (schools closed -students return to school on Monday, January 3, 2011)

Moving on to Feb: *Midwinter Recess (including Washington’s Birthday) (schools closed) *

Now on to April: Spring Recess (including Good Friday, Easter and Passover) (schools closed-Students return to school on Wednesday, April 27).

Nothing objectionable found.

[quote="Kuan_Yin, post:4, topic:203963"]

Nothing objectionable found.

[/quote]

Yet. I think your missing my point. And I know for a FACT the kids celebrate Kwanzaa because last year my daughter came home with a candle thingy and all kinds of Kwanzaa stuff. :shrug:

And my friends kids, go to this integrated school downtown, where they have all the grades together, one big ol' school, they teach homosexual stuff..and yes, even Islam. I was SO mad, when she dropped them off to me to babysit, and I was helping her middle son with his homework, and they were learning about this period of Islam, where they abstain from eating during the day, abstain from all kinds of stuff, it was a page all about how Islam is about suppressing yourself from --

I dont know but it certainly had spin to it and what peeved me was every 4th line there was at least 5 words blacked out with permanent marker. Like the teacher had some paper printed, censored it, and then copied it, and distributed it to the kids.

Why would they have to black out so much stuff?? Look, if its so inappropriate you gotta go to lengths to make it look kosher, dont teach it to my frekn kid.

Char is on to something. There is a strong anti-Christian bias in all public schools. Why are they called “Winter Recess” instead of Christmas recess, like it used to be called for hundreds of years? Because schools are PC.

Even though Kwanza's principals are aimed at Black children
I can't see the harm if every race and creed were at least mindful of them, they could be universal concepts.
Here is the list:
Umoja (Unity): To strive for and to maintain unity in the family, community, nation, and race.
Kujichagulia (Self-Determination): To define ourselves, name ourselves, create for ourselves, and speak for ourselves.
Ujima (Collective Work and Responsibility): To build and maintain our community together and make our brothers' and sisters' problems our problems, and to solve them together.
Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics): To build and maintain our own stores, shops, and other businesses and to profit from them together.
Nia (Purpose): To make our collective vocation the building and developing of our community in order to restore our people to their traditional greatness.
Kuumba (Creativity): To do always as much as we can, in the way we can, in order to leave our community more beautiful and beneficial than we inherited it.
Imani (Faith): To believe with all our heart in our people, our parents, our teachers, our leaders, and the righteousness and victory of our struggle.

I found it here:en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kwanzaa and here: officialkwanzaawebsite.org/index.shtml

I'm a white woman too, for the record.:)

Of the 5 religious holidays mentioned in the NYC school calendar 2 are Jewish and 3 are Christian. I don’t see the bias.

In terms of Public Schools they should be neither " pro" or “anti” any religion, as Public Institutions they must remain neutral to all faiths.

It’s called winter break because more than just Christmas happens to fall during that time period.

And as a public school teacher I have noticed an Anti-Christian bias even here in Texas. The bias is strong among a small amount of the educational community.

Is Kwanzaa an African thing? I thought it was a black American thing.

[quote="Rascalking, post:7, topic:203963"]
Why are they called "Winter Recess" instead of Christmas recess, like it used to be called for hundreds of years? Because schools are PC.

[/quote]

Actually not quite true. In early America Christmas was banned outright, that is why Thanksgiving came into being. Congress was is session on Dec 25th and there was little no no mention of it in the public sphere till much later. Also it was another issue that divided Americans before the civil war, Many Northerners saw sin in the celebration of Christmas; to these people the celebration of Thanksgiving was more appropriate.

Here is a very interesting link to the History Of Christmas in America.
thehistoryofchristmas.com/ch/in_america.htm

[quote="Kuan_Yin, post:11, topic:203963"]
Actually not quite true. In early America Christmas was banned outright, that is why Thanksgiving came into being. Congress was is session on Dec 25th and there was little no no mention of it in the public sphere till much later. Also it was another issue that divided Americans before the civil war, Many Northerners saw sin in the celebration of Christmas; to these people the celebration of Thanksgiving was more appropriate.

Here is a very interesting link to the History Of Christmas in America.
thehistoryofchristmas.com/ch/in_america.htm

[/quote]

-Sigh-

Being from the "north" I'm fairly certain it was called Christmas break for a long period of time.

It's pretty clear to anyone not biased that there is a war against Christianity-Judaism and in favor of secularism.

And even if I'm wrong, many, many people are on my side.

[quote="Kuan_Yin, post:11, topic:203963"]
Actually not quite true. In early America Christmas was banned outright, that is why Thanksgiving came into being. Congress was is session on Dec 25th and there was little no no mention of it in the public sphere till much later. Also it was another issue that divided Americans before the civil war, Many Northerners saw sin in the celebration of Christmas; to these people the celebration of Thanksgiving was more appropriate.

Here is a very interesting link to the History Of Christmas in America.
thehistoryofchristmas.com/ch/in_america.htm

[/quote]

When did America ban Christmas? Puritanical England banned it, but not early America.

Please look here:
wnd.com/?pageId=81144

Its from World Net Daily a very conservative (Pro Tea Party) website

[quote="Kuan_Yin, post:14, topic:203963"]
Please look here:
wnd.com/?pageId=81144

Its from World Net Daily a very conservative (Pro Tea Party) website

[/quote]

You are right. According to wikipedia, certain cities in America, notably Boston, banned the observation of Christmas.

"Celebration was outlawed in Boston from 1659 to 1681. The ban by the Pilgrims was revoked in 1681 by English governor Sir Edmund Andros, however it wasn't until the mid 1800's that celebrating Christmas became fashionable in the Boston region.[86] At the same time, Christian residents of Virginia and New York observed the holiday freely. Pennsylvania German Settlers, pre-eminently the Moravian settlers of Bethlehem, Nazareth and Lititz in Pennsylvania and the Wachovia Settlements in North Carolina, were enthusiastic celebrators of Christmas. The Moravians in Bethlehem had the first Christmas trees in America as well as the first Nativity Scenes.[87] Christmas fell out of favor in the United States after the American Revolution, when it was considered an English custom.[88] George Washington attacked Hessian (German) mercenaries on Christmas during the Battle of Trenton in 1777, Christmas being much more popular in Germany than in America at this time."

All children (Christian or not) get time off–usually 2 to 3 weeks–at Christmas. All children (Christian or not) get Good Friday off.

When was the last time public schools closed for Chaunukkah? Eid? Holi?

You can call it “winter break” or whatever you want, but anyone school age and over knows that the fortuitous timing of this school holiday coincides with CHRISTMAS. In fact, Christian holidays are the only religious holidays for which children receive time off from school (unless the holiday of another faith just so happens to coincide). So yes, there’s definitely a bias, but not an anti-Christian one.

I can’t decide whether to laugh or cry at people who fuss and moan about bringing religion back into the schools, while conveniently forgetting that Christianity isn’t the only religion–until it comes back and bites them in the butt. :wink:

Miz

[quote="Kuan_Yin, post:8, topic:203963"]
Even though Kwanza's principals are aimed at Black children
I can't see the harm if every race and creed were at least mindful of them, they could be universal concepts.
Here is the list:
Umoja (Unity): To strive for and to maintain unity in the family, community, nation, and race.
Kujichagulia (Self-Determination): To define ourselves, name ourselves, create for ourselves, and speak for ourselves.
Ujima (Collective Work and Responsibility): To build and maintain our community together and make our brothers' and sisters' problems our problems, and to solve them together.
Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics): To build and maintain our own stores, shops, and other businesses and to profit from them together.
Nia (Purpose): To make our collective vocation the building and developing of our community in order to restore our people to their traditional greatness.
Kuumba (Creativity): To do always as much as we can, in the way we can, in order to leave our community more beautiful and beneficial than we inherited it.
Imani (Faith): To believe with all our heart in our people, our parents, our teachers, our leaders, and the righteousness and victory of our struggle.

I found it here:en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kwanzaa and here: officialkwanzaawebsite.org/index.shtml

I'm a white woman too, for the record.:)

[/quote]

I agree, those are all fine and dandy univeral concepts, but honestly, again, if the leader of the KKK had some holiday that promoted feeding and clothing the poor (or insert whichever universal concept here) black people would have a FIT having to observe it, just sayin'...

[quote="Miserys_Fence, post:16, topic:203963"]

I can't decide whether to laugh or cry at people who fuss and moan about bringing religion back into the schools, while conveniently forgetting that Christianity isn't the only religion--until it comes back and bites them in the butt. ;)

Miz

[/quote]

Was that part directed at me? You are so not my Valentine anymore.

For the record, I never said religion should be public schools.

[quote="Kuan_Yin, post:9, topic:203963"]
Of the 5 religious holidays mentioned in the NYC school calendar 2 are Jewish and 3 are Christian.** I don't see the bias. **

In terms of Public Schools they should be neither " pro" or "anti" any religion, as Public Institutions they must remain neutral to all faiths.

[/quote]

Dear, when its Kwanzaa, they learn exactly what the author of the holiday intended it to me meant as. They make little candle thingys, trees...I dont know Kwanzaa stuff.

On 'Jewish' Holidays, again, they learn what it means, make draedels...eat backlava...jk

On Christmas, its 'Winter Break', (they just happened to mention in that one particular school in parenthesis that this 'includes' Christmas), its not 'Christmas Vacation' like it used to be, and when they observe this holiday, its all about SANTA CLAUS??? There is not ONE mention of Jesus Christ, and thats the WHOLE POINT of Christmas!

[quote="agbasinger, post:15, topic:203963"]
You are right. According to wikipedia, certain cities in America, notably Boston, banned the observation of Christmas.

[/quote]

It will be interesting to contemplate while eating our Turkey in November, that origin of The Thanksgiving Holiday (which was established in New England) was meant as a replacement of Christmas because the early Americans up there believed that Christmas was sinful.

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