Newborn died in hospital while co-sleeping with mom


#1

I co-slept with both my babies in the hospital until 4 months old. Knowing they were beside me, I would wake up to every little noise or movement. This mother must have been a very deep sleeper.

Prayers to this mother and her family.

winnipegfreepress.com/local/newborns-death-highlights-danger-of-sharing-bed-125399253.html


#2

Oye, now that's really sad. :signofcross:


#3

I did sleep with all my babies b/c I nursed and it was so much easier. While I was in the hospital, I didn’t because I knew I was exhausted. It is possible the mother was taking a pain killer that made her extra tired.
Very sad story, but I think overall, cosleeping was great for me and I would recommend it in most circumstances. If the parents take meds that make them drowsy or they are drinking alcohol, cosleeping is not a good idea. Also, very obese parents probably shouldn’t either.


#4

[quote="Serap, post:1, topic:247937"]
I co-slept with both my babies in the hospital until 4 months old. Knowing they were beside me, I would wake up to every little noise or movement. This mother must have been a very deep sleeper.

Prayers to this mother and her family.

winnipegfreepress.com/local/newborns-death-highlights-danger-of-sharing-bed-125399253.html

[/quote]

That's a complete nightmare! I'm definetly a bassinet person! I can't think of anything worse than losing a brand new baby that way!


#5

Brass said the nurse told them “No, you guys are OK. You just go to sleep.”

Well that sounds like a lawsuit if I ever heard one.

What a horrible story. I am shocked that a hospital would allow co-sleeping for this very reason. What a person does in their own home they are responsible for, but what happens in the hospital is the hospital’s responsibility while you are under their care.

So sad, and so unnecessary.

~Liza


#6

Prayers for Cambria’s parents :gopray2:

I am a huge fan of co-sleeping (even in the hospital) and am trying to figure out how this scenario is possible. Must have been some heavy duty medication or some other external factor.


#7

Those were my thoughts too. Cosleeping is such a beneficial arrangement, even in the hospital, if the right safety procedures are followed (I did not bedshare in the hospital due to the attitudes of the medical staff there. I had planned on giving birth in a freestanding birth center but during labor I had to transfer to the hospital for medical necessity. If I had given birth in the birth center, my husband, our son, and I all would have slept in one bed following delivery - this was the normal procedure there.) I love bedsharing with my son even though the summer makes so much snuggling a little too warm. It’s too bad that this will, in all likelihood, be used as an argument against ALL bedsharing.

What a tragic accident. I will pray for the mother, child, and all others affected. :signofcross:


#8

When we had our DD 2 years ago we were NOT allowed to sleep in the bed with her. I was aloud to take a nap with her on my chest sitting in that crummy chair for the dads. :)


#9

It could have been positioning too. I ticked off my SIL one night when I told him to reposition our grandson. The kid was only two weeks old and he had him sitting straight up on his lap. They thought the noise he made breathing was 'cute'. In fact he was struggling to breathe in that position. Sometimes first time parents who have never looked after an infant are clueless.


#10

Co-sleeping is very dangerous. I work part-time in a pediatric hospital. If we have a patient under six months of age and the parent insists on co-sleeping, they have to sign a release form and that form has to be witnessed. I understand the flexiblity it offers, especially with nursing, but it's a dangerous habit. An infant suffocating from co-sleeping with a parent happens a lot more than newspapers report.


#11

IS cosleeping “very” dangerous? No.
CAN cosleeping be “very” dangerous? Yes.

The vast majority of infants who die in adult beds die from negligence, such as infants placed alone in an adult bed, infants napping in adult beds, rolling and getting entrapped between headboard and mattress, infants sleeping with drunk, exhausted, or medicated parents, infants sleeping on pillows, and infants sleeping with other siblings.

There are safety precautions to take while cosleeping, and parents who don’t take those precautions are running the risk of cosleeping being very dangerous for their babies.

I suspect the baby’s mother in the article was on medication, making her less aware of her infant. Tragic.

PHEMIE…What’s up with the kids not realizing the baby was nearly suffocating?!? Some people.


#12

What an awful, tragic story.

I’m not against co-sleeping, but I do think it’s important to take safety very seriously. This poor mother was probably on some heavy duty pain medications (at least I know I was at that point), exhausted from just having given birth and having a brand new baby to care for, plus on a hospital bed which is narrow and has those guardrails…really just not the ideal scenario for co-sleeping, especially for a brand new parent.

I just can’t imagine how devastated that poor mother must be. And the nurse. That’s something you never get over.


#13

[quote="sanctareparata, post:11, topic:247937"]
IS cosleeping "very" dangerous? No.
CAN cosleeping be "very" dangerous? Yes.

The vast majority of infants who die in adult beds die from negligence, such as infants placed alone in an adult bed, infants napping in adult beds, rolling and getting entrapped between headboard and mattress, infants sleeping with drunk, exhausted, or medicated parents, infants sleeping on pillows, and infants sleeping with other siblings.

There are safety precautions to take while cosleeping, and parents who don't take those precautions are running the risk of cosleeping being very dangerous for their babies.

I suspect the baby's mother in the article was on medication, making her less aware of her infant. Tragic.

PHEMIE......What's up with the kids not realizing the baby was nearly suffocating?!? Some people.

[/quote]

Actually, you are wrong. BOTH co-sleeping and children sleeping in an adult bed are dangerous. The reasons you state (baby rolls between head board, parent rolls on top of baby, child is strangled in bedding), etc are the very reasons babies die from co-sleeping. Some people are very deep sleepers and can roll on top of a child and never know it. They are not negligent parents, they are just doing what they think is right but it's tragic.

And as I said before, co-sleeping AND kids sleeping in an adult bed either alone or with an adult is dangerous. As I state earlier, I work in a pediatric hospital and parents have to sign a release in order to allow their child less than six months old to sleep with them. They also have to sign a form if they want a child under the age of two years to sleep in an adult bed. It's a very serious problem. Parents are just not educated about it as much as they should be.

Here is some really good information about the dangers of co-sleeping and/or allowing a small child to sleep in an adult bed. kidshealth.org/parent/general/sleep/cosleeping.html


#14

[quote="noclevername, post:13, topic:247937"]
Actually, you are wrong. BOTH co-sleeping and children sleeping in an adult bed are dangerous. The reasons you state (baby rolls between head board, parent rolls on top of baby, child is strangled in bedding), etc are the very reasons babies die from co-sleeping. Some people are very deep sleepers and can roll on top of a child and never know it. They are not negligent parents, they are just doing what they think is right but it's tragic.

[/quote]

Exactly. The reasons I stated are exactly why babies die in adult beds, BUT those parents are not cosleeping safely. Which is why I call them negligent.

Mothers who cosleep safely are mothers who do not sleep with their babies while they are drunk, or on sedating medication, who do not place their infants on pillows or cover them with bulky bedding, who do not place a baby between herself and the father if the father is a deep sleeper, etc., etc......

And as I said before, co-sleeping AND kids sleeping in an adult bed either alone or with an adult is dangerous.

Then we'll just have to agree to disagree, because I don't believe it's dangerous, if proper precautions are taken.

As I state earlier, I work in a pediatric hospital and parents have to sign a release in order to allow their child less than six months old to sleep with them. They also have to sign a form if they want a child under the age of two years to sleep in an adult bed. It's a very serious problem. Parents are just not educated about it as much as they should be.

The fact that you require parents to sign a release form doesn't make cosleeping automatically dangerous.

Here is some really good information about the dangers of co-sleeping and/or allowing a small child to sleep in an adult bed. kidshealth.org/parent/general/sleep/cosleeping.html

The Consumer Products Safety Commission is in the crib business. Of course they won't promote cosleeping. :rolleyes:

As for the rest of it, notice that NO stats are given as to how any of those deaths occurred. The vast majority of the time, rollovers happen when a parent is drunk or on drugs, and " infants dying in adult beds" doesn't automatically mean they were cosleeping. Sometimes uneducated parents put their infants to sleep unsafely, in adult beds, alone.

By the way, that site isn't showing the dangers of cosleeping, it's showing the dangers of cosleeping unsafely. All the same reasons I already mentioned, which as I said, doesn't make cosleeping unsafe in and of itself. Notice the last page - it tells HOW to cosleep safely.

The AAP cannot recommend it, since, in the event of a death, they could be liable for encouraging cosleeping. It's in their best interests to not promote it, but it doesn't mean it's not safe when done correctly.


#15

[quote="noclevername, post:10, topic:247937"]
Co-sleeping is very dangerous. I work part-time in a pediatric hospital. If we have a patient under six months of age and the parent insists on co-sleeping, they have to sign a release form and that form has to be witnessed. I understand the flexiblity it offers, especially with nursing, but it's a dangerous habit. An infant suffocating from co-sleeping with a parent happens a lot more than newspapers report.

[/quote]

Just out of curiosity, do you know how many co-sleeping deaths there are as opposed to crib death (SIDS)?


#16

[quote="Lil_Cat, post:15, topic:247937"]
Just out of curiosity, do you know how many co-sleeping deaths there are as opposed to crib death (SIDS)?

[/quote]

It's interesting how things change over the years.

I trained as a nurse back in the early 70s. We were trained to always position infants on their sides or stomachs, NEVER, EVER on their backs. So, when DD was born I did what I'd been trained to do, causing her great grandmother to come running out of the bedroom all upset because DD was sleeping on her stomach. I didn't know why she was so upset, I just told her everything was ok. I later learned that when she had her kids, tummy sleeping was a no-no.

Fast forward 20 years and now it's a cardinal sin to put an infant to sleep on its tummy. And NO BLANKETS! And SIDS rates have fallen. Nobody worries about the baby choking on vomit the way we were trained.

We seem to be lucky that our kids survived to adulthood. Heck, we're lucky WE survived to adulthood.


#17

[quote="Lil_Cat, post:15, topic:247937"]
Just out of curiosity, do you know how many co-sleeping deaths there are as opposed to crib death (SIDS)?

[/quote]

About 64 babies die every year in adult beds. Almost 45% of those die while on a sofa (that counts as an adult bed for the stats). Another large percentage are rollovers by parents who were drunk, on drugs, or on sleep aids or other meds. If I remember correctly, another 1/5 of the deaths occurred on waterbeds. The other deaths are usually from an unsafe environment - pillows, heavy bedding, siblings in the bed, and of course, infants unattended on a bed altogether.

About 50 babies die every year in crib accidents.

Around 2500 babies die every year from SIDS, and babies who do not cosleep (either in the same bed or the same room) are more at risk for SIDS....unless the parents are smokers....then they should not cosleep since that increases SIDS deaths.


#18

[quote="Phemie, post:16, topic:247937"]
It's interesting how things change over the years.

I trained as a nurse back in the early 70s. We were trained to always position infants on their sides or stomachs, NEVER, EVER on their backs. So, when DD was born I did what I'd been trained to do, causing her great grandmother to come running out of the bedroom all upset because DD was sleeping on her stomach. I didn't know why she was so upset, I just told her everything was ok. I later learned that when she had her kids, tummy sleeping was a no-no.

Fast forward 20 years and now it's a cardinal sin to put an infant to sleep on its tummy. And NO BLANKETS! And SIDS rates have fallen. Nobody worries about the baby choking on vomit the way we were trained.

We seem to be lucky that our kids survived to adulthood. Heck, we're lucky WE survived to adulthood.

[/quote]

Yep, which is my point.

People have been co-sleeping for MILLENNIA and from my understanding crib death is a relatively new phenomenon because it has only been in recent history that Baby has been left in a room by themselves.

We put DD on her tummy to sleep as soon as she came home from the hospital, and she slept in the bed with us from day one. Oh the horrors!!

Its amazing that the human race hasn't died off with all the "no-no's" that we have now that people practiced for thousands of years :)

And I'm still curious about the number of crib deaths vs. co-sleeping deaths at the pediatric hospital. Mostly because I read about infant sleep in my spare time and I would like to hear actual experiences of hospital employees :nerd:


#19

[quote="Lil_Cat, post:18, topic:247937"]
We put DD on her tummy to sleep as soon as she came home from the hospital, and she slept in the bed with us from day one. Oh the horrors!!

[/quote]

So did we. With all of them. :o


#20

I have never had kids but personally, I would not want a baby in my bed. I have no idea how anyone can get a good night sleep when in the back of their mind they have to pay attention to not rolling over on a baby.

Also, I can't help but think if that it is a bit of a hard pill to swallow for a man. The fact that his wife wants to sleep with the kid instead of him. It has nothing to do with sex, just that at night, even if they are on opposite sides of the bed, you share the same bed as your spouse and no one esle.

But that is just me. What others do is up to them

CM


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