Newly Returned With A Couple Of Questions


#1

I understand that Sunday Mass is vital. Does the Saturday Vigil count?

Also, what are the limitations on what one can do in regard to physical work on Sundays? Stuff like mowing the lawn, yardwork, housework, cooking, etc.

If you have the answers, great; if you can point me to the Cathechism great too!

I am so happy to be back!

God Bless!

Stradioti


#2

Saturday vigil counts in every way. Im not sure about the second question though, as it is somthing i’ve always wondered myself and have never gotten a straight answer on.


#3

Thanks for the reply. I try to dedicate Sunday’s to The Lord. Only reading and listening to things to strengthen my Faith. Being single, I sometimes do a few loads of laundry and such but usually avoid heavy work outside.

I guess my other question about Sunday Mass kind of remains unanswered. No fault of yours.

If one goes to Mass three times during the week is it okay to choose not to go on Sunday? My thinking is that is never okay to choose not to.

Hopefully some more folks will jump in here and give us a link or answers that will help us.

Thanks again for the reply! :slight_smile:


#4

I’d imagine the Saturday Vigil would definitely “count”; perhaps you can also address your questions to the amazing apologists here. I’m a baby convert (at last year’s Easter Vigil :smiley: ) and wanted to just say to you “WELCOME BACK AND WELCOME HOME!!!”. :heart:


#5

Thank you for your warm welcome back. I’m as new as you having been away for 30 years; since I was 2nd grade just had my 1st Communion, etc.

I’ve learned so much in the past few months. It’s been interesting to learn the truth behind all the misconceptions being perpetuated about The Church. Truly amazing and liberating is our Holy Church!


#6

The Saturday Vigil counts for the Sunday obligation.

Weekday Mass does not replace or fulfil the Sunday obligation regardless of how many times a week you go.

Yep, it is hard to get a straight answer on Sunday rest. Even the CCC is sort of vague -

2185 On Sundays and other holy days of obligation, the faithful are to refrain from engaging in work or activities that hinder the worship owed to God, the joy proper to the Lord’s Day, the performance of the works of mercy, and the appropriate relaxation of mind and body.123 Family needs or important social service can legitimately excuse from the obligation of Sunday rest. The faithful should see to it that legitimate excuses do not lead to habits prejudicial to religion, family life, and health.

I think Fr. Vincent Serpa (on AAA) said that mental tasks (such as doing homework) are allowed on Sundays, though I’m not sure how this fits in with the CCC - there are other sources I suppose. Cooking and laundry are sometimes necessary, so I don’t think there’d be a problem with that on Sundays. Yard work / mowing the lawn can wait and probably shouldn’t be done on Sundays if you can help it.
There are all sorts of exceptions especially relating to professional work (eg, you can’t have all doctors take Sundays off!)

For a lot more detail on Sundays, read the appropriate section of the CCC, paragraphs 2168 to 2195, here scborromeo.org/ccc/p3s2c1a3.htm


#7

LOL! What a name! FlopFoot :thumbsup:

Thank you for the great response and link!


#8

2185 On Sundays and other holy days of obligation, the faithful are to refrain from engaging in work or activities that hinder the worship owed to God, the joy proper to the Lord’s Day, the performance of the works of mercy, and the appropriate relaxation of mind and body.123 Family needs or important social service can legitimately excuse from the obligation of Sunday rest. The faithful should see to it that legitimate excuses do not lead to habits prejudicial to religion, family life, and health.

You know, for a religion that gets a lot of flak from critics about it demanding the faithful to be mindless followers of the Pope, there sure are a lot of sections in the Catechism that allow each believer to be faithful to teachings, while keeping their own individuality.

For example, yardwork. I personally don’t find it to be “work” at all. For me, it is a wonderful meditative practice to be outside in God’s creation, tending to my small patch of it. I view weeding as a spiritual exercise- while pulling out physical weeds, I’m contemplating spiritual and moral weeds that need to be yanked from the soil of my soul.

On the other hand, I do not find it acceptable for my children to be involved in sporting events on Sunday. Do other faithful families find no problem with this? Absolutely. And that’s what’s so amazing about our Faith. It clearly lays out what it means to be in obedience, yet leaves room for individual expression of that obedience.

So while it can be annoying to not have a clear cut answer on what one can and can’t engage in on Sunday, it is so much more spiritually beneficial to have it this way. Now, you are expected to really know your faith, and to honestly find how to apply it to your life.

Cheers,
C


#9

Welcome!

I’m going to say any thing that causes one to be physically tired or mentally. Sunday should be a day of rest and worship to the Lord and whatever work we do should allow us to remain focused on the worship of Jesus Christ, I think each person has to decide that for themselves. God bless!


#10

I would not say there is anything wrong with cooking on Sunday. People need to eat, and if you did not cook on Sunday, you would have to go to a restaurant where staff are being paid to work on Sunday.


#11

Great responses, thank you so much.

Cari, yours is really great. I remember growing up hearing that Catholics worshipped the Pope as if he came before Christ. It all made sense when I watched “What Catholics Really Believe” by Dr. Ray Guarendi and Fr. Kevin Fete. Those DVDs helped me tremendously.

I’m like you in my view of yardwork but I’ll try to keep it a Saturday task. It is a real spiritual labor in so many ways. I loved the way you expressed it. :slight_smile:

Stradioti


#12

I was told that one should not do on Sunday what one does during the week to earn a living. It defeats the purpose of the sabbath, which is to rejuvenate one self after the past week and before the coming week. As people of Faith we also attend Mass or Services on Sunday or at the Saturday Vigil. It is surely an opportunity to spend a bit more time with the Lord than one might have time for during the week. The notion that Sunday is the only day to be dedicated to the Lord is an error. Pray constantly as Paul admonishes us. I personally have a difficult time understanding folks who go so all out on a weekend that they are exhausted on Monday morning. Seems out of wack. It is good to keep in mind that Jesus said," The sabbath is for man and not the man for the sabbath." He wants us revitalized in spirit and body by Monday morning.


#13

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.