Next generation of Catholics


#21

[quote=StCsDavid]Adam,

Pray for wisdom. IMHO, you seem to have substituted knowledge for wisdom. That’s understandable as you are only 24. You haven’t had time to really experience life yet. Did God call you to the seminary…or did you call yourself? If you have only an academic understanding of this faith, your enthusiasm will indeed fall off. You have to extend yourself beyond what is knowable. I really don’t mean to insult you, but I do perceive a sense of arrogance in your writing. Christ instructed us to come to him as a child…not a scholar. Come to God with humble and contrite heart…not with the security that you’re the smartest guy in the room. Knowledge is a good thing, perhaps a great thing, but it’s only useful if it is used to glorify God…versus satisfying self.
[/quote]

I don’t ascribe to this Kierkegaardian view of the faith. I (and as far as I know the Church, at least Maritain makes a strong argument for it in ‘Aquinas: Angel of the Schools’) is fairly Thomistic in this sense that we cannot ‘turn off’ our reason. Unlike Kierkegaard I do not think that I can believe something that I know to be wrong.

Belief after all is an act of the intellect, not of the will. In fact, many commentators on Aquinas like Banes note that their is very little room for a ‘will’ (squeezed between ‘grace’ and ‘intellect’). This is the reason for the Molina reaction to Thomism’s more Calvinist leanings. And I definitively do not ascribe to the Scotus compromise which opened the way for nominalism and later Lutheranism.

I have discussed this topic earlier here: forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=2132&highlight=amarischuk


#22

I go to St. Mary’s here at Texas A&M.

True every Catholic here at this parish is so on fire with the Holy Spirit, but it is astonishing to me just how many are. Such enthusiasm is a gift from God, not a sign of immaturity. If God decides to not bless us with that fruit so be it, but I am immensely grateful for what he has given us.

Yes I did go to Tim Staples’ talk. It was great. Unfortunately I wasn’t able to make Janet Smith’s talk, although I really would have liked to.


#23

[quote=amarischuk]I don’t ascribe to this Kierkegaardian view of the faith. I (and as far as I know the Church, at least Maritain makes a strong argument for it in ‘Aquinas: Angel of the Schools’) is fairly Thomistic in this sense that we cannot ‘turn off’ our reason. Unlike Kierkegaard I do not think that I can believe something that I know to be wrong.

Belief after all is an act of the intellect, not of the will. In fact, many commentators on Aquinas like Banes note that their is very little room for a ‘will’ (squeezed between ‘grace’ and ‘intellect’). This is the reason for the Molina reaction to Thomism’s more Calvinist leanings. And I definitively do not ascribe to the Scotus compromise which opened the way for nominalism and later Lutheranism.
[/quote]

You’re obviously well read, and your ability to regurgitate is impressive. I’m not sure that I cotton to your assertion that belief is an act of intellect as I have lived and seen many experiences where it was not, though I can see where one could find personal safety in that view. Nothing is risked. Hebrews 11:1 tells us “Now faith is the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen;” which would seem to go quite a ways towards one having the ability to indeed turn off reason. Would you say that you are closer to John Knox or the Catholic Church’s teachings?


#24

IA, I go to Church there too! Lovely, isn’t it. Have you heard Austin lead the Angus Dei on the Mon’s w/Fr Kurt? I love that!


#25

amarischuk: This may be off-topic, in fact I’m sure it is, but I must ask it anyway. What do you know to be wrong? As someone who is a convert to the faith from atheism, I sincerely want to know what issues you have found that the Church can’t answer.

I may challenge you if I think there is an answer, but otherwise I’m honestly asking. At the very least you can prompt me to deeper study through your doubts.

Feel free to PM me rather than post them here, if you prefer.

:blessyou:


#26

I A:

That’s a drive to Houston. But worth it huh?

I didn’t make it to Janet Smith’s talk for I’m in Wisconsin at the moment. Although my wife and several friends were able to. She said that Janet hit home run after home run. On a friday night, over 70 students from Rice University showed up and from her conversation with Janet, she said she was ready to throw it down with a really secular crowd. But there was very little or no opposition just honest inquiries. Very good sign.

As for enthusiasm…the true test of virtue is when God withdraws consolation. It is easy to be faithful when we feel good. It is when we maintain our norms regardless of the aridity. The emotion is a base faculty and if we attach our relationship with God in the highs of emotion, we will definitely be at a loss when the low comes around. As our relationship with God grows he will withdraw the emotional frequency so we can grow our relationship in a deeper level of the will and conviction. The contemplatives write about this a lot. “The dark night of the soul.”

in XT


#27

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