Next time you see another liturgical abuse at Mass

Be glad you aren’t part of this [edited]: youtube.com/watch?v=4-94JhLEiN0

:highprayer::nun2::crossrc::harp:

[edited] It was clearly not a catholic church.

[edited] Even LifeTeen sounds like Gregorian Chant compared to this!

:eek:WOW I don’t know what to say!:eek:

That is the stupidest thing I have EVER seen in my ENTIRE life!
talk about a mockery of marriage. I thought it was a joke at first. [edited] I am so glad the Lord has blessed me and brought me to the Catholic Church!

I know, huh! and the woman priest seemed to be having a good time too.

They should’ve just had a civil wedding at a nightclub or something.

I’m quite surprised by the posts here. While I understand the serious nature of Marriage I also understand that it’s one of the most joyous things as well. When I first saw the video I was a little taken aback but after watching the whole thing and allowing myself to feel the love of Christ for these people I realized that it was a celebration of the joy of marriage. We may not all want to dance down the isle but when a couple feels so happy to be getting married that they can’t help but dance their way to the altar, how can you condemn that. It may not have been the solemn beginning to a ceremony that we would expect, howevever, it did make me cry to know that there is such happiness at joining. I seriously doubt Christ would make fun of them or condemn them. He would be happy that they are getting married and not living in sin for the rest of their lives. We should be less judgmental and more loving. We should be more like Christ.

We may not all want to dance down the isle but when a couple feels so happy to be getting married that they can’t help but dance their way to the altar, how can you condemn that.

I’ve been to weddings that have done things similar to this (though I’ve never seen it done in a church - “church weddings” are apparently rare these days among non-Catholics). Apparently, dancing into a wedding and doing a strange first dance (usually either some sort of Latin ballroom or the Thriller Dance) is popular these days.

The thing is, in my experience doing something like this is all about the couple and not about the wedding. It’s about doing something memorable and different and being cool.

I don’t want to be a spoil-sport here, people. I can see how this would be odd to Catholics. But, please refrain from making general judgments/assumptions about all Protestants based on this one video. No faith group is to be denigrated on CAF. Thank you all.

I think it might seem odd to a number of Protestants as well. :wink:

I wonder how the presiding minister (the woman on the steps?) took all this. She seemed to be clapping along. Religious overtones aside, to me they looked like a bizarre group of dancing fools*. Take odds on how seriously they incorporate their faith into their marriage?

I’m not judging, just speculating.

*a la Frank Zappa

Have none of you read in the old testament that David danced before the Lord naked? How many times does the Bible tell us to dance before the Lord in praise and worship? A LOT!
I saw no action that was a sin! They were simply walking up the aisle in a joyful way. What do you think it means to make a “joyful noise unto the Lord?” Does that mean we can’t sing joyful songs?

I think I hear a lot of “black and white” judging going on here. Why not keep silent, and let God be the judge? Why can’t everyone just say, “oh, that was different” and not judge one another so harshly?

Was the music and dancing in the video directed towards God? Or directed towards the bride and groom? Was their a single mention in the music of Praising God? Was there any detectable praise going on?

I think the answers should be pretty clear.

It’s not a matter of judging, it’s a matter of discernment. Nobody here has said it was ***sinful ***behavior, rather that it seemed inappropriately directed. As fastlearner said, this appears to be about the couple and not the (wedding/Marriage/God).

The “we should not judge” relativism is a slippery slope, friend. Fred Phelps and his clan have a unique way of interpreting scripture and preaching “God’s word”. Should we just say, “Oh, that was different?” too?

Of course not. While we should be careful not to irresponsibly bash others, even if they are behaving inappropriately or sinfully, scripture also instructs us to help correct our Christian brothers and Sisters when they have slipped or fallen.

OK, in this case, that ship has already sailed. But if I had been invited to this wedding, I would have walked out quietly. That would be discernment, not judgment. :slight_smile:

If you read the lyrics to that song, it’s about two people going out dancing (which is a euphemism for sex). The song even starts out “It’s just you and me moving at the speed of light until eternity”, so it’s pretty clear that the song (and day) is about the couple in a two-person marriage and not in a three-person marriage.

But that might be fine for them. Some protestants do believe that marriage is a two-person experience and that God is not involved. That’s part of why they allow divorce (not sure how they justify any of that from Scripture, but that’s not really the point of this thread).

If you view the situation from that perspective - that the wedding was about two people marrying each other without God - then the self-centered nature of the event makes sense. They were having a party for them, and they were going to enter in a flamboyant way that made them the center of attention that day, and for several months on Youtube. Obviously that perspective is in great conflict with our Church and our believes, and thus it seems unimaginable for someone to do that.

Would I witness a wedding like that? Unfortunately I have. Obviously not as a member of the bridal party and nothing that elaborate, but I have seen things along those lines (not in a church, though). I compare it to any of the weddings I’ve been to where the couple hasn’t involved God.

:slight_smile: FYI this topic has been posted in two other forums:

forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=360367

forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=361258

I think this video is filled with joy and I love watching it!

And I’m so tired of all the negative, judgmental, and uncharitable comments…

Could you imagine a priest ever allowing this during a wedding in a Catholic church? Of course not, the whole premise is counter to what we believe about the sacrament. So why would anyone voicing disagreement be considered “negative, judgmental, and uncharitable”?

It comes down to this: do you think Jesus is a part of a wedding and a marriage?

If you believe that Jesus is a part of a wedding and marriage, think of this: let’s say Jesus miraculously appeared in that church. Would it be appropriate to dance for joy? Sure. Would it be appropriate to yell out “Hey, everyone, look at me!” then dance around to make yourself (and not Jesus) the center of attention? Of course not - everyone should be paying attention to Jesus and your actions should serve as adoration. So if you believe Jesus was in that church and apart of that wedding, their intentional action to take the focus off of Jesus and on to them in a way that was not adoration was inappropriate.

If you believe that Jesus is not a part of a wedding and/or marriage, then the bride and groom drawing attention to only themselves is appropriate.

Based on their interview with the Today Show, it’s clear that their believe is that Jesus was not in the room. However, as Catholics, it’s our believe that God is an integral part of any wedding. So it’s no surprise that based on our believe, this would be inappropriate. Sure it’s fun to watch, but it’s more appropriate for their reception than their ceremony. I wouldn’t have walked out as others have suggested, though. It’s no more offensive than an atheist wedding or a Hindi wedding.

Do you have a link to that interview (you can PM me)?

Yeah, I think the dancing and celebration outside of the church is fine. In days of yore, wedding celebrations went on for days. That is a party!

I saw it live on Today. Sorry.

How could you defend this junk!! Aaaaa;)

It was difficult to watch this. How childish.

That aside, I was part of the “We hate ‘churchianity’” strain of Protestantism most of my life, and I can tell you that most of the Protestants I have known would have said that this couple was just trying to make their ceremony (I use that word very loosely) more “personal.” (The Baptists, however, would be appalled! And as for the lady “preacher”… I digress…) The man who sang at my wedding is now a non-denom pastor, and he got a tattoo during their Sunday morning service last winter. (Someone else was preaching, obviously.) There was some kind of point to it which is what the other pastor was preaching about, but although he told me what “Object Lesson” everyone was supposed to learn, I really don’t remember. It made me glad to be a Catholic when I heard about it.

My grandmother was fond of saying, “There but for the grace of God go I” and I think the same can be said for our beautiful Catholic Faith. The sacraments keep us tied to Christ. Alleluia.

The problem is that the Church inteprets this in a whole different manner. David’s dance did not fall within the context of the official, sacrificial cultic worship of Ancient Israel. While it was a dance of praise, it was not connected to the cultic worship mandated by God (who spent significant chunks of time in the Old Testament dictating to Moses just how, when, where and in what manner He should be worshipped).

As another poster noted, the dancing also seemed more about the couple than about God, Himself. There is a time and place for everything. Dancing around is perfectly appropriate during the reception, but, not during the religious portion of the ceremony. The couple could have easily danced their way down the aisle as they were introduced at the reception (along with the rest of the wedding party).

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