NFP and PCOS


#1

Greetings all!

I am 25 years old and am going to be married in 2 months. I am a practicing Catholic and planned to use NFP (Creighton). I went to a new gynecologist for just a check up and gave him my history. Basically it is that I get a period every month that consistently lasts for about a week, but is very, very heavy two days out of the seven I also get cervical mucus (gross, but I guess this is the forum for it). I had attempted to do some tracking before my appointment and had been using the Clear Blue Fertility Monitor, which showed that I ovulated each month (normal low, high and peak days).

After hearing about my very heavy periods, my doctor decided to do some blood work. It turns out that my progesterone is low and two other hormones (FSH and LH, I think) are consistent with someone with PCOS (no, I do not have excessive hair growth or terrible acne. I am overweight 5’10" 200lbs but not obese). I go back to see him in two weeks. I spoke on the phone with the nurse and asked her if this would prevent me from having children. She said “no,” but that they need to regulate some things so I won’t have any issues.

I just found out about this today. I haven’t even told my fiance yet because he is at work (I will). I am very sad and scared. I want to have children very much and although I know the nurse said that it won’t stop me, I can’t help but be a pessimist.

Can anyone give me a positive outlook or words of encouragement? Has anyone ever heard of a case similar to mine?


#2

Many women with PCOS do have children.

And, you have not be diagnosed for sure yet. So, do your homework and know your options-- and make sure YOU keep control of your options.

NOT medical advice: simply moral advice on treatments which might be pushed at you: Watch out for those code words like "regulate" which might mean "put you on the pill." Also, many times doctors try putting PCOS women on clomid to ovluate, which reduces cervical mucus so when they still don't get pregnant then in vitro is recommended. Of course, in vitro is immoral.

Not saying this will be your experience. There are so many things that can treat conditions, including diet and exercise.

But, if you begin to be faced with moral dilemmas, or even to prempt such things, it might be a good idea to take your charts and consult with Dr. Hilgers (inventor of the Creighton model of NFP and NaPro Technology) at the Pope Paul VI Institute, www.popepaulvi.com, as all of his treatments are in line with Church teaching and he has a very good history of success. He does consult long distance, and he has trained many doctors in his methods so you might find one near you.


#3

Hi there,

I have PCOS too, though right now I am not charting, though I should really get back to doing so.

I was overweight (significantly) as well. I can tell you that weight loss really helped many of symptoms clear up. Proper nutrition and exercise is important to help manage PCOS.

Even before I was interested in the CC, I didn’t like the way many PCOS doctors practically throw BCP’s at their patients. I just happen to think it isn’t good for the body. There are alternatives.

It turns out in the case of Catholics that the alternative medicine world can be helpful here. They too tend to believe in charting, tend to eschew BCP’s, and seek more holistic approaches to managing PCOS.

If I can be of help to you, please let me know–feel free to PM me.

God bless!


#4

One of my PCOS friends has 5 DC’s now :slight_smile:


#5

Sorry, I don’t know what a “DC” is, but from your emoticon it looks like a good thing!

Thanks for all of the encouragement everyone. I am fortunate that I am working with a gynecologist with very strong Catholic beliefs. It was at his suggestion that I start charting before the my marriage, so we can get things under control.

Does anyone know the connection between PCOS and insulin? Diabetes runs in my family (father, paternal grandfather, paternal aunt, paternal cousin). Perhaps I’ll luck out and treatment now can prevent diabetes in the future. Trying to stay optimistic.


#6

DC = Dear Children

DH = Dear Husband

DW = Dear Wife

DFIL, DMIL,

etc.


#7

PCOS and insulin resistance are very much intertwined. Treating the PCOS would be treating the insulin resistance. (Type 2 diabetics are insulin resistant).


#8

Sue D Num,

I have PCOS too. Although mine sounds like more of a severe case. (I don’t have periods unless i’m on medication, have the extra hair, etc). I have conceived once without medication, but miscarried due to something totally different than PCOS. So it is possible. :thumbsup:

I will suggest reading and researching as much as possible. It has helped me out alot in the last 4 years. You can also join www.soulcysters.net/ It is full of all sorts of things on PCOS.


#9

[quote="Willsfirecracke, post:8, topic:187634"]
Sue D Num,

I have PCOS too. Although mine sounds like more of a severe case. (I don't have periods unless i'm on medication, have the extra hair, etc). I have conceived once without medication, but miscarried due to something totally different than PCOS. So it is possible. :thumbsup:

I will suggest reading and researching as much as possible. It has helped me out alot in the last 4 years. You can also join www.soulcysters.net/ It is full of all sorts of things on PCOS.

[/quote]

Indeed, SoulCysters is a very good web site. :thumbsup:


#10

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