NFP and spontaneous abortions/miscarriage


#1

I have read on a few occasions that sex during the infertile period isn't necessarily a good idea (for want of a better word) for example:

Embryonic health[edit source | editbeta]
It has been suggested that unprotected intercourse in the infertile periods of the menstrual cycle may still result in conceptions, but create embryos incapable of implanting.[25] It has also been suggested that pregnancies resulting from method failures of periodic abstinence methods are at increased risk of miscarriage and birth defects due to aged gametes at the time of conception.[26] Other research suggests that timing of conception has no effect on miscarriage rates,[27] low birth weight, or preterm delivery.[28]

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calendar-based_contraceptive_methods#Knaus.E2.80.93Ogino_or_rhythm_method

And this study which suggests that having had a miscarriage in the past, delaying conception increases increases the risk of another one. ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7755073

I just wondered what people-interested-in-biology's thoughts on this were...


#2

The later in your menstrual cycle you are when you conceive, the higher the likelihood for miscarriage, but it is usually a miscarriage that is not clinically recognized. There is no evidence that preimplantation or unrecognized pregnancy losses increases your risk of early miscarriage of clinically recognized pregnancies.

I don't buy that aged gamete business for a second. I looked at that poorly written section of Wikipedia and the source they used (26). The article they cited actually says the opposite. In general, be very skeptical of anything you read on Wikipedia.

There is no moral culpability when it comes to natural miscarriages.

The second study you quote states that there is no increased risk of spontaneous abortion in women using NFP.


#3

It seems from the quote you posted, that the theory has been neither proved nor disproved, but rather has proponents and opponents, and since that would mean that there is not sufficient evidence to make a real connection, I would say that there probably is no reason to believe in a connection at the moment. I am not in any way good at bio, by the way, just letting you know, but I do enjoy debating and arguing far too much to let that tidbit from the quote go by without comment.:D


#4

If you conceive during the infertile period, then you are not actually in the infertile period. The ovum is viable for 24 hours. So, none of the info posted above makes any sense.

You cannot conceive "later" or "earlier" in the cycle-- you can conceive only when the egg is mature and present, whenever that is in the cycle. The luteal phase is critical for implantation. If you have a short luteal phase, it can be detected and corrected. It has nothing to do with when you have sex.

I'm sorry. This is bunk.


#5

[quote="1ke, post:4, topic:335058"]
If you conceive during the infertile period, then you are not actually in the infertile period. The ovum is viable for 24 hours. So, none of the info posted above makes any sense.

You cannot conceive "later" or "earlier" in the cycle-- you can conceive only when the egg is mature and present, whenever that is in the cycle. The luteal phase is critical for implantation. If you have a short luteal phase, it can be detected and corrected. It has nothing to do with when you have sex.

I'm sorry. This is bunk.

[/quote]

Really it should say implantation. When there is a delay from the time of ovulation to implantation there is an increased risk of miscarriage, this doesn't address when fertilization occurs. This might be interpreted by some as conceiving later in the cycle (erroneously)


#6

Thanks everyone, I understand a little more now.

[quote="THP, post:5, topic:335058"]
Really it should say implantation. When there is a delay from the time of ovulation to implantation there is an increased risk of miscarriage, this doesn't address when fertilization occurs. This might be interpreted by some as conceiving later in the cycle (erroneously)

[/quote]

:newidea:


#7

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